Archive for the ‘Apply First Aid’ category

First Aid skills used on Child left in a hot car!

January 7th, 2018

First Aid and CPR Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Training Rooms in the Dee Why RSL. Free Provide First Aid Manual and CPR face Mask. Allen’s Training First Aid online App access.

WOMAN was outraged after finding a baby crying and sweating in a parked car, but the dad’s reaction really made her see red.

Emma Russell, NZ Herald
news.com.auJANUARY 7, 20186:34AM
Have you ever left your child in the car?
A WOMAN is outraged after finding a four-month-old baby “cooking” in a parked car in Whanganui, New Zealand on Wednesday.

Margi Keys said there was something distressing about the baby’s crying that prompted her to investigate, the New Zealand Herald reports.

To her horror she found the crying baby red and sweating in a car she described as a furnace.

“There were heaps of people around but no one took any notice. I started calling out asking whose baby it was and eventually a man in his 20s waved at me but didn’t come over to the car,” she said.

The incident occurred around midday when the outside temperature peaked at 25C and there was no wind.

Ms Keys said the baby looked extremely uncomfortable so she slid open the back door unclipped the seatbelt from his car seat and gently pulled him out.

“As soon as he was out of the car and in my arms, he stopped crying.”

Police say that young children must never be left alone in a house or vehicle and they require constant supervision.

The parent of the child didn’t appear to realise how dangerous leaving a child in a car was, according to Ms Keys. Picture: iStock
The parent of the child didn’t appear to realise how dangerous leaving a child in a car was, according to Ms Keys. Picture: iStockSource:Supplied

It is illegal to leave a child under the age of 14 without reasonable provision for their care.

Ms Keys said she couldn’t believe with all the publicity about the danger of leaving a child in a hot car that it still happens.

“Heatstroke can happen in two minutes. Brain damage can occur. Death is then not far away.”

In 2015 a 16-month-old baby died after being left in a car outside of the mothers Whanganui workplace.

Ms Keys said she approached the man and told him that the baby was very hot and distressed and about the dangers of leaving a baby in a hot car.

“He protested that he’d ‘only been gone two minutes’ and that ‘he was asleep’ when he parked the car.”

She said the man didn’t seem that concerned and told her that the baby usually cries and it was normal.

“I said to him that most babies need to be held a lot, they need to feel secure, and being held and soothed helps them to have that sense of security.”

But Ms Keys said even though the man agreed not to do it again, she was unsure he understood how dangerous it was.

“If you are at the beach and you see a child distressed in the water you go to save them, the same principle should apply to a baby left in a car.”

This article was originally published by the New Zealand Herald and appears here with permission.

2018 First Aid and CPR courses – Northern Beaches, Sydney

January 4th, 2018

Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training courses are back for January and February 2018. With a new year we think its time that we try and get everyone trained in the basics of first aid or CPR. Simple Instruction is a local Northern Beaches, Sydney First Aid provider for all workplaces, industries and safety requirements. Course are available at the Dee Why RSL and caters for people in suburbs across the Manly Warringah region.

Listed below are the 5 top reasons why first aid or CPR training is so important.

• Increases safety: The basis of first aid or CPR training is “prevention”. It is always better to be safe than to be sorry. Knowledge of first aid or CPR promotes the sense of safety and well being amongst people, prompting them to be more alert and safe in the surroundings they dwell in. Awareness and desire to be accident free keeps you more safe and secure, reducing the number of causalities and accidents.

• Helps save lives: If a person who is trained to give first aid administration happens to see any casualty in his vicinity, immediate action can be taken and lives be saved. While it is natural for most of us to rush to support any injured person, a trained person is more reliable, confident and in control of himself and his actions while in trauma situations.

• Helps relieve pain: Some injuries require a very simple solution like applying ice pack or a quick rub. A ride to the emergency room is not necessary, at least not for some time. In such cases, calling a person trained in first aid courses is more reliable. They can help reduce the pain by performing simple procedures and can help relieve pain at least temporarily.

• Makes people more secure: Knowing that you can save your own life when required, or that of the people you know or those in trauma during some emergency helps you relax more and be more secure. The sense of security promotes a healthy and a more confident environment around you where you and the people around you would feel more secure. The presence of such people provides reassurance to the others in the situation.

• Prevents the situation from becoming worse: A trained person would know how to keep the situation from becoming bad to worse. They will provide temporary treatment which will keep the condition of the victim from deteriorating, till professional help arrives. Something is better than nothing!

Knowledge of first aid and CPR training promotes a healthy, secure and a safer environment, and instills confidence amongst people, their families, their colleagues and associates thus making the Northern Beaches, Sydney a safer place. Basic first aid or CPR knowledge is very helpful in dealing with trauma situations. Not just the medical help they provide, but the confidence they exhibit is very helpful during casualties. Being trained to provide first aid is useful to oneself and society.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

January First Aid and CPR Courses

January 3rd, 2018

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR accredited training course are continuing throughout January and February 2018 with Simple Instruction conducting courses out of the Dee Why RSL. The courses are filling fast as participants are coming to the Northern Beaches from all over Sydney.

We cater to not only locals on the Northern Beaches from Palm Beach and Newport to Manly, Dee Why and Belrose but to all of Sydney with people coming form the CBD, North Shore, Chatswood, Bondi and the Central Coast. With First aid and CPR courses essential for most jobs and careers its essential we cater for individuals as they make their New Years resolutions which include Career changes.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au
All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

Provide First Aid Certificate (Formerly Apply and Senior First Aid)

October 23rd, 2017

Apply the first aid knowledge you learn from a Simple Instruction Provide First Aid and CPR course held at the Dee Why RSL on the beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney NSW. Simple Instruction is the leading HLTAID001 (Provide CPR), HLTAID003 (Provide First Aid) and HLTAID004 (Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting(childcare first aid)) in Sydney and love working with our Northern Beaches locals to make the Manly Warringah area a safe place.

We offer courses to all our locals and will attend private course across Sydney. More recently we ahve completed courses in Avalon, Balgowlah, Brookvale, Belrose, Manly, Narrabeen, Dee Why, Mona Vale, Frenchs Foorest, Mosman, Cremorne, North Sydney and Cammeray. We tailor our course to all industries and love attending our local business partners in fitness, health and many more.

By updating your first aid an CPR skills you are helping those close to you including family (baby), workmates and friends. Apply the knowledge that you learn in our relevant, fun, easy, online, cheap and energetic course to real life scenarios.

Allen’s Training is our RTO 90909 and we conduct all courses under their auspices. Do better than St John’s!

Find your White card online – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid and CPR (includes Asthma and Anaphylaxis)

October 23rd, 2017

The Northern Beaches of Sydney’s number 1 course provider for HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training courses under ACECQA standards. Simple Instruction prides its on delivering fast, efficient, online and cost effective First Aid courses.

Simple Instruction has reduced its childcare first aid HLTAID004 costs to $130 per person and have courses being conducted at the Dee Why RSL on a weekly basis.

Simple Instruction will also come to your Childcare, workplace, or home and deliver courses at a time that suits you.

Being the best first aid course in Sydney we have also reduced our prices in the Provide First Aid Course to $100 per person and our Provide CPR HLTAID001 (Formerly Apply First Aid) training course to $55 per person. With the reduction in price we have seen and increase in numbers at the course so please book today. Belrose

Allen’s Training is our co-provider and we deliver courses under the banner of their RTO 90909.

Book today – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Looking for a white card course – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

Applying First Aid Training – St John’s First Aid Course

June 5th, 2017

CPR courses save lives. What a great effort by this pregnant women to save her husband. Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Get accredited training through Allen’s Training and Simple Instruction – we offer HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course that cover all industry requirements.

Pregnant woman saves partner’s life: ‘I would have done CPR until I collapsed’
BEN PIKE, The Sunday Telegraph
February 5, 2017 5:00am
Subscriber only
A MIRACULOUS, superhuman effort from a heavily pregnant woman has saved the life of the love of her life.

Karen Clark’s partner Colin Winn went into cardiac arrest inside their Coogee apartment on Australia Day.

Ms Clark, 36 weeks pregnant, called triple-0 at 3.35pm and was told that to begin CPR she needed to move her unconscious 87kg IT manager partner from the couch on to the floor.

“I’m thinking: ‘How the hell can I do that when I can’t even roll over in bed without grunting’,” the 37-year-old said.

Not only did she get him on to the floor but she then drew on her St John first aid training and performed CPR on him for an incredible 10 minutes ­before paramedics arrived.

The exertion required for effective CPR means medical professionals swap over every minute.

Doctors said performing CPR for 10 minutes is the equivalent of a fit person running 2km at a three-quarter pace. Ms Clark, who is expecting her first child, did it while eight months pregnant.

“But adrenaline and the man you love dying in front of you, and carrying his child, is the biggest motivator you can ever imagine,” she said.

“I would have done it until I collapsed.”

The second miracle was that the paramedics were carrying a battery-powered LUCAS2 machine, which performs CPR at 100 pumps a minute.

The machine is installed in six rapid response ambulances in the Sydney CBD and is part of a clinical trial ­between St Vincent’s Hospital, RPA Hospital and NSW Ambulance.

Since the trial started 18 months ago nine of 16 cardiac arrest patients treated at St Vincent’s have survived. The LUCAS2 machine worked on Mr Winn’s heart before the IT manager was rushed to St Vincent’s.

Mr Winn, already a dad to 10-year-old Chiara, was brought to tears when thinking about how close he was to leaving two kids fatherless. He is ­expected to make a strong recovery.

If they have a boy, the couple is considering the name Lucas — after the ­device that helped save Mr Winn.

Ms Clark brought Mr Winn back down to Earth, jokingly telling him: “Whenever I ask for a cup of tea and you complain, I will say: ‘Remember that time I saved your life?’ ”

● Ms Clark is raising money to have another LUCAS2 machine installed in NSW ambulances. Visit www.gofund me.com/Lucas-CPR-machine

Apply First Aid Northern Beaches (Senior First Aid)

June 1st, 2017

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR specialist Simple Instruction still knows many customers are referring to the Provide First Aid Training Course HLTAID003 as the Apply First Aid Course or the Senior First Aid Course. Its nice to know that Simple Instruction stays up to date with our teaching and our naming of our training courses.

Located at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches we have been providing training courses for local High School Narrabeen Sports High School and Barrenjoey High School through participant contributions.

With clients from Avalon, Davidson, Belrose, Newport, Manly, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill, Cromer and Seaforth all singing our praises it is no wonder we are the Number 1 training organisation on the Northern Beaches.

Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR courses have provided accredited courses for the region.

CPR saves lives

March 10th, 2017

CPR performed correctly can save lives. Simple Instruction wants our Northern Beaches community to get trained in First Aid and CPR. Simple Isntruction provides the Northern Beaches community with online, cheap, accessible First Aid and CPR courses at the (DYRSL) Dee Why RSL.

Six in ten bystanders won’t give a cardiac arrest victim first aid: Up to 1,000 lives a year could be saved if more people attempted to help
Just four in ten prepared to attempt to keep someone alive using first aid
By the time ambulance staff arrive valuable minutes may have been lost
New report from the British Heart Foundation estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate
By Colin Fernandez Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 11:49 +11:00, 6 March 2017 | UPDATED: 03:40 +11:00, 7 March 2017

People are dying needlessly from heart attacks because bystanders are unwilling to step in to carry out life-saving techniques.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid.

This compares to more than seven out of ten people (73 per cent) in Norway, where survival rates from cardiac arrest are three times higher than in the UK.

By the time ambulance staff arrive to treat a patient, valuable minutes may have been lost which will increase the risk of death.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above
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Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above

A new report from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) estimated a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims.

The two main lifesaving methods for someone undergoing a heart attack are cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation.

CPR involves giving regular chest compressions to make the heart pump blood around the body.

Defibrillators are portable machines that give electric shocks to jolt the heart into beating in a regular rhythm.

The machines are designed to be used by untrained members of the public and are stationed in many busy places like shopping centres or supermarkets.

A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above
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A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above

The chances of someone who has had a cardiac arrest drops by around 10 per cent for every minute that they do not get either CPR or defibrillation.

After ten minutes without either technique, the chances of survival are just 2 per cent at best.

If somebody has a cardiac arrest, an ambulance should be called and CPR attempted.

The BHF advise that if there are more than one person present when someone has had a heart attack, one person should stay with the victim and carry out CPR while the other goes to look for a defibrillator machine – asking emergency services if they are not sure.

Once the defibrillator box is opened, a recorded voice gives easy instructions on where to place pads on a person’s chest.

The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present
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The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present

Users then simply press a large button to start electrical shocks to the person’ s heart.

The defibrillator will not work unless the person is having a cardiac arrest – meaning people cannot make the situation worse by using one.

Previous research has found the survival rate in England for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is 8.6 per cent, compared to 20 per cent in Seattle and 25 per cent in Norway.

A cardiac arrest is commonly caused when a person has a problem with their heart.

The person is unconscious and there are no other signs of life such as breathing or movement.

Ambulance services in England attempt resuscitation on nearly 30,000 people suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest each year.

Only 7 – 8 per cent of people on whom resuscitation is attempted manage to survive to leave hospital.

But the charity wants to raise awareness among the public that survival can be increased to up to 40 per cent through the early use of CPR and defibrillators.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said
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Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said

The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above
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The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above

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Its report, Resuscitation To Recovery, says that simply waiting for the emergency services to arrive means lives are lost that could be saved.

It also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, the report said.

Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, medical director at the BHF, said: ‘Cardiac arrest survival rates in England are disappointingly low and have remained so for many years,

‘There is potential to save thousands of lives but we urgently need to change how we think about cardiac arrest care.

‘It’s clear that we need a revolution in CPR by educating more people in simple lifesaving skills and the use of external defibrillators, and for the subsequent care of a resuscitated patient to be more consistent and streamlined.’

Professor Huon Gray, national clinical director for heart disease at NHS England, said: ‘Thousands of deaths from cardiac arrests could be prevented every year, but we need to work with the public, the emergency services and hospitals in order to achieve this.

‘Currently, there is significant variation in treatment around the country so it is vital that we provide all people with the best possible chances of survival, wherever they live.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4284624/1-000-lives-year-saved-did-aid.html#ixzz4asw90oQ6
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4284624/1-000-lives-year-saved-did-aid.html

First Aid Course (Includes CPR) Northern Beaches, Sydney.

October 23rd, 2016

Saving a life with CPR is ‘really, really easy’ and more of us should try.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/learn-cpr-saving-life-easy-is-really-easy-emergency-experts-says/7247748

If someone’s collapsed, is not responsive and not breathing, would you know what to do?

If a person’s like that, it means their heart’s stopped (which doctors call a cardiac arrest).

It’s not good news.

But if someone around knows what to do, they can save a life. That person can be you.

You can save a life really, really easily.

All you need to do is learn CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Basically, it’s pressing on the person’s chest with your hands.

Once you’ve recognised someone’s heart has stopped, the number one thing to know is that you can’t do any harm.

It’s impossible to hurt someone in cardiac arrest because they’re already dead.

What if you break their ribs? Who cares! Would you rather be alive with a broken rib or dead? It’s that simple.

Can you be sued? Absolutely not. The law is very robust and you won’t be sued for having a go.

Worried about how many breaths to do? Don’t be. Hands only is fine.

All you have to do is press hard and fast in the centre of the chest with the heel of your hand.

If you’re still not sure how fast, Stayin’ Alive from the Bee Gees is about the right beat.

You need to act fast because every minute that goes by without anyone doing anything reduces the odds of survival by 10 per cent.

At 10 minutes, if no-one’s done anything, the person is dead. At about four minutes, irreversible brain damage starts setting in.

So even if an ambulance is called straight away, there’s a good chance help will arrive too late.

But doing CPR means that person may be able to hang on until help arrives. That’s because CPR pushes blood up from the person’s heart into their brain.

Restarting a heart

CPR will help keep someone alive, but restarting a heart needs a defibrillator. Many buildings have portable defibrillators (also known as AEDs) that anyone can use. They give voice instructions to tell you what to do. A helper should always look for one while CPR is done. It’s in your hands.

Some 30,000 people have a cardiac arrest in Australia each year and 90 per cent of them will die.

Cardiac arrest kills more people than lung and breast cancer, trauma and stroke all combined.

It’s not just common and lethal. It’s a problem everyone can do something about right now.

It needs all Australians to learn how to press on someone’s chest.

It needs the two hands at the end of your arms. And that’s it.

Learn Provide First Aid HLTAID003 and Provide CPR HLTAID001 with Simple Instruction at the DYRSL (Dee Why RSL) on the beautiful Northern Beaches. We cater for Northern Beaches locals so they don’t have to travel in to the City of Sydney. Locals from all over the Northern Beaches (Belrose, Avalon, Manly, Dee Why, Brookvale, Balgowlah, Cromer) and the North Shore ( Mosman, Cammeray, Chatswood, North Sydney, Crows Nest) have been raving about Simple Instruction’s First Aid and CPR course since 2009. We are the leading First Aid and CPR provider in Sydney. Book a first aid or CPR course today.

Simple Instruction also partners with www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

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