Archive for the ‘Childcare’ category

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

Northern Beaches First Aid – HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting

March 2nd, 2018

The Northern Beaches community should feel very safe with most child care centers meeting the National Quality standard. With the current figure at 77% and growing year on year, we must make sure our children and families feel safe and the staff have the appropriate training.

If you are a current child care educator or TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care student make sure you book into one of our HLTAID004 Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting training courses today. We are located at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney, and conduct courses on a regular basis. We offer a variety of training courses including HLTAID001 Provide CPR – $55, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – $110 and our tailor HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid training course which includes asthma and anaphylaxis training – $140. Don’t miss out on the cheapest price for first aid training on the Northern Beaches.

https://www.acecqa.gov.au/latest-news/more-three-quarters-education-and-care-services-rated-meeting-national-quality-standard

Thursday, 8 February 2018
ACECQA today announced that 94% of all children’s education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework (NQF) have received a quality rating, with 77% rated at ‘Meeting National Quality Standard’ (NQS) or above (as at 31 December 2017).

“In the last five years, the proportion of services rated at ‘Meeting NQS’ or above has risen from 59% to 65%, 69%, 72% and now 77%”, said ACECQA CEO Gabrielle Sinclair.

“Continuous quality improvement is one of the core objectives of the National Quality Framework. It is very pleasing to see this year-on-year improvement in service quality”, added Ms Sinclair.

Key findings from ACECQA’s NQF Snapshot include:

94% (14,687) of approved education and care services have a quality rating
77% (11,253) of rated services have an overall quality rating of ‘Meeting NQS’ or above
40% (1373) of services rated at ‘Working Towards NQS’ do not meet five or fewer of the 58 elements of quality
3776 quality rating reassessments have been completed
Of the 2700 reassessments of services rated ‘Working Towards NQS’, 68% (1827) resulted in a higher overall quality rating.
The findings are published in full on the ACECQA website: acecqa.gov.au/nqf/snapshots

On 1 February 2018, a revised version of the NQS came into effect, which reduced the number of standards from 18 to 15, and the number of elements from 58 to 40. All education and care services will be quality assessed and rated against the revised NQS from 1 February onwards.

Parents and carers are encouraged to visit Starting Blocks for more information about their local education and care services.

Education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework include long day care, outside school hours care and family day care services, as well as most preschools/kindergartens.

All course offered under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Free First Aid manual, online First Aid workbook, free CPR chart and free CPR mask

February 24th, 2018

The Northern Beaches most trusted first aid and CPR training provider. Since 2009 Simple Instruction has been providing accredited training courses both public an private to the Northern Beaches community. Our most popular courses being the Provide First Aid course HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and our Child care educators course – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

When booking a course with Simple Instruction you receive a Free First Aid manual, online First Aid workbook, free CPR chart, free CPR mask and a free First App. All courses are held on the Northern Beaches, Sydney at the Dee Why RSL and are conducted by local trainers who know the area.

Book a First Aid or CPR training course with Simple instruction today and you will make the Northern Beaches a safer place for you and your family.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the Auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

First Aid and CPR Training Classes Near Me!

January 30th, 2018

Sydney’s Northern Beaches is a popular location due to its beautiful beaches. With summer in full swing and with school classes returning to normality its time to be trained in first aid and CPR. Simple Instruction conducts HLTAID003 Provide First Aid, Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting (HLTAID004) and HLTAID001 Provide CPR at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney or we provide private classes and can come to your workplace or house. We have been a part of the Northern Beaches community for the last nine years and enjoy being near our clients.

Book a first aid or CPR course online through our website www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

BIG Freeze – Northern Beaches Ticks

November 21st, 2017

Simple Instruction loves promoting a great product and wants all Northern Beaches people to know about the recommended way to use First Aid and remove ticks. Please remember that child care workers HLTAID004 are not able to remove ticks or splinter in child care centres.

Scientist and gardener invents product to snap freeze ticks
Julie Cross, Manly Daily
November 19, 2017 12:30am
New research backs ‘freeze, don’t squeeze’
Mum almost dies after eating meat pie
A WOMAN who has suffered multiple tick bites while visiting the northern beaches believes she has invented a product which can freeze and kill them safely.

Peggy Douglass, 61, said her experience with ticks drove her to create a product to deal with the potentially life-threatening parasite.

Having trained in microbiology and chemistry, working for the Australian National University and then in food regulation bodies in the Commonwealth Government, she devised a pocket-sized solution, called Tick Tox.

It’s a simple aerosol can the size of a small deodorant tube. With one squirt it can snap freeze the tick.

Peggy Douglass has found herself covered in ticks after visits to family living on the northern beaches. Now she has produced a product called Tick Tox to kill them. Picture: Adam Yip
“In the old days I used to just pull them out,” Ms Douglass said.

“Sometimes I’d have 20 or more after working in my aunt’s garden in Palm Beach.

“Once I went home with 43.

“But having heard the advice that we should ‘freeze it, not squeeze it’, I looked around but found nothing that was specifically for ticks.”

At the moment tick experts advise people to use a freezing agent from the chemist.

The only ones available are for other conditions such as warts or tags.

Ms Douglass, who lives in Canberra, said hers is essentially the same product as those, but the applicator is smaller and more precise.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital, recently revealed results from a study looking at the best way to remove a tick.

He said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

Dr Andy Ratchford at Mona Vale Hospital Emergency department. Picture: Adam Yip
He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Prof van Nunen said she could not comment on the product Tick Tox, but would be looking at it with other members of Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness, TIARA, at their next meeting.

Tick Tox is currently on sale online at ticktox.com.au or from chemists in Avalon and Mona Vale.

Peggy Douglass with her product Tick Tox. Picture: Adam Yip.
HOW TO REMOVE A TICK
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off.

If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Book in for a Simple Instruction First Aid or CPR course for November, December, and January 2018. We have Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 at the Dee Why RSL. Book online

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

Provide First Aid Certificate (Formerly Apply and Senior First Aid)

October 23rd, 2017

Apply the first aid knowledge you learn from a Simple Instruction Provide First Aid and CPR course held at the Dee Why RSL on the beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney NSW. Simple Instruction is the leading HLTAID001 (Provide CPR), HLTAID003 (Provide First Aid) and HLTAID004 (Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting(childcare first aid)) in Sydney and love working with our Northern Beaches locals to make the Manly Warringah area a safe place.

We offer courses to all our locals and will attend private course across Sydney. More recently we ahve completed courses in Avalon, Balgowlah, Brookvale, Belrose, Manly, Narrabeen, Dee Why, Mona Vale, Frenchs Foorest, Mosman, Cremorne, North Sydney and Cammeray. We tailor our course to all industries and love attending our local business partners in fitness, health and many more.

By updating your first aid an CPR skills you are helping those close to you including family (baby), workmates and friends. Apply the knowledge that you learn in our relevant, fun, easy, online, cheap and energetic course to real life scenarios.

Allen’s Training is our RTO 90909 and we conduct all courses under their auspices. Do better than St John’s!

Find your White card online – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid and CPR (includes Asthma and Anaphylaxis)

October 23rd, 2017

The Northern Beaches of Sydney’s number 1 course provider for HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training courses under ACECQA standards. Simple Instruction prides its on delivering fast, efficient, online and cost effective First Aid courses.

Simple Instruction has reduced its childcare first aid HLTAID004 costs to $130 per person and have courses being conducted at the Dee Why RSL on a weekly basis.

Simple Instruction will also come to your Childcare, workplace, or home and deliver courses at a time that suits you.

Being the best first aid course in Sydney we have also reduced our prices in the Provide First Aid Course to $100 per person and our Provide CPR HLTAID001 (Formerly Apply First Aid) training course to $55 per person. With the reduction in price we have seen and increase in numbers at the course so please book today. Belrose

Allen’s Training is our co-provider and we deliver courses under the banner of their RTO 90909.

Book today – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Looking for a white card course – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Provide First Aid training course on the Northern Beaches (CPR included)

July 24th, 2017

Apply your first aid knowledge by completing a provide first aid or provide CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL.

As an added bonus for all the public on the Northern Beaches we are offering the following discount to our training courses:

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 – $100 (includes CPR, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide CPR HLTAID001 – $55 ( includes a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 – $130 (includes CPR, asthma and anaphylaxis course, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Simple Instruction is re-known for our fast, efficient, friendly and inviting courses. The online learning platform makes the pre-course work easy and students keep coming back to the courses.

Book a private course or come to a public course at the Dee Why RSL.

 

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