Archive for the ‘Childcare’ category

BIG Freeze – Northern Beaches Ticks

November 21st, 2017

Simple Instruction loves promoting a great product and wants all Northern Beaches people to know about the recommended way to use First Aid and remove ticks. Please remember that child care workers HLTAID004 are not able to remove ticks or splinter in child care centres.

Scientist and gardener invents product to snap freeze ticks
Julie Cross, Manly Daily
November 19, 2017 12:30am
New research backs ‘freeze, don’t squeeze’
Mum almost dies after eating meat pie
A WOMAN who has suffered multiple tick bites while visiting the northern beaches believes she has invented a product which can freeze and kill them safely.

Peggy Douglass, 61, said her experience with ticks drove her to create a product to deal with the potentially life-threatening parasite.

Having trained in microbiology and chemistry, working for the Australian National University and then in food regulation bodies in the Commonwealth Government, she devised a pocket-sized solution, called Tick Tox.

It’s a simple aerosol can the size of a small deodorant tube. With one squirt it can snap freeze the tick.

Peggy Douglass has found herself covered in ticks after visits to family living on the northern beaches. Now she has produced a product called Tick Tox to kill them. Picture: Adam Yip
“In the old days I used to just pull them out,” Ms Douglass said.

“Sometimes I’d have 20 or more after working in my aunt’s garden in Palm Beach.

“Once I went home with 43.

“But having heard the advice that we should ‘freeze it, not squeeze it’, I looked around but found nothing that was specifically for ticks.”

At the moment tick experts advise people to use a freezing agent from the chemist.

The only ones available are for other conditions such as warts or tags.

Ms Douglass, who lives in Canberra, said hers is essentially the same product as those, but the applicator is smaller and more precise.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital, recently revealed results from a study looking at the best way to remove a tick.

He said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

Dr Andy Ratchford at Mona Vale Hospital Emergency department. Picture: Adam Yip
He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Prof van Nunen said she could not comment on the product Tick Tox, but would be looking at it with other members of Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness, TIARA, at their next meeting.

Tick Tox is currently on sale online at ticktox.com.au or from chemists in Avalon and Mona Vale.

Peggy Douglass with her product Tick Tox. Picture: Adam Yip.
HOW TO REMOVE A TICK
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off.

If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Book in for a Simple Instruction First Aid or CPR course for November, December, and January 2018. We have Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 at the Dee Why RSL. Book online

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

Provide First Aid Certificate (Formerly Apply and Senior First Aid)

October 23rd, 2017

Apply the first aid knowledge you learn from a Simple Instruction Provide First Aid and CPR course held at the Dee Why RSL on the beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney NSW. Simple Instruction is the leading HLTAID001 (Provide CPR), HLTAID003 (Provide First Aid) and HLTAID004 (Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting(childcare first aid)) in Sydney and love working with our Northern Beaches locals to make the Manly Warringah area a safe place.

We offer courses to all our locals and will attend private course across Sydney. More recently we ahve completed courses in Avalon, Balgowlah, Brookvale, Belrose, Manly, Narrabeen, Dee Why, Mona Vale, Frenchs Foorest, Mosman, Cremorne, North Sydney and Cammeray. We tailor our course to all industries and love attending our local business partners in fitness, health and many more.

By updating your first aid an CPR skills you are helping those close to you including family (baby), workmates and friends. Apply the knowledge that you learn in our relevant, fun, easy, online, cheap and energetic course to real life scenarios.

Allen’s Training is our RTO 90909 and we conduct all courses under their auspices. Do better than St John’s!

Find your White card online – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid and CPR (includes Asthma and Anaphylaxis)

October 23rd, 2017

The Northern Beaches of Sydney’s number 1 course provider for HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training courses under ACECQA standards. Simple Instruction prides its on delivering fast, efficient, online and cost effective First Aid courses.

Simple Instruction has reduced its childcare first aid HLTAID004 costs to $130 per person and have courses being conducted at the Dee Why RSL on a weekly basis.

Simple Instruction will also come to your Childcare, workplace, or home and deliver courses at a time that suits you.

Being the best first aid course in Sydney we have also reduced our prices in the Provide First Aid Course to $100 per person and our Provide CPR HLTAID001 (Formerly Apply First Aid) training course to $55 per person. With the reduction in price we have seen and increase in numbers at the course so please book today. Belrose

Allen’s Training is our co-provider and we deliver courses under the banner of their RTO 90909.

Book today – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Looking for a white card course – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Provide First Aid training course on the Northern Beaches (CPR included)

July 24th, 2017

Apply your first aid knowledge by completing a provide first aid or provide CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL.

As an added bonus for all the public on the Northern Beaches we are offering the following discount to our training courses:

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 – $100 (includes CPR, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide CPR HLTAID001 – $55 ( includes a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 – $130 (includes CPR, asthma and anaphylaxis course, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Simple Instruction is re-known for our fast, efficient, friendly and inviting courses. The online learning platform makes the pre-course work easy and students keep coming back to the courses.

Book a private course or come to a public course at the Dee Why RSL.

 

Dee Why, Northern Beaches, Sydney – HLTAID004 Training Course

July 10th, 2017

Dee Why RSL is centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Simple Instruction is conducting public First Aid and CPR courses every 5 days during the month of July and August. Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 course is for anyone in the childcare industry and covers the asthma and anaphylaxis components as well as the first aid and CPR components.

The HLTAID004 course has been price reduced for this financial year as we have seen an increase in childcare professionals taking up the opportunity. Our Registered Training Organisation RTO Allen’s Training has also reduced their costs to Simple Instruction and we have passed this onto our TAFE and child care Certificate 3 graduates.

We look forward to all child care centres taking up the opportunity to be trained by Simple Instruction in the HLTAID004 and look forward to continuing to support the Northern Beaches community. Simple Instruction also comes to your child care centre or pre school at a time that suits you.

 

What’s On? Northern Beaches Council Events – School holidays

June 30th, 2017

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 training courses provided by Simple Instruction are on some of the things happening in the July School Holidays.

All public courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) and is centrally located to cater for all suburbs from Brookvale to Avalon, Manly to Belrose and Freshwater to Mona Vale. All courses are accredited through Allen’s Training.

Simple Instruction is a proud Northern Beaches, Sydney business and want to ensure we have a safe community. Please ensure you are safe these school holidays and get trained in First Aid or CPR. Private courses are available!

If you are looking for things to do it might be wise to have a ‘staycation’ and look at the Northern Beaches Council link listed below.

http://thingstodo.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/whats-on/event-calendar

Accredited Childcare First Aid Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney.

April 9th, 2017

CHILDCARE workers with fraudulent first aid certificates are risking kids’ lives, the childcare watchdog has warned the federal government.

The Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) has blown the whistle on dodgy training colleges for handing out qualifications to incompetent students.

It says state childcare regulators have expressed fears that some childcare workers with first aid certificates have no idea of what to do in a medical emergency.

All staff in family daycare, and at least one carer in each long daycare centre, must be trained in first aid, anaphylaxis and asthma management.

“A situation where a student has completed one qualification and is incorrectly deemed competent, could present a serious and significant risk to children being educated and cared for,’’ ACECQA warns in a submission to the Department of Education and Training.

“A … failure of graduates to properly administer first aid to children in their care in times of emergency carries a high risk to children and could have life-threatening consequences.’’

ACECQA also criticises the poor English skills of some childcare workers and calls for mandatory literacy tests before students graduate.

It says childcare centres have complained about qualified staff who “do not possess the basic literacy skills expected of them’’.

The Australian Childcare Alliance (ACA) of private daycare centres also demanded the federal Education Department to take “bold action’’ against training colleges that fail to properly train staff.

“The very nature of the industry evolves around very young and, as such, vulnerable children who are reliant on the competency and skills of their educators,’’ it said.

NSW Early Childhood Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said the state government would “use the full extent of the law’’ to deal with dodgy childcare qualifications.

“Services and individuals that have submitted fraudulent documentation will be investigated and can be prosecuted,’’ she said.

Simple Instruction offers HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid Training and our regular HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR training courses. All courses are accredited and meet the ACECQA standards. Book a course on the Northern Beaches at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/kids-lives-at-risk-in-childcare-first-aid-fail/news-story/6d82e16b2691e177db008e7de5b1a061

Provide First Aid and Provide CPR course – relaxed, simple, fun and relevant.

March 26th, 2017

Simple Instruction likes this article about first aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 courses on the Northern Beaches. We hope you enjoy this article as well. We are trying to get the emphasis the importance of first aid training for their staff but this article on explaining first aid to students/kids is great. Simple Instruction first aid courses are designed for adults but we can come to you and complete a basic children’s first aid course or HLTAID004 courses so that they are aware especially of when to call 000. Some great ideas before you attend a first aid or CPR course here though.

“Mom, give me some ice.” Ranvir, 6, and Viraj, 4, hardly ever seem to get along. One can spot them getting on their mother’s nerves on several occasions. “Such is the case with siblings, especially boys, I guess,” says their mom, Smriti.

Last week however, Ranvir surprised his mother when he came running into the kitchen looking for ice. His brother had fallen off the bed and had got a bump on his head.

“Not only did Ranvir cajole Viraj, he even applied ice and an antiseptic cream on the wound,” says Smriti, proudly.

Smriti says that she feels a certain sense of relief knowing that her child is well equipped to be a caregiver in case there’s a need. “These are required skills you know and should not be looked upon as burdening the child.”

It’s comforting to know that children are competent, especially when it comes to first aid. “Nobody can misguide them,” she says. Plus, these are survival strategies that human beings should know.

Knowing first aid can be fascinating for children if we use the right methods. All we need to do is combine learning with our day-to-day slips and falls; our job is done.

Want to know how? Read the following 10 tips:

1) Wounds as stories

“I treat wounds while giving tips.”

Pranali, mother of a four-year-old, explains every step of the first aid that she gives to her child. Recently, he fell down the stairs and bruised his knee.

“I’m cleaning the wound with antiseptic first. This avoids infection,” she said as she started first aid. Then, she went on to explain that after cleaning, she is applying an antiseptic cream.

“I was crossing my fingers because he licks everything,” she chuckles and explains how her son took the tube of cream in his hands and looked at it as she applied.

“Shaurya stops crying and gets distracted when I involve him in doing his own first aid. I think he learns and remembers my tips,” says Pranali.

If you’re comfortable and calm while giving first aid to your child, you can help him/her remain calm during medical emergencies too. Also, you’re teaching first aid.

Sounds cool. Doesn’t it?

2) Replicate

“He’s a lot into superheroes. They thrill him,” says Ashish. His seven-year-old enjoys action-packed films and does not get anxious or scared when he witnesses accidents. That gave Ashish an idea to teach his son about first aid by replicating a few things at home.

“I used socks and cotton balls to display swellings,” when his son had wanted to see what a swelling around a wound looked like. Ashish also showed him the way to tie bandages.

“I put some tomato sauce on my arm, told my son that a wound bleeds like that, and taught him how to bandage it. The sauce made it fun!”

Ashish believes that there’s no harm being realistic with your children. They need to know how the human body reacts during adverse situations so that, god forbid, if they are in similar situations, they know what to do.

Makes sense!

Doctor doctor!3) Play doctor

Well, this is a tried and tested, age-old method that still works. Playing doctor with young kids teaches them a lot about medical emergencies while maintaining a dose of fun.

“I don’t want him to get nightmares about cuts and wounds,” says Anamika. Her son is barely three and they’ve recently bought him a doctor’s kit. Since he wants to learn how to use it, she uses playtime to teach him about first aid.

“I know he is still too young, but I thought why not start now,” she explains.

Children learn fast when they find fun and relaxation in learning which is why Anamika feels that planning out serious first-aid sessions may not work with her son. During his natural urge for playing doctor, she is teaching her son about injuries, falls, and accidents.

“He listens to it like a story. Later, he’ll know better and by then, we’ll have bypassed the fear,” she exclaims.

First aid kit!4) Make a kit

Mumbai-based preschool teacher Jhanvi tells me that making a first-aid kit together is a good way to teach children the uses of each thing that go into the kit.

It also helps them understand that the first-aid kit is to be used in case of an emergency, it isn’t a toy.

“Yes, many times my kids play with the kit and spoil the contents, especially creams. It’s risky but I need to keep the kit easy-to-reach too,” says Dipika, mother to two boys.

Making a kit together will work as a DIY activity as well as a session on the importance of first aid. Try it!

5) The priority list

“My daughter does not have patience to sit and listen. Even if it’s her favourite activity, I cannot make her sit for more than 10 minutes at a stretch.”

Ridhima’s daughter is like any other kid—she lacks patience. Making a priority list of problems where first aid might be required and teaching children about those aspects first, helps curb this problem.

So, what can be included in this list?

Stopping a wound from bleeding
Holding nostrils to stop a nosebleed
Running a burnt body part under water
Putting ice over swellings
“We made a decorated chart with kids where we drew different body parts and basic first aid for them. It was fun,” says Shradha from Notre Dame Academy, Patna.

Why don’t you try making a quick chart or list too?

6) ‘Might’ happen and not ‘will’ happen

“Don’t scare them by saying that these things will happen. That’s key to teaching first aid,” says Dr Thakrey from Mumbai-based Sai Swasthya Clinic.

“Make them feel like superheroes who have the power during any medical emergency,” he says. He explains that describing to children the gory details, plus how important it’s to manage oneself during a medical problem will scare them and first aid should work as a fun tool.

“Kids are smart enough to apply knowledge when needed, we need not push it,” he concludes.

7) All that breaks

“I introduced him to first aid for fractures by using a doll. By slowly bending the doll’s limbs, I spoke about cracked bones and he listened to me, mesmerised,” says Sheena.

Sheena is a dentist who is currently a stay-at-home mom. She enjoys passing on her medical knowledge to her six-year-old.

Sheena says that talking to kids about bones and blood supply grabs their interest. “These things are real and there’s a lot of fun in reality,” she says. She has explained to her son that when bones get hurt, blood oozes out from them, which is why they hurt so much.

In these times, one must be patient with the person who is suffering the pain. Secondly, if he comes across someone who has fallen or is complaining of a hurting bone, he should immediately call another adult to help. Calling for help is also first aid.

First aid for fractures and sprains also means making the person who has fallen sit or lie down in a comfortable position. Not touching the hurting bone is the last, but most important rule.

“Helping out without a first-aid kit also comes under first aid, doesn’t it?” asks Sheena and I agree. Don’t you?

8) Raise an alarm!

“They should know that calling an adult to help is sometimes the best help they can provide,” says Dr Thakrey.

Shalini, a marketing executive with a cosmetics firm and mother of two, says that children should be taught to raise an alarm. It’s not their job to assess a situation. By raising alarms during medical emergencies, they will help themselves out of the situation and help the person in need too.

So, teach them to raise an alarm!

9) Mind over matter!

“We dropped him and went grocery shopping next door. Our cell phones were out of reach in that basement shop. He managed alone!”

Swayam had hurt himself at the football field and was feeling faint after that. His coach did some first aid and thereafter, tried calling Swayam’s parents. He was not able to get across to them, but felt helpless since the rest of the team of six-year-olds could not have been left unattended.

While Swayam sat in a corner and waited for his parents, he decided to breathe and stay calm. He pulled out his napkin and pressed his wounds till he felt better.

“We arrived and panicked when we saw the coach panicking around him. But our son stayed calm,” say Swayam’s parents.

They add that we might not always have resources for first aid and even if we have them, they may not work if there is no presence of mind. So along with first aid, teach your kids to employ their minds too!

10) A kid is but a kid!

“Every time I talk about first aid, I talk about personal safety first,” says Swati.

She believes that the safety of her two sons is more important than them helping out. “You can’t jump into a pool to save someone even if you know how to swim,” she tells her kids.

Dr Thakrey says, “Kids are taught first aid to help. That does not mean that they fix other’s problems on their own. They also need to be taught whether a situation demands first aid or not.”

“Getting close to open wires, people who have burnt themselves, or someone injured on the road is not the business of kids,” he adds

“I don’t talk to my sons about all the scary things that might happen,” says Swati.

Don’t you think she’s right? Children need not worry about consequences as they learn first aid. All they need to focus on is that knowledge is fun and that they can help themselves if certain situations arise.

As they say, knowledge is power!

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