Archive for the ‘Children’s Hospital’ category

Northern Beaches Hospital – Mona Vale Tick First Aid

November 5th, 2017

IN a world first, a northern beaches hospital has conducted research into the safest way to remove a tick.

First Aid for Tick removal provided in Simple Instruction First Aid training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital who was involved in the study, said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life-threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

“Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal. If you can remove the tick and decrease your chances of getting a reaction then that is important,” Dr Ratchford said.

Dr Ratchford said the advice was critical for those living on the northern beaches which was a known tick hotspot.

He said at Mona Vale Hospital they were seeing a year-on-year rise in tick related emergencies.

As well as dealing with minor reactions to tick bites, they were also seeing patients with cellulitis, tick typhus and those with life-threatening anaphylaxis caused by an allergy to a tick or to meat, brought on by a tick bite.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Last December an Avalon dad told the Manly Daily how he was left fearing for his life when his throat started to close up and his eyes and tongue turned black, after his wife pulled out a tick in his neck with her fingertips.

Mona Vale doctors had to give 53-year-old wool trader Michael Kiernan three emergency shots of adrenaline to help him breathe in the terrifying ordeal. Despite being bitten many times by ticks, he had never had a reaction before. Now he has to carry an lifesaving Epipen in case he gets another tick.

Michael Kiernan was left fearing for his life after a tick bite turned his eyes and tongue black.
Dr Ratchford said they saw most of their tick patients between July and December, as that was when the adult female needs its last blood meal before producing offspring.

He said during this period around two per cent of all cases at Mona Vale’s emergency department were tick-related, which was high.

The study looked at 124 patients between July and December in 2016. He said that didn’t include everyone who came to emergency with a tick bite, but a large sample of patients with tick issues.

Dr Ratchford said those on the frontline of tick emergencies had been advising people to freeze not squeeze ticks for some time.

One of the ticks removed from patients at Mona Vale Hospital. Picture: Adam Yip
However, without research to back it up health authorities have been reluctant to promote the method.

“There’s so much conflicting evidence out there on how to remove ticks, it’s a minefield,” he said.

“This is the first research looking at the best way to remove ticks.”

He said he would be submitting his research to journals in the hope of getting the information out there.

HOW TO REMOVE A TICK:
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off. If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Warning for parents: Do you know what to do if your child starts choking?

November 15th, 2015

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/warning-for-parents-do-you-know-what-to-do-if-your-child-starts-choking/story-fni0cx12-1227607619027
November 15, 2015 12:00am
Jane HansenThe Sunday Telegraph

Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. We have courses conducted at the DY RSL at Dee Why which is a central location for the Northern Beaches. Make a payment online today.

WATCHING a few first aid videos on YouTube was all that stood between Claudine Thomas and her daughter Luciana choking to death.
“Mums around me had been telling me to do a first aid course and I hadn’t got around to it but I had watched YouTube videos to get the basics,” Ms Thomas said.

“I put her over my knee, supported her head and hit her back three times and out came this 5cm piece of grout. I was shocked and I still called an ambulance.”

Choking killed three NSW children last year and, with the peak season for choking coming up, doctors are warning that parents must be prepared, not wait until they are in the middle of a life or death situation.

“It’s a frightening event and you can’t check the internet then on what to do, you need to know beforehand what to do,” Dr John Curotta, from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, said.

The approaching festive season is a peak time for choking incidents, he said.

“A few years ago we had 10 cases coming up to Christmas. There’s Christmas parties, party food like nuts and stuff left behind like Lego and kids will swallow anything because they like to test taste things and test things with their mouths,” Dr Curotta said.

In Luciana’s case, it was a piece of loose tile grout.

Luciana, 13 months, almost choked on a piece of tile grout but her mother Claudine saved her. Picture: Justin Lloyd
The pair had been in the bathroom of their Parramatta home, brushing their teeth. Ms Thomas was distracted for only a moment. The next thing she knew, her child was choking.

“I heard this choking sound and I grabbed her and she was red and blue,” Ms Thomas, 31, said.

Luciana is now fine but Dr Curotta said parents cannot be complacent.

Thanks to Hollywood, he said most people mistakenly think the Heimlich manoeuvre, where you squeeze a child from behind and push their stomachs, is the correct technique.

“Heimlich is in everyone’s mind but it’s not the technique recommended and there’s remarkably little evidence that it works,” he said.“If the child is coughing but still breathing, the best thing to do is quiet them down and call the ambulance with no sudden moves, you don’t want to dislodge the object to a more dangerous position.

“If the child is blue and not breathing, the best thing to do is put the child across you knee with their head down lower than their chest and deliver four sharp blows between the shoulder blades.

“You have gravity helping and the chest on your knees so you are getting good pressure to get air to blast things out.

“If that doesn’t work, put your fingers down the child’s throat and by then you or someone else should call Triple-0.”

Choking is mainly caused by the inhalation of food, followed by inhalation of other foreign bodies. Small airways can easily become blocked or compressed.

CHOKING: WHAT TO DO

■ If child is choking, check first if the child is still able to breathe, cough or cry. Child may be able to dislodge the foreign object by coughing

■ If the child IS breathing, do not try to dislodge the foreign object by hitting the child on the back because this may move the food into a more dangerous position and make the child stop breathing. Phone Triple-0 for an ambulance

■ If the child is NOT breathing try to dislodge the foreign object by placing the child face down over your lap so that their head is lower than their chest and give the child four sharp blows on the back just between the shoulder blades. This should provide enough force to dislodge the foreign object

■ Check again for breathing. If the child is still not breathing, urgently call Triple-0 and ask for an ambulance. The ambulance service will tell you what to do next

Northern Beaches CPR Course – Save a life this summer!

November 2nd, 2015

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/how-to-save-a-life-knowing-cpr-saves-more-children-from-near-drownings-new-study-reveals/story-fni0cx12-1227483454464?sv=e8dd29ceba225f66f425fb112b6aa7c1

A CHILD is four times more likely to survive a near drowning if parents know CPR and start it straight away, a new study has found.

The NSW Study of Drowning and Near Drowning in Children analysed hospital presentations and admissions from The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick and John Hunter Children’s Hospital.

Of the 60 families interviewed, 90 per cent of children received cardiopulmonary resuscitation following a near drowning.

Professor Danny Cass, Trauma Surgeon at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, said the study showed early intervention was a lifesaver.

“Early CPR has been shown to contribute to greater survival rates with four times as many positive health outcomes,” he said.

“For many years the community has been told any form of CPR is better than no form of CPR and it is heartening to see the message getting through.

Six children died in NSW from drowning in the past year.

“Thirty years ago it was 20 deaths a year and while six is still too many, we think the high rate of CPR has reduced deaths overall,” Prof Cass said.

Although formal CPR training and annual refresher courses were found to be low, most children who needed CPR received it immediately following the drowning.

For three years The Sunday Telegraph and The Daily Telegraph have been campaigning to have compulsory CPR taught in high schools.

Backed by Royal Lifesaving Australia and St John Ambulance, we renew our call to include CPR in the national curriculum.

The Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) recommends CPR refresher classes every 12 months and emphasises that “any attempt at resuscitation is better than no attempt”.

But Prof Cass said children should be learning CPR in schools and all new parents should either learn or turn to You Tube to find out how to perform CPR.

“I think if it is taught in school it is ideal, but I am amazed how good some of the You Tube ones are, it’s a revolution in education,” he said.

Prof Cass specifically mentioned the Vinnie Jones Hard and Fast YouTube video released by the British Heart Foundation as particularly good.

Drownings in NSW

In 2012-2013, there were a total of 89 hospital admissions from drowning in NSW

* 78% were aged 0-4

* 56% had a near drowning while in the pool with a carer or supervisor

The most common locations included:

Swimming pools (58%); baths (21%); public pools (15%)

* 48% of all the children previously had swimming lessons

* 56% of children 0-4 who had a near drowning in a backyard pool were let into the pool area by a parent/carer and then experienced a near drowning due to a lapse in supervision

* 22% of children 0-4 who had a near drowning in a backyard pool gained access to swimming pool through a propped-open gate

Source: NSW Study of Drowning and Near Drowning in Children (0-16) by Kids Health and The Centre for Trauma Care, Prevention, Education and Research at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

The study also found that more than half the children age between 0 and 4 years old were let into the pool area by a carer or supervisor, but a lapse of supervision led to the near drowning.

“The biggest message is supervision which means continuous, undivided attention, 56 per cent of parents thought they were supervising,” Prof Cass said.

Central Coast mother-of-two Rachelle Highton was sitting in the pool area with her son and her three-year-old daughter Emily when the toddler quietly slipped under the water.

“We were sitting on the side of the pool and it was literally 30 seconds and I looked over and Emily was floating face down and was blue,” Ms Highton said.

“I pulled her out and started CPR, it seemed to take a lifetime but she ended up coming around,” the trained nurse said.

“I did not hear her at all, it was so silent, we want people to be aware it was so quick and so quiet and just luckily I can do CPR.”

One in four children in the 0-4 age group also gained access to the pool area because the gate was propped open.

Almost half had had swimming lessons and 45 per cent had water in the lungs, even those who were under the water for less than a minute.

Six out of 10 of the near drownings occurred in a private pool.

Simple Instruction conducts all courses at the Dee Why RSL and welcomes new clients and existing clients to book in the coming months. Get trained and help others in our Northern Beaches and Sydney community to ensure we have a safer community.

Sydney boy, 8, saves mum’s life. – Save a Life by learning Apply First Aid HLTFA311A and Perform CPR HLTCPR211A.

August 20th, 2012

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8519180/sydney-boy-8-saves-mums-life

Audio has been released of an eight-year-old Sydney boy successfully reviving his unconscious mother while following the advice of a Triple Zero operator.

Braydon Thomas has been presented with a bravery award after saving his mother’s life in December 2011.

WATCH MORE: Boy honoured for saving mum

The Leumeah boy was dropped back home after attending a Christmas party to find his mother Kelly Gawthorne lying unconscious on the bathroom floor, not breathing.

“I didn’t know if she was tired so she’d laid on the floor,” Braydon told Nine News.

“She doesn’t like her toes being touched so I touched her toes but she still didn’t wake up.”

Braydon called his father who rang Triple Zero as he made his way to the home.

As Braydon waited for paramedics to arrive, ambulance operator Marianne Phillips called him to talk him through CPR.

After his father arrived, Braydon then relayed instructions from Ms Phillips until she began breathing and regained consciousness.

Braydon was presented with the Ambulance Star Award in front of his classmates at Leumeah Public School in Sydney’s southwest earlier today.

Sources: Nine News, Ambulance Service of NSW
Author: Nick Pearson, Approving editor: Matthew Henry

Book yourself in to an Apply First Aid HLTFA311A or Perform CPR HLTCPR211A course with Simple Instruction at The Brookvale Hotel on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Save a life today.

 

Asthma Council Australia – Blue Butterfly Program

July 10th, 2012

At the National Asthma Council Australia, we know that if you are one of the 7 million Australians with allergy or the 2 million with asthma, you want to know how you could improve the health and wellbeing of you and your family. That’s why we developed the Sensitive Choice® program.

Our Sensitive Choice® blue butterfly symbol is a way of recognising products and services from companies that support asthma and allergy care. Products that carry the blue butterfly may be better choices for people with asthma and allergies.

The Sensitive Choice® program has over 200 products and services carrying the blue butterfly. Through a partnership between the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation of New Zealand and the National Asthma Council Australia, New Zealanders are also able to benefit from this program.

The program is a type of sponsorship program, although approved products and services must satisfy our independent Product Advisory Panel they do no harm and may offer relative benefits to people with asthma or allergies.

If you see the blue butterfly when shopping, stop for a moment and think about your family’s asthma and allergy care.

  • Do you know your triggers?
  • Are you taking steps to reduce your exposure to your triggers?
  • Have you had an asthma and allergy review with your doctor recently?
  • Do you follow your asthma or allergy action plan?

To learn more about the National Asthma Council Australia, please visit our website: www.nationalasthma.org.au

To learn more about the program and to discuss whether your product may be suitable, please contact:

Adam Trumble Email: adam.trumble@nationalasthma.org.au

CPR and First Aid in Schools

January 30th, 2012

Brittney Kleyn

THE shores of Summer Bay are never far from a little beachside drama – but when
it comes to water safety, the stars of Home and Away aren’t taking any chances.

The cast of the popular Australian show have thrown their support behind The
Daily Telegraph’s campaign to bring compulsory certified CPR training into high
schools.

Sign
our petition for certified CPR training in NSW
schools

When Axle Whitehead, who plays Liam Murphy on the show, found himself having
to rescue a tourist at Bondi
Beach
, he was thankful for the basic training he had received as a kid.

“I’ve witnessed it first hand and learning the old CPR, I think it’s
absolutely imperative for that one time when you need it,” he said.

Recommended Coverage

 

CERTIFIED CPR training could be provided to school
students for less than $40m a year – and lifesaving groups said there were
options to cut the cost.
THE face of road trauma prevention – now Associate
Professor Brian Owler backs The Daily Telegraph’s push for CPR in the national
school curriculum.
FOOTY players put their bodies on the line week in,
week out, but their injuries on the paddock can rarely be described as
life-threatening.
NO one knows how important CPR is more than doctors
– even the juniors, and a new batch of them are learning it this week at St
George Hospital.
LIFESAVING CPR must be taught in the nation’s
schools. Join our campaign backed by Royal Life Saving Australia and St John
Ambulance.
THE Parents and Citizens Association has supported
The Daily Telegraph’s popular campaign for certified CPR training for all
students.
NATIONAL curriculum writers will consider including
mandatory CPR lessons in all schools in the wake of a campaign by The Daily
Telegraph.

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s like learning how to draw or spell and as Australians we spend so much
time in the water. It is so important.”

His on-screen girlfriend Bianca Scott, played by Lisa Gormley, emphasised the
necessity of knowing the basics before heading out into the water.

“I just think it’s vital. It’s a good confidence thing for yourself as well –
knowing if something happens you have some knowledge of how to deal with it,”
she said.

Home and Away’s Samara Weaving said it was important for CPR training to
start young.

“Even if kids are just aware and learning the basics, things happen and they
need to know these vital skills.” she said.

With lifeguards always on the set, Weaving said it put the cast at ease
knowing someone experienced had their back.

“CPR skills aren’t too hard to teach. Not when you compare it to how useful
they are should that situation ever come up,” she said.

Now in its 24th season, the stars of the Channel 7 series said there was lots
of drama in store for the residents of Summer Bay.

“We’ve pulled the trigger. It’s a really exciting first half of the year for
all our characters. A lot of juicy stuff to come,” Whitehead said.

“Our characters are in a good place, for now that is. I guess it’s a case of
stayed tuned.”

Gormley said it was a privilege to be part of such a successful, long-running
program.

“It’s absolutely amazing. They are such a well-oiled machine and they’ve been
going so well for so long,” she said.

Simple Instruction is supporting this iniative to get CPR and First Aid into schools. Simple Instruction has been conducting courses for schools on the Northern Beaches and around Sydney for the past 2 years. Schools such as Narrabeen Sports High School, Barrenjoey High School, Ryde Secondary College, Hunters Hill High School, Balgowlah Boys High School and Mascot High School have taken this opportunity to increase the safety in the school with training to over 300 students and teachers in First Aid and CPR.

Simple instruction also has public Apply First Aid and Perform CPR courses most Saturdays at The Brookvale Hotel for anyone who would like to come along in 2012.

First Aid and CPR Saves Lives

November 17th, 2011

Bystanders often feel helpless when they see somebody collapse or get injured, but knowing just a little about the basics could transform the chances of survival, writes Lissa Christopher

The young marathon runner was still lying face down and showed no signs of life when Penelope Little arrived.

“As soon as I rolled him over it was very obvious … he wasn’t breathing and … I could tell pretty quickly he needed CPR [cardio pulmonary resuscitation],” the NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said. There were lots of people around but no one had tried to turn him over, let alone start CPR. They’d called for help and left it at that.

“At a bare minimum they should have rolled him onto his side, into the recovery position,” she says. “You should never leave someone lying face down. But this man required CPR and the fact that nobody gave it to him – it was alarming. It was like, ‘come on, people!’ This man is obviously unwell.”

It’s common for bystanders to do nothing when someone has collapsed and wait for “someone in a uniform” to turn up. Studies from the US have shown that the primary reason bystanders don’t attempt CPR is fear of not doing it correctly but, as Harvard Medical School states in its public health guides, “Poor CPR is better than no CPR” (see box).

”People don’t realise that the role of a bystander is actually very important,” Little says. “Particularly in case of CPR. It needs to be done very soon after the person has gone into cardiac arrest. It you have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, your chance of survival is about 3 per cent and the only way you are going to survive is if somebody quickly recognises that you are in cardiac arrest, quickly does CPR and quickly calls an ambulance.”

Presuming CPR requires an expert is probably the most serious first-aid misconception, but as NSW Ambulance and St John Ambulance will attest, there are plenty of others.

Take fainting, for example. It’s common for well-meaning people to try to get someone who has fainted to sit up. In fact, they should be left lying down.

St John Ambulance deals with a lot of fainting during the Royal Easter Show, Little says, particularly among elderly visitors. It happens everywhere from the showbag pavilion to the scones ”and it’s amazing how many times you get there and someone is trying to prop this woman up on a chair when all she wants to do is faint and lie back on the ground”.

“I often say to people, if a person wants to faint, let them do it. In essence, it’s the body trying to fix itself, usually because there’s a problem with their blood pressure.”

Other scenarios where paramedics and St John Ambulance volunteers commonly encounter misapprehensions include bleeding noses, burns, poisoning, penetrating injuries, choking, diabetic coma and seizures.

People often don’t realise that diabetics can lapse into a coma due to high blood sugar as well as low blood sugar, Caroline Woods, an intensive care paramedic with the Ambulance Service of NSW, says. Feeding sugar to someone who is having a high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) attack is only going to make things worse.

“We often find someone lying on the floor with all these lollies hanging out of their mouth,” she says. “Someone has tried their best to help but they’ve got it wrong.”

Little recalls attending to a seven-year-old girl having a seizure and her father had his hand in her mouth, holding onto her tongue in the mistaken belief he was stopping her from swallowing it. “I said to him, ‘take your hand out of her mouth and let her have her seizure’,” she says.

“Never try to hold down someone who is having a seizure,” Woods says. Clear them a space and put something soft under their head if possible. Don’t put anything in their mouth.

It’s not actually possible for someone to swallow their own tongue. People often bite their tongue during a seizure, but they’re highly unlikely to bite through it so don’t panic, she says.

Despite the poor odds, the marathon runner Little found lying face down did survive. Little got to him quite quickly and performed CPR for several minutes, another St John person arrived in minutes with a defibrillator and an ambulance arrived shortly after that. “He was 29 and he made a full recovery,” Little says. “He was a very lucky guy.”

“In my job, you often wish that a bystander had been more helpful. We are so lucky with NSW Ambulance that when you dial 000 they will give you advice over the phone but often people are hysterical or they don’t listen to that advice or they hang up.

“So many times I have thought, ‘please, God, I hope somebody is already doing CPR … because we are not going to be able to save this person unless somebody has started’.”

St John Ambulance runs regular first-aid courses and recommends a CPR refresher every 12 months.

Your closest Apply First Aid and Perform CPR course on The Northern Beaches is at The Brookvale Hotel. Come along and get trained by Simple Instruction and enjoy a fun day out.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/first-aid-and-the-myths-that-cost-lives-20110831-1jlty.html#ixzz1dvo8I1D2

First Aid in the Fitness Industry

August 24th, 2011

Gyms under spotlight after man’s death

Updated August 18, 2011 12:56:00

 Video: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-17/melbourne-gym-death-findings-released/2844062
Coroner calls for first aid training in gyms (7pm TV News VIC)
The coroner has recommended mandatory first-aid training for gym staff.

A Victorian coroner is calling for greater regulation of the
fitness industry after the death of a 29-year-old man at a Melbourne gym.

David Thomas went without CPR immediately after suffering a heart attack in
2007 because there was only one worker on duty and her first-aid training was
out of date.

The coroner found his death was not preventable, but on Wednesday recommended
the State Government introduce regulations for mandatory first-aid training for
gym staff.

Mr Thomas’s sister Jenny Cursio says her family has been fighting for four
years to improve industry regulations.

“We never wanted it to become anything more than a vehicle where we could
make a change,” she said.

The Thomas family’s lawyer, John Cain, says the Government must act
swiftly.

“The clear message from the coroner is that the industry regulation that has
existed to date has failed, it’s inadequate,” he said.

“What the coroner is saying is the Government needs to step in, fill that
void, and introduce some regulations.”

The gym’s owner, Fitness First, supports the move.

Topics: accidents—other, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, courts-and-trials, law-crime-and-justice, melbourne-3000, vic

First posted August 17, 2011 19:33:23

 

Comments (14)

Comments for this story are closed, but you can
still have your say.


  • ABC (Moderator):

    17 Aug 2011 8:29:45pm

    Do you think gyms need tougher regulations?

    Alert moderator


    • hairy nosed wombat:

      17 Aug 2011 9:02:49pm

      All gyms and public swimming pools should have Automated External
      Defibrillators (AEDs). There is very good evidence for this – they would save a
      few lives a year across Australia, and are only a couple of thousand
      dollars.

      Alert moderator


    • TigerLee:

      17 Aug 2011 11:54:59pm

      I’m a regular weight trainer and frequent the gym and believe that everyone
      does need to be sensible and be responsible for themselves. If you know yourself
      and your body well enough and you are honest with yourself then you should know
      your limits, etc. Having said that, there needs to be more guidance in the gym
      and DEFINITELY people with First Aid training on the gym floor – not just one
      person. Not sure that this environment should be too heavily regulated – don’t
      we have enough of that but something needs to happen. Gyms need to be more
      responsible and sensible when it comes to its patrons and their health &
      safety.

      Alert moderator


  • Lindsay Cooper:

    17 Aug 2011 8:39:48pm

    No! We have more than enough regulations now and many of them don’t work
    as intended. Regulations concerning drugs just keep the price up.

    Alert moderator


  • peter of mitcham:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:25pm

    Yes I do! Personally I wouldn’t go anywhere near them but my wife attended
    one of those “women only” gyms. How does that work? Isn’t it against the law to
    discriminate against someone in providing a service on the basis of their
    gender? Anyway this mob was downright dangerous in the pressure they put on
    people. Them and their stupid little school games trying to shame people into
    exercising harder. I think they should be tightly regulated. Take down the “No
    Pain No Gain” signs and put up one that says “A Fitter Person Is Not Necessarily
    A Better Person”

    Alert moderator


  • Founder:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:52pm

    Most of the time I go to the Gym there is no one on duty.
    Will they ban
    the 24 hour gyms?

    People do need to take some responsibility for their
    own lives.

    Alert moderator


    • Michael:

      17 Aug 2011 11:01:16pm

      I completely agree. Let people be responsible for their own decisions. I know
      that I want to be.

      Alert moderator


    • Foundette:

      17 Aug 2011 11:47:19pm

      “People do need to take some responsibility for their own lives.”

      How
      would they do that? By administering first aid to themselves after they’ve
      collapsed?

      Alert moderator


  • Lawrie:

    17 Aug 2011 9:09:56pm

    No! While I don’t use a gym, I run and work out with weights in my own home.
    What ever happened to personal responsibility? Take control of your life. If you
    slip over in a supermarket, you should have taken more care, instead of
    expecting to sue the supermarket for ‘their negligence’. If you have a fatal
    heart attack walking up steps, sad, but that is life.

    Alert moderator


  • Jeppa:

    17 Aug 2011 9:17:12pm

    Gyms do need to take occupational health and safety more seriously than they
    do. They are high risk areas, but there seldom seems to be anyone qualified to
    deal with injuries or illnesses available. At any other high risk workplace, not
    having a staff member with a current first aid certificate would be completely
    unacceptable.

    Whether the government is able to – or even should – change
    the way gym managers choose to run their facilities is another question. A
    better approach would be for consumers to ask serious questions about safety and
    the qualifications of *all* staff before signing up. There are plenty of gyms
    out there to choose from.

    Alert moderator


  • CVL:

    17 Aug 2011 9:28:34pm

    Absolutely – I’ve seen some appalling behaviour from on-duty gym
    “instructors”, from running away to laughing when people have seriously injured
    themselves on the equipment. And then there are those 2-3 hour windows that
    every gym I’ve been a member of has where there are no staff on
    duty.

    Clearly the only way forward is through the threat of government
    sanctions on an organisation and/or an individual.

    Alert moderator


  • rod:

    17 Aug 2011 9:29:30pm

    No

    I suppose first aid training is desirable for anyone, but there is
    no extra risk in a Gym over anything else you do.

    I just think we need
    less rules and more common sense.

    Alert moderator


  • FitnessEmployee:

    17 Aug 2011 9:52:19pm

    In SA, it is an industry standard that gym instructors, personal trainers and
    fitness instructors have up to date CPR and First Aid along with relevant
    qualifications. It is also common sense as fitness facilities have a duty of
    care over all people in their centre, so why wouldn’t a facility ensure staff
    know what they’re doing? Good centres hound their employees when certificates
    fall out of date; even better ones provide training regularly to ensure no one
    has an excuse. I have never worked in a centre that will employ someone without
    first aid and CPR training (and I’ve worked in LOTS of SA fitness facilities).

    I have worked at a centre where a client has died from a heart attack
    and staff were quick to respond and keep the client alive until paremedics
    arrived. Often, despite all the best cues and care and precautions from fitness
    centre staff, people just have heart attacks or other health issues. In the case
    I was exposed to, it was caused by something unpreventable, whether the client
    was at the gym, at home, or at a hospital.

    People do need to accept
    personal responsibility and recognise their boundaries when exercising AND staff
    have a responsibility to provide safe and effective information regarding a
    person’s exercise regieme and known health issues. This is why many choose to
    exercise under supervision of fitness facilities rather than on their
    own.

    If you feel you are not getting this from your fitness centre, ask
    them why, as its a legal requirement (and common sense). It might also be time
    to shop around for another gym!

    Regarding “shaming” participants into
    exercise: every instructor is different, same as doctors, nurses, physios,
    lawyers, etc. and if you don’t like their personality, try another instructor.
    Some do use pushier techniques (like what you imagine or see on TV), but more
    use motivational psychology and encouragement as these are proven to get better
    long-term results which ultimately serves the industry better and provides job
    security!

    Alert moderator


  • Teubes:

    17 Aug 2011 10:31:21pm

    The gym supports it ? if I owned the gym I would of already trained all staff
    in 1st aid and installed AEDs. A big gym like fitness first should already have
    this in place. You would think, wouldn’t you ?

    Alert moderator

Manly Daily – 09/08/11

August 10th, 2011

Why our children have ADHD, allergies and anxiety

8 Aug 11 @  06:00pm by Carleen Frost

PARENTS are being urged to get back to basics and lead a more “primitive” lifestyle to boost their child’s health and happiness.

Narrabeen Dr Robyn Cosford said returning to “real” food, avoiding artificial light and switching off wireless internet were the first steps she recommended to her patients, particularly those with behavioural problems.

Dr Cosford believes wireless internet and other household appliances could be changing the function of the brain.

“The first thing that we try to get our parents to do is getting their kids to eat all real foods – no more processed or packaged foods,” she said.

“We have this very strong tendency for the diet to be predominantly wheat and sugar-based, so it’s not uncommon that the children have an adverse reaction to those foods.

“A true food allergy is not that common. Food intolerance or food insensitivity is very common.”

Dr Cosford, the founder of the Northern Beaches Care Centre, will address the Mindd Foundation’s International Forum on Children in Randwick this weekend.

The forum will focus on the links between nutrition and lifestyle and conditions such as ADHD, allergies, anxiety and digestive problems.

She said her message would be about “restoring” lifestyles.

“The environment is increasingly toxic and more and more people are having a problem,” she said.

“We have to get back to going outside and connecting with the Earth and cutting out all this artificial light.

“If people could do these basics, straight away they will find a significant change in their child’s behaviours.”

DOCTOR’S TIPS FOR HEALTHY EATING
 Primitive: Eat “real’’ foods and avoid processed foods where possible.
 Preservatives: Always check the ingredients on the packet.
 Packaged: Even if it’s packaged, choose a healthy option.
 Pre-prepared: Always ask what’s in takeaway food.

Fresh is best for our kids

EATING fresh food and keeping active were among the main reasons Michael Harvey wanted to raise his daughter Chloe on the northern beaches.

The father-of-one said spending time outdoors, with plenty of exercise, was a way of life on the peninsula.

“We both lead pretty active lifestyles, her mum and myself,” he said.

“We try to eat reasonably well and play as much sport as we can.

“We have lived in a few places and we have relatives around Sydney and they talk about childhood obesity and we don’t really see that on the northern beaches because the lifestyle is so active.’’

Mr Harvey said he and his partner tried to avoid giving Chloe processed and prepackaged foods and encouraged her to play outside as often as possible.

The one-year-old has even been practising her surfing moves for when she’s old enough to paddle out.

“We don’t really give her too much of that sort of stuff,” he said of sugary, processed foods.

“If she has chocolate we notice the sugar rush pretty quickly. And she’s pretty active – we try to get her outside a couple of times a day because she sleeps better and she’s happier.”

To learn what to do if your child has an allergy come to Simple Instruction’s Apply First Aid or Perform CPR course on the 27th of August 2011 at the Brookvale Hotel.

Full article: http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/why-our-children-have-adhd-allergies-and-anxiety/

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