Archive for the ‘Compression’ category

CPR Training and Certification

May 6th, 2018

Simple Instruction is a Northern Beaches Training and certification provider for First Aid and CPR. If you are someone who too realizes the importance and benefits of knowing CPR or taking CPR certification, then you too can work your way towards making the Northern Beaches community a safer place.

CPR which stands for Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an emergency process which is performed in order to attempt to preserve brain function until any further medical help can be used or utilized.  A lot of people take special CPR training just to equip themselves with the knowledge so that they can deal with such emergency situations at home or in public. CPR and first aid training is also very important for nursing students or those who are looking for jobs in the field of nursing or medical care. But besides being a part of formal education, taking training in CPR is very beneficial in other ways as well.

The following are some points which will help you realize the benefits and advantages of knowing CPR:

  • The biggest or greatest benefit of knowing CPR is that it gives you the unique and useful gift of being able to save lives. CPR certification gives you the ability to save the lives of those who have just suffered from a heart attack or a sudden cardiac arrest.  It is a fact that cardiac arrests are the leading causes of death in adults and each year, more than 325000 cases of the same are being reported.

  • Those who know CPR can increase the survival rate of victims by more than 40% because each minute that treatment is delayed, the survival chances of the victim gets reduced by 10%.  This means that those who know CPR can cause a great difference between life and death of a person.

  • CPR certification or classes taken to gain a certification provide quality training and not just theoretical knowledge and this training can go a long way for the person and for others who benefit from it.  CPR certification makes people more responsible as they start feeling like they have the power of helping out people in the most difficult times of their life.

  • Those who gain CPR training tend to feel empowered and gain a certain better level of confidence which can be applied in many other fields of life such as at home or at work as well.

  • CPR training adds another feather to the cap of most people who take it and improves their overall knowledge base and experience. This can be impressive for employers especially in the case when a candidate belongs to the field of medical science or nursing. Infact, even other industries and companies can benefit from their employees who know CPR or have a formal CPR certification.

  • CPR certification not only brings knowledge but also a lot of respect. Your friends, family and colleagues start seeing you with an increased level of respect which can make you feel very special and responsible.

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education or care setting HLTAID004 training courses and certification are available at the Dee Why RSL on Sydney’s Northern Beaches. Book online today, Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909.

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

Provide CPR instructions on a Rash Vest. Saving lives on the Northern Beaches!

November 28th, 2017
Nothing beats a first aid or CPR course but this goes a long way to helping save kids. Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Get accredited with a HLTAID001 Provide CPR certificate, HLTAID002, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID004 training course.

The Rescue Rashie, printed with CPR instructions, aims to educate parents on resuscitation

MORE than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing, so action is being taken.

Emma Blake
News Corp Australia NetworkNOVEMBER 25, 20179:17PM

 

Westpac Rescue Rashie

THERE are no more excuses.

More than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing so Westpac is taking action.

Drowning deaths peaked at 49 nationally last year, so the time is right for the Rescue Rashie, a children’s rash vest printed with step-by-step instructions for how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Almost 56 per cent of parents with kids aged between two and eight said they wouldn’t know how to do CPR in the event of an emergency, a survey has found, despite children under four accounting for 42 per cent of non-fatal drownings.

Developed with the help of paediatric first aid training and awareness organisation CPR Kids, the bright red rash vests provide thorough instructions for how to save a child’s life.

They are also a constant reminder to parents about water safety, said CPR kids founder Sarah Hunstead.

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy Piper

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy PiperSource:News Corp Australia

“Adults are nervous about what to do (in the event of a child losing consciousness) but the Rescue Rashie puts the instructions right on their child’s chest,” Ms Hunstead said.

“Not only will it give parents more confidence to go straight into CPR but when they are ding the washing or folding it up and putting it away it’s reminding them about the steps for CPR.”

Two thirds of parents did not know the correct compression to breath ratio (30 to 2) for CPR, the survey of 1000 parents also found.

Hunstead said it is important to call an ambulance but, especially in a drowning accident, you cannot wait for help.

“While you wait for the ambulance oxygen is not circulating so you need to give breaths and you’ve got to push hard and fast on their chest as soon as possible,” she said.

Ironman and Olympic swimmer Ky Hurst said water safety is number one when it comes to his kids.

“As much as I love the water and have spent my life around it I know that accidents can happen,” he said.

“The instructions on the front (of the rashie) and the bright red colour serve as a constant reminder of how to keep your children safe.”

Hurst competed in the Men's 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News Corp

Hurst competed in the Men’s 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News CorpSource:News Limited

Drowning deaths in children under five jumped by 32 per cent nationally in 2016/17.

Almost 300 people drowned in the 12 months to June 30 — almost 20 per cent of those in December, according to the Royal Lifesaving Society.

While many of our beaches are patrolled with qualified Lifesavers, almost as many people drown in swimming pools (44) as at the beach (50) so it is up to parents to know what to do in the event of an accident.

Westpac, which has sponsored the Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service for 44 years, wanted to take the next step in their commitment to water safety and educate parents about water safety, said Jessica Power, Westpac State General Manager NSW.

The UPF 50+ vests are being sold for $35 with proceeds going to Take Heart Australia to fund CPR training.

Pure Profile conducted the nationwide survey of 1,000 Australian parents who have children between the ages of two and eight years old.

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Every Parent should know CPR and First Aid

August 4th, 2017

A mother has revealed how the first aid classes she took helped to save her son’s life when he stopped breathing.
Rachel Taylor had just called an ambulance when 10-month-old Finnley turned blue after going into septic shock.

Fortunately the 30-year-old was able to keep a calm head and performed the life-saving procedure until paramedics arrived.
Her action saved her son’s life and Rachael and Tom Batham are now urging others to learn CPR in case they ever find themselves in a similar situation.
‘It was petrifying but I just took my mind back to that day we did first aid training and just focused on what I needed to do,’ said Rachael, who is from Heaton, Newcastle.
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR

‘I didn’t start crying because there was no time to do that.’
Finnley first fell ill a month ago with a cold, cough and temperature and doctors prescribed him antibiotics for a possible infection.

Helicopter police officer spied on people sunbathing naked and having sex
On Monday I switched on the baby monitor and left him sleeping. Half an hour later, I heard a small noise,
so went up.
‘Finn was sat but as I went over to pick him up, his face just changed, it kind of contorted. Then he keeled over and started convulsing.
‘He’d had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with.’
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR
Finnley will make a full recovery (Picture: NCJ Media)
Rachael called 999 and was told an ambulance was on its way to her home.
But just as she was about to hang up Finnley stopped fitting, stiffened, turned blue and stopped breathing.

‘Panther-like creature’ stalks group for more than a mile through woodland
Rachael added: ‘That’s when the panic started to set in. I told the operator he’d stopped breathing and asked if I should do CPR.’
An ambulance crew arrived minutes later after FInnley was taken to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where he spent a week in intensive care.
Fortunately, he will make a full recovery but Rachael is now urging all parents to take paediatric first aid.
MORE: UK

Man stabbed in buttocks on platform of Leytonstone tube station

Soldier woke up to find false widow spider biting his leg

Hero computer expert who stopped cyber attack that hit the NHS is arrested
She said: ‘I don’t want to scare people but I want to raise awareness of how important it is. Without it, we could have lost him.
‘It was reading a story similar to ours on Facebook, that prompted me to book our course. I hope this might do the same for someone else.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/08/02/mother-reveals-why-every-parent-should-know-cpr-6823531/#ixzz4oklsMOjt

Northern Beaches Surf Lifesaver trained in first aid and CPR

July 13th, 2017

Avalon Beach SLSC should be praised for their efforts in providing first aid and CPR to a Northern Beaches man.

You can be called on at any time and this person should be praised for their efforts.

Original article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/lifesaver-praised-after-treating-man-70-who-fell-hard-on-rocks/news-story/477cd09f23298cf5d45b797c0c9376e5

Lifesaver praised after treating man, 70, who fell hard on rocks

A  MAN in his 70s who fell on rocks near the rock pool at Palm Beach yesterday morning was lucky a highly-trained lifesaver was nearby.

After being treated at the scene, the injured man was flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition with abrasions and a head injury.

The man was walking along the path near the rock pool when he fell on to the rocks below, causing a head injury that began bleeding profusely.

Avalon Beach SLSC patrol captain Nick Sampson, 23, was working on a nearby construction site when members of the public alerted him to the man’s injury.

“He had a deep cut to the head and there was a lot of blood,” Mr Sampson said.

“Apparently he felt faint and stumbled across the path and fell off the edge on to the rocks.”

Mr Sampson and others from the construction site grabbed a First-Aid kit and, along with bystanders, did what they could to stem the flow of blood from the man’s head wound until paramedics arrived.

Surf Life Saving NSW spokeswoman Donna Wishart said that after the paramedics arrived, Mr Sampson helped them administer oxygen, apply a neck brace and a defibrillator before the man was placed in an ambulance.

The man was driven to a waiting helicopter at North Palm Beach and flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition.

“The drama at Palm Beach shows just how valuable it is to have surf lifesavers trained in first aid and CPR out in the community and ready to use their skills and experience to help others,” Ms Wishart said.

Please make sure you are getting trained at the Dee Why RSL

Northern Beaches Defibrillator Access

July 6th, 2017

Northern Beaches defibrillator roll out – well done Duncan Kerr! With this great initiative we need to make sure the Northern Beaches community is trained in CPR and defibrillator use. Please book into a HLTAID001 Provide CPR training course at the Dee Why RSL

Original Article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/public-access-defibrillators-to-be-installed-in-hightraffic-areas-on-the-northern-beaches/news-story/d6a0fdc81ee672a5f7e55349dbba2c84

Public access defibrillators to be installed in high-traffic areas on the northern beaches
Robbie Patterson, Manly Daily
July 5, 2017 12:00am

PUBLICLY accessible defibrillators would be rolled out across high-priority areas of the northern beaches as part of a campaign to improve survival chances of heart attack victims.

Frenchs Forest resident Duncan Kerr, a paramedic of 10 years, has urged Northern Beaches Council to explore the possibility of putting 24-hour public-access defibrillators in high-traffic areas.

He highlighted areas such as The Corso at Manly, Warringah Mall and high-use sporting fields as key spots.

Mr Kerr said defibrillators were often hard to access as they are usually locked away inside sport clubs.

A public access defibrillator could be installed in Manly Corso. Picture: David Swift.
“These are public-access defibrillators, which means anyone can use, ” he said.

The former Warringah councillor and member of the Cardiac Arrest Survival Foundation, pointed to the peninsula’s only device of that calibre, which has been installed at Cromer Park.

“It is a big deal, especially at night or if you are just out walking the dog and no one else is around and something happens,” he said.

“They are always accessible and always monitored, which means when you pull the defibrillator out a triple-0 call is made.”

At last week’s Northern Beaches Council meeting, infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor agreed to look into the proposal.

Northern Beaches Council infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor. Picture: Troy Snook.
“If you save one life, it is well and truly worth supporting such a proposal,” he said. “My recommendation would be that council support sporting clubs in terms of the rollout of portable defibrillators but also look at high-priority sites across the local government area (for the public-access models).”

He said the council would “see if external funding from the Office of Sport and Recreation was available”, but would also look at the council’s budget.

Mr Kerr, who plans to run for the Northern Beaches Council, said he would be pushing this as a major policy issue ahead of the September 9 election.

Sports First Aid Courses available on the Northern Beaches

June 27th, 2017

First Aid Course Northern Beaches, Sydney. All sports teams need to have a first aid and CPR qualified person, it just makes sense. Book in now to get trained at the Dee Why RSL or we will come to you.

Steve Lillebuen
18 Jun 2017, 8:57 p.m.
A junior footballer in Melbourne is recovering in hospital after he was hit in the face with the ball during a suburban game.

Pines Under 19s player Kadel Key collapsed and suffered breathing problems when he was hit during the game against Mt Eliza on Saturday morning.

A doctor performed CPR on the teenager before paramedics arrived and continued treatment at the Eric Bell Reserve in Frankston North, an Ambulance Victoria spokesman said.

He was taken by ambulance to The Alfred hospital in a serious condition, but his condition improved and he remained listed in a stable condition on Sunday evening.

The injury occurred when Key was hit in the face with the ball while trying to block a Mt Eliza player from kicking a goal, said Pines Club president Jeff Svigos.

“It was a freak accident,” he said.

“You see players get hit with the ball all the time, but when he didn’t get up this time it was a bit scary.”

The game was called off when the serious injury occurred near the start of the second quarter.

The club has been in touch with Key and his family.

Officials will talk about what happened with the rest of his team on Monday.

The Mt Eliza Football Club said it was thinking about the player and his family.

“Under 19s game called off just after 1/4 time after Pines player Kadel Key was seriously injured,” the club wrote on its Facebook page.

“Thoughts go out to him and his family!”

The story Junior footy player collapses, game called off first appeared on The Age.

Provide First Aid and Provide CPR course – relaxed, simple, fun and relevant.

March 26th, 2017

Simple Instruction likes this article about first aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 courses on the Northern Beaches. We hope you enjoy this article as well. We are trying to get the emphasis the importance of first aid training for their staff but this article on explaining first aid to students/kids is great. Simple Instruction first aid courses are designed for adults but we can come to you and complete a basic children’s first aid course or HLTAID004 courses so that they are aware especially of when to call 000. Some great ideas before you attend a first aid or CPR course here though.

“Mom, give me some ice.” Ranvir, 6, and Viraj, 4, hardly ever seem to get along. One can spot them getting on their mother’s nerves on several occasions. “Such is the case with siblings, especially boys, I guess,” says their mom, Smriti.

Last week however, Ranvir surprised his mother when he came running into the kitchen looking for ice. His brother had fallen off the bed and had got a bump on his head.

“Not only did Ranvir cajole Viraj, he even applied ice and an antiseptic cream on the wound,” says Smriti, proudly.

Smriti says that she feels a certain sense of relief knowing that her child is well equipped to be a caregiver in case there’s a need. “These are required skills you know and should not be looked upon as burdening the child.”

It’s comforting to know that children are competent, especially when it comes to first aid. “Nobody can misguide them,” she says. Plus, these are survival strategies that human beings should know.

Knowing first aid can be fascinating for children if we use the right methods. All we need to do is combine learning with our day-to-day slips and falls; our job is done.

Want to know how? Read the following 10 tips:

1) Wounds as stories

“I treat wounds while giving tips.”

Pranali, mother of a four-year-old, explains every step of the first aid that she gives to her child. Recently, he fell down the stairs and bruised his knee.

“I’m cleaning the wound with antiseptic first. This avoids infection,” she said as she started first aid. Then, she went on to explain that after cleaning, she is applying an antiseptic cream.

“I was crossing my fingers because he licks everything,” she chuckles and explains how her son took the tube of cream in his hands and looked at it as she applied.

“Shaurya stops crying and gets distracted when I involve him in doing his own first aid. I think he learns and remembers my tips,” says Pranali.

If you’re comfortable and calm while giving first aid to your child, you can help him/her remain calm during medical emergencies too. Also, you’re teaching first aid.

Sounds cool. Doesn’t it?

2) Replicate

“He’s a lot into superheroes. They thrill him,” says Ashish. His seven-year-old enjoys action-packed films and does not get anxious or scared when he witnesses accidents. That gave Ashish an idea to teach his son about first aid by replicating a few things at home.

“I used socks and cotton balls to display swellings,” when his son had wanted to see what a swelling around a wound looked like. Ashish also showed him the way to tie bandages.

“I put some tomato sauce on my arm, told my son that a wound bleeds like that, and taught him how to bandage it. The sauce made it fun!”

Ashish believes that there’s no harm being realistic with your children. They need to know how the human body reacts during adverse situations so that, god forbid, if they are in similar situations, they know what to do.

Makes sense!

Doctor doctor!3) Play doctor

Well, this is a tried and tested, age-old method that still works. Playing doctor with young kids teaches them a lot about medical emergencies while maintaining a dose of fun.

“I don’t want him to get nightmares about cuts and wounds,” says Anamika. Her son is barely three and they’ve recently bought him a doctor’s kit. Since he wants to learn how to use it, she uses playtime to teach him about first aid.

“I know he is still too young, but I thought why not start now,” she explains.

Children learn fast when they find fun and relaxation in learning which is why Anamika feels that planning out serious first-aid sessions may not work with her son. During his natural urge for playing doctor, she is teaching her son about injuries, falls, and accidents.

“He listens to it like a story. Later, he’ll know better and by then, we’ll have bypassed the fear,” she exclaims.

First aid kit!4) Make a kit

Mumbai-based preschool teacher Jhanvi tells me that making a first-aid kit together is a good way to teach children the uses of each thing that go into the kit.

It also helps them understand that the first-aid kit is to be used in case of an emergency, it isn’t a toy.

“Yes, many times my kids play with the kit and spoil the contents, especially creams. It’s risky but I need to keep the kit easy-to-reach too,” says Dipika, mother to two boys.

Making a kit together will work as a DIY activity as well as a session on the importance of first aid. Try it!

5) The priority list

“My daughter does not have patience to sit and listen. Even if it’s her favourite activity, I cannot make her sit for more than 10 minutes at a stretch.”

Ridhima’s daughter is like any other kid—she lacks patience. Making a priority list of problems where first aid might be required and teaching children about those aspects first, helps curb this problem.

So, what can be included in this list?

Stopping a wound from bleeding
Holding nostrils to stop a nosebleed
Running a burnt body part under water
Putting ice over swellings
“We made a decorated chart with kids where we drew different body parts and basic first aid for them. It was fun,” says Shradha from Notre Dame Academy, Patna.

Why don’t you try making a quick chart or list too?

6) ‘Might’ happen and not ‘will’ happen

“Don’t scare them by saying that these things will happen. That’s key to teaching first aid,” says Dr Thakrey from Mumbai-based Sai Swasthya Clinic.

“Make them feel like superheroes who have the power during any medical emergency,” he says. He explains that describing to children the gory details, plus how important it’s to manage oneself during a medical problem will scare them and first aid should work as a fun tool.

“Kids are smart enough to apply knowledge when needed, we need not push it,” he concludes.

7) All that breaks

“I introduced him to first aid for fractures by using a doll. By slowly bending the doll’s limbs, I spoke about cracked bones and he listened to me, mesmerised,” says Sheena.

Sheena is a dentist who is currently a stay-at-home mom. She enjoys passing on her medical knowledge to her six-year-old.

Sheena says that talking to kids about bones and blood supply grabs their interest. “These things are real and there’s a lot of fun in reality,” she says. She has explained to her son that when bones get hurt, blood oozes out from them, which is why they hurt so much.

In these times, one must be patient with the person who is suffering the pain. Secondly, if he comes across someone who has fallen or is complaining of a hurting bone, he should immediately call another adult to help. Calling for help is also first aid.

First aid for fractures and sprains also means making the person who has fallen sit or lie down in a comfortable position. Not touching the hurting bone is the last, but most important rule.

“Helping out without a first-aid kit also comes under first aid, doesn’t it?” asks Sheena and I agree. Don’t you?

8) Raise an alarm!

“They should know that calling an adult to help is sometimes the best help they can provide,” says Dr Thakrey.

Shalini, a marketing executive with a cosmetics firm and mother of two, says that children should be taught to raise an alarm. It’s not their job to assess a situation. By raising alarms during medical emergencies, they will help themselves out of the situation and help the person in need too.

So, teach them to raise an alarm!

9) Mind over matter!

“We dropped him and went grocery shopping next door. Our cell phones were out of reach in that basement shop. He managed alone!”

Swayam had hurt himself at the football field and was feeling faint after that. His coach did some first aid and thereafter, tried calling Swayam’s parents. He was not able to get across to them, but felt helpless since the rest of the team of six-year-olds could not have been left unattended.

While Swayam sat in a corner and waited for his parents, he decided to breathe and stay calm. He pulled out his napkin and pressed his wounds till he felt better.

“We arrived and panicked when we saw the coach panicking around him. But our son stayed calm,” say Swayam’s parents.

They add that we might not always have resources for first aid and even if we have them, they may not work if there is no presence of mind. So along with first aid, teach your kids to employ their minds too!

10) A kid is but a kid!

“Every time I talk about first aid, I talk about personal safety first,” says Swati.

She believes that the safety of her two sons is more important than them helping out. “You can’t jump into a pool to save someone even if you know how to swim,” she tells her kids.

Dr Thakrey says, “Kids are taught first aid to help. That does not mean that they fix other’s problems on their own. They also need to be taught whether a situation demands first aid or not.”

“Getting close to open wires, people who have burnt themselves, or someone injured on the road is not the business of kids,” he adds

“I don’t talk to my sons about all the scary things that might happen,” says Swati.

Don’t you think she’s right? Children need not worry about consequences as they learn first aid. All they need to focus on is that knowledge is fun and that they can help themselves if certain situations arise.

As they say, knowledge is power!

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

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