Archive for the ‘DRSABCD’ category

Asthma Council Australia – Blue Butterfly Program

July 10th, 2012

At the National Asthma Council Australia, we know that if you are one of the 7 million Australians with allergy or the 2 million with asthma, you want to know how you could improve the health and wellbeing of you and your family. That’s why we developed the Sensitive Choice® program.

Our Sensitive Choice® blue butterfly symbol is a way of recognising products and services from companies that support asthma and allergy care. Products that carry the blue butterfly may be better choices for people with asthma and allergies.

The Sensitive Choice® program has over 200 products and services carrying the blue butterfly. Through a partnership between the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation of New Zealand and the National Asthma Council Australia, New Zealanders are also able to benefit from this program.

The program is a type of sponsorship program, although approved products and services must satisfy our independent Product Advisory Panel they do no harm and may offer relative benefits to people with asthma or allergies.

If you see the blue butterfly when shopping, stop for a moment and think about your family’s asthma and allergy care.

  • Do you know your triggers?
  • Are you taking steps to reduce your exposure to your triggers?
  • Have you had an asthma and allergy review with your doctor recently?
  • Do you follow your asthma or allergy action plan?

To learn more about the National Asthma Council Australia, please visit our website: www.nationalasthma.org.au

To learn more about the program and to discuss whether your product may be suitable, please contact:

Adam Trumble Email: adam.trumble@nationalasthma.org.au

Narrabeen Sports High School – Apply First Aid

March 15th, 2012

Apply First Aid Certification


On Friday March 2, 15 of our students and 14 students from Pittwater High School participated in a Apply First Aid Assessment day run by Mr Wood (PE). Prior to their practical and theoretical assessments on the day, all students hadto complete a rigorous online workbook detailing many of the issues that may be faced by a qualified first aider.
These 29 students undertook the certification to contribute towards the community service component of their Bronze Award. I would like to extend a huge thank you to Mr Wood for coordinating the day and enabling these students to achieve this three-year qualification.

 

CPR and First Aid in Schools

January 30th, 2012

Brittney Kleyn

THE shores of Summer Bay are never far from a little beachside drama – but when
it comes to water safety, the stars of Home and Away aren’t taking any chances.

The cast of the popular Australian show have thrown their support behind The
Daily Telegraph’s campaign to bring compulsory certified CPR training into high
schools.

Sign
our petition for certified CPR training in NSW
schools

When Axle Whitehead, who plays Liam Murphy on the show, found himself having
to rescue a tourist at Bondi
Beach
, he was thankful for the basic training he had received as a kid.

“I’ve witnessed it first hand and learning the old CPR, I think it’s
absolutely imperative for that one time when you need it,” he said.

Recommended Coverage

 

CERTIFIED CPR training could be provided to school
students for less than $40m a year – and lifesaving groups said there were
options to cut the cost.
THE face of road trauma prevention – now Associate
Professor Brian Owler backs The Daily Telegraph’s push for CPR in the national
school curriculum.
FOOTY players put their bodies on the line week in,
week out, but their injuries on the paddock can rarely be described as
life-threatening.
NO one knows how important CPR is more than doctors
- even the juniors, and a new batch of them are learning it this week at St
George Hospital.
LIFESAVING CPR must be taught in the nation’s
schools. Join our campaign backed by Royal Life Saving Australia and St John
Ambulance.
THE Parents and Citizens Association has supported
The Daily Telegraph’s popular campaign for certified CPR training for all
students.
NATIONAL curriculum writers will consider including
mandatory CPR lessons in all schools in the wake of a campaign by The Daily
Telegraph.

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s like learning how to draw or spell and as Australians we spend so much
time in the water. It is so important.”

His on-screen girlfriend Bianca Scott, played by Lisa Gormley, emphasised the
necessity of knowing the basics before heading out into the water.

“I just think it’s vital. It’s a good confidence thing for yourself as well -
knowing if something happens you have some knowledge of how to deal with it,”
she said.

Home and Away’s Samara Weaving said it was important for CPR training to
start young.

“Even if kids are just aware and learning the basics, things happen and they
need to know these vital skills.” she said.

With lifeguards always on the set, Weaving said it put the cast at ease
knowing someone experienced had their back.

“CPR skills aren’t too hard to teach. Not when you compare it to how useful
they are should that situation ever come up,” she said.

Now in its 24th season, the stars of the Channel 7 series said there was lots
of drama in store for the residents of Summer Bay.

“We’ve pulled the trigger. It’s a really exciting first half of the year for
all our characters. A lot of juicy stuff to come,” Whitehead said.

“Our characters are in a good place, for now that is. I guess it’s a case of
stayed tuned.”

Gormley said it was a privilege to be part of such a successful, long-running
program.

“It’s absolutely amazing. They are such a well-oiled machine and they’ve been
going so well for so long,” she said.

Simple Instruction is supporting this iniative to get CPR and First Aid into schools. Simple Instruction has been conducting courses for schools on the Northern Beaches and around Sydney for the past 2 years. Schools such as Narrabeen Sports High School, Barrenjoey High School, Ryde Secondary College, Hunters Hill High School, Balgowlah Boys High School and Mascot High School have taken this opportunity to increase the safety in the school with training to over 300 students and teachers in First Aid and CPR.

Simple instruction also has public Apply First Aid and Perform CPR courses most Saturdays at The Brookvale Hotel for anyone who would like to come along in 2012.

First Aid and CPR Saves Lives

November 17th, 2011

Bystanders often feel helpless when they see somebody collapse or get injured, but knowing just a little about the basics could transform the chances of survival, writes Lissa Christopher

The young marathon runner was still lying face down and showed no signs of life when Penelope Little arrived.

“As soon as I rolled him over it was very obvious … he wasn’t breathing and … I could tell pretty quickly he needed CPR [cardio pulmonary resuscitation],” the NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said. There were lots of people around but no one had tried to turn him over, let alone start CPR. They’d called for help and left it at that.

“At a bare minimum they should have rolled him onto his side, into the recovery position,” she says. “You should never leave someone lying face down. But this man required CPR and the fact that nobody gave it to him – it was alarming. It was like, ‘come on, people!’ This man is obviously unwell.”

It’s common for bystanders to do nothing when someone has collapsed and wait for “someone in a uniform” to turn up. Studies from the US have shown that the primary reason bystanders don’t attempt CPR is fear of not doing it correctly but, as Harvard Medical School states in its public health guides, “Poor CPR is better than no CPR” (see box).

”People don’t realise that the role of a bystander is actually very important,” Little says. “Particularly in case of CPR. It needs to be done very soon after the person has gone into cardiac arrest. It you have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, your chance of survival is about 3 per cent and the only way you are going to survive is if somebody quickly recognises that you are in cardiac arrest, quickly does CPR and quickly calls an ambulance.”

Presuming CPR requires an expert is probably the most serious first-aid misconception, but as NSW Ambulance and St John Ambulance will attest, there are plenty of others.

Take fainting, for example. It’s common for well-meaning people to try to get someone who has fainted to sit up. In fact, they should be left lying down.

St John Ambulance deals with a lot of fainting during the Royal Easter Show, Little says, particularly among elderly visitors. It happens everywhere from the showbag pavilion to the scones ”and it’s amazing how many times you get there and someone is trying to prop this woman up on a chair when all she wants to do is faint and lie back on the ground”.

“I often say to people, if a person wants to faint, let them do it. In essence, it’s the body trying to fix itself, usually because there’s a problem with their blood pressure.”

Other scenarios where paramedics and St John Ambulance volunteers commonly encounter misapprehensions include bleeding noses, burns, poisoning, penetrating injuries, choking, diabetic coma and seizures.

People often don’t realise that diabetics can lapse into a coma due to high blood sugar as well as low blood sugar, Caroline Woods, an intensive care paramedic with the Ambulance Service of NSW, says. Feeding sugar to someone who is having a high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) attack is only going to make things worse.

“We often find someone lying on the floor with all these lollies hanging out of their mouth,” she says. “Someone has tried their best to help but they’ve got it wrong.”

Little recalls attending to a seven-year-old girl having a seizure and her father had his hand in her mouth, holding onto her tongue in the mistaken belief he was stopping her from swallowing it. “I said to him, ‘take your hand out of her mouth and let her have her seizure’,” she says.

“Never try to hold down someone who is having a seizure,” Woods says. Clear them a space and put something soft under their head if possible. Don’t put anything in their mouth.

It’s not actually possible for someone to swallow their own tongue. People often bite their tongue during a seizure, but they’re highly unlikely to bite through it so don’t panic, she says.

Despite the poor odds, the marathon runner Little found lying face down did survive. Little got to him quite quickly and performed CPR for several minutes, another St John person arrived in minutes with a defibrillator and an ambulance arrived shortly after that. “He was 29 and he made a full recovery,” Little says. “He was a very lucky guy.”

“In my job, you often wish that a bystander had been more helpful. We are so lucky with NSW Ambulance that when you dial 000 they will give you advice over the phone but often people are hysterical or they don’t listen to that advice or they hang up.

“So many times I have thought, ‘please, God, I hope somebody is already doing CPR … because we are not going to be able to save this person unless somebody has started’.”

St John Ambulance runs regular first-aid courses and recommends a CPR refresher every 12 months.

Your closest Apply First Aid and Perform CPR course on The Northern Beaches is at The Brookvale Hotel. Come along and get trained by Simple Instruction and enjoy a fun day out.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/first-aid-and-the-myths-that-cost-lives-20110831-1jlty.html#ixzz1dvo8I1D2

First Aid in the Fitness Industry

August 24th, 2011

Gyms under spotlight after man’s death

Updated August 18, 2011 12:56:00

 Video: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-17/melbourne-gym-death-findings-released/2844062
Coroner calls for first aid training in gyms (7pm TV News VIC)
The coroner has recommended mandatory first-aid training for gym staff.

A Victorian coroner is calling for greater regulation of the
fitness industry after the death of a 29-year-old man at a Melbourne gym.

David Thomas went without CPR immediately after suffering a heart attack in
2007 because there was only one worker on duty and her first-aid training was
out of date.

The coroner found his death was not preventable, but on Wednesday recommended
the State Government introduce regulations for mandatory first-aid training for
gym staff.

Mr Thomas’s sister Jenny Cursio says her family has been fighting for four
years to improve industry regulations.

“We never wanted it to become anything more than a vehicle where we could
make a change,” she said.

The Thomas family’s lawyer, John Cain, says the Government must act
swiftly.

“The clear message from the coroner is that the industry regulation that has
existed to date has failed, it’s inadequate,” he said.

“What the coroner is saying is the Government needs to step in, fill that
void, and introduce some regulations.”

The gym’s owner, Fitness First, supports the move.

Topics: accidents—other, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, courts-and-trials, law-crime-and-justice, melbourne-3000, vic

First posted August 17, 2011 19:33:23

 

Comments (14)

Comments for this story are closed, but you can
still have your say.


  • ABC (Moderator):

    17 Aug 2011 8:29:45pm

    Do you think gyms need tougher regulations?

    Alert moderator


    • hairy nosed wombat:

      17 Aug 2011 9:02:49pm

      All gyms and public swimming pools should have Automated External
      Defibrillators (AEDs). There is very good evidence for this – they would save a
      few lives a year across Australia, and are only a couple of thousand
      dollars.

      Alert moderator


    • TigerLee:

      17 Aug 2011 11:54:59pm

      I’m a regular weight trainer and frequent the gym and believe that everyone
      does need to be sensible and be responsible for themselves. If you know yourself
      and your body well enough and you are honest with yourself then you should know
      your limits, etc. Having said that, there needs to be more guidance in the gym
      and DEFINITELY people with First Aid training on the gym floor – not just one
      person. Not sure that this environment should be too heavily regulated – don’t
      we have enough of that but something needs to happen. Gyms need to be more
      responsible and sensible when it comes to its patrons and their health &
      safety.

      Alert moderator


  • Lindsay Cooper:

    17 Aug 2011 8:39:48pm

    No! We have more than enough regulations now and many of them don’t work
    as intended. Regulations concerning drugs just keep the price up.

    Alert moderator


  • peter of mitcham:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:25pm

    Yes I do! Personally I wouldn’t go anywhere near them but my wife attended
    one of those “women only” gyms. How does that work? Isn’t it against the law to
    discriminate against someone in providing a service on the basis of their
    gender? Anyway this mob was downright dangerous in the pressure they put on
    people. Them and their stupid little school games trying to shame people into
    exercising harder. I think they should be tightly regulated. Take down the “No
    Pain No Gain” signs and put up one that says “A Fitter Person Is Not Necessarily
    A Better Person”

    Alert moderator


  • Founder:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:52pm

    Most of the time I go to the Gym there is no one on duty.
    Will they ban
    the 24 hour gyms?

    People do need to take some responsibility for their
    own lives.

    Alert moderator


    • Michael:

      17 Aug 2011 11:01:16pm

      I completely agree. Let people be responsible for their own decisions. I know
      that I want to be.

      Alert moderator


    • Foundette:

      17 Aug 2011 11:47:19pm

      “People do need to take some responsibility for their own lives.”

      How
      would they do that? By administering first aid to themselves after they’ve
      collapsed?

      Alert moderator


  • Lawrie:

    17 Aug 2011 9:09:56pm

    No! While I don’t use a gym, I run and work out with weights in my own home.
    What ever happened to personal responsibility? Take control of your life. If you
    slip over in a supermarket, you should have taken more care, instead of
    expecting to sue the supermarket for ‘their negligence’. If you have a fatal
    heart attack walking up steps, sad, but that is life.

    Alert moderator


  • Jeppa:

    17 Aug 2011 9:17:12pm

    Gyms do need to take occupational health and safety more seriously than they
    do. They are high risk areas, but there seldom seems to be anyone qualified to
    deal with injuries or illnesses available. At any other high risk workplace, not
    having a staff member with a current first aid certificate would be completely
    unacceptable.

    Whether the government is able to – or even should – change
    the way gym managers choose to run their facilities is another question. A
    better approach would be for consumers to ask serious questions about safety and
    the qualifications of *all* staff before signing up. There are plenty of gyms
    out there to choose from.

    Alert moderator


  • CVL:

    17 Aug 2011 9:28:34pm

    Absolutely – I’ve seen some appalling behaviour from on-duty gym
    “instructors”, from running away to laughing when people have seriously injured
    themselves on the equipment. And then there are those 2-3 hour windows that
    every gym I’ve been a member of has where there are no staff on
    duty.

    Clearly the only way forward is through the threat of government
    sanctions on an organisation and/or an individual.

    Alert moderator


  • rod:

    17 Aug 2011 9:29:30pm

    No

    I suppose first aid training is desirable for anyone, but there is
    no extra risk in a Gym over anything else you do.

    I just think we need
    less rules and more common sense.

    Alert moderator


  • FitnessEmployee:

    17 Aug 2011 9:52:19pm

    In SA, it is an industry standard that gym instructors, personal trainers and
    fitness instructors have up to date CPR and First Aid along with relevant
    qualifications. It is also common sense as fitness facilities have a duty of
    care over all people in their centre, so why wouldn’t a facility ensure staff
    know what they’re doing? Good centres hound their employees when certificates
    fall out of date; even better ones provide training regularly to ensure no one
    has an excuse. I have never worked in a centre that will employ someone without
    first aid and CPR training (and I’ve worked in LOTS of SA fitness facilities).

    I have worked at a centre where a client has died from a heart attack
    and staff were quick to respond and keep the client alive until paremedics
    arrived. Often, despite all the best cues and care and precautions from fitness
    centre staff, people just have heart attacks or other health issues. In the case
    I was exposed to, it was caused by something unpreventable, whether the client
    was at the gym, at home, or at a hospital.

    People do need to accept
    personal responsibility and recognise their boundaries when exercising AND staff
    have a responsibility to provide safe and effective information regarding a
    person’s exercise regieme and known health issues. This is why many choose to
    exercise under supervision of fitness facilities rather than on their
    own.

    If you feel you are not getting this from your fitness centre, ask
    them why, as its a legal requirement (and common sense). It might also be time
    to shop around for another gym!

    Regarding “shaming” participants into
    exercise: every instructor is different, same as doctors, nurses, physios,
    lawyers, etc. and if you don’t like their personality, try another instructor.
    Some do use pushier techniques (like what you imagine or see on TV), but more
    use motivational psychology and encouragement as these are proven to get better
    long-term results which ultimately serves the industry better and provides job
    security!

    Alert moderator


  • Teubes:

    17 Aug 2011 10:31:21pm

    The gym supports it ? if I owned the gym I would of already trained all staff
    in 1st aid and installed AEDs. A big gym like fitness first should already have
    this in place. You would think, wouldn’t you ?

    Alert moderator

Manly Daily – 09/08/11

August 10th, 2011

Why our children have ADHD, allergies and anxiety

8 Aug 11 @  06:00pm by Carleen Frost

PARENTS are being urged to get back to basics and lead a more “primitive” lifestyle to boost their child’s health and happiness.

Narrabeen Dr Robyn Cosford said returning to “real” food, avoiding artificial light and switching off wireless internet were the first steps she recommended to her patients, particularly those with behavioural problems.

Dr Cosford believes wireless internet and other household appliances could be changing the function of the brain.

“The first thing that we try to get our parents to do is getting their kids to eat all real foods – no more processed or packaged foods,” she said.

“We have this very strong tendency for the diet to be predominantly wheat and sugar-based, so it’s not uncommon that the children have an adverse reaction to those foods.

“A true food allergy is not that common. Food intolerance or food insensitivity is very common.”

Dr Cosford, the founder of the Northern Beaches Care Centre, will address the Mindd Foundation’s International Forum on Children in Randwick this weekend.

The forum will focus on the links between nutrition and lifestyle and conditions such as ADHD, allergies, anxiety and digestive problems.

She said her message would be about “restoring” lifestyles.

“The environment is increasingly toxic and more and more people are having a problem,” she said.

“We have to get back to going outside and connecting with the Earth and cutting out all this artificial light.

“If people could do these basics, straight away they will find a significant change in their child’s behaviours.”

DOCTOR’S TIPS FOR HEALTHY EATING
 Primitive: Eat “real’’ foods and avoid processed foods where possible.
 Preservatives: Always check the ingredients on the packet.
 Packaged: Even if it’s packaged, choose a healthy option.
 Pre-prepared: Always ask what’s in takeaway food.

Fresh is best for our kids

EATING fresh food and keeping active were among the main reasons Michael Harvey wanted to raise his daughter Chloe on the northern beaches.

The father-of-one said spending time outdoors, with plenty of exercise, was a way of life on the peninsula.

“We both lead pretty active lifestyles, her mum and myself,” he said.

“We try to eat reasonably well and play as much sport as we can.

“We have lived in a few places and we have relatives around Sydney and they talk about childhood obesity and we don’t really see that on the northern beaches because the lifestyle is so active.’’

Mr Harvey said he and his partner tried to avoid giving Chloe processed and prepackaged foods and encouraged her to play outside as often as possible.

The one-year-old has even been practising her surfing moves for when she’s old enough to paddle out.

“We don’t really give her too much of that sort of stuff,” he said of sugary, processed foods.

“If she has chocolate we notice the sugar rush pretty quickly. And she’s pretty active – we try to get her outside a couple of times a day because she sleeps better and she’s happier.”

To learn what to do if your child has an allergy come to Simple Instruction’s Apply First Aid or Perform CPR course on the 27th of August 2011 at the Brookvale Hotel.

Full article: http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/why-our-children-have-adhd-allergies-and-anxiety/

First Aid and CPR course saves a life.

June 28th, 2011

1 Day First Aid course – Febrile Convulsions

May 30th, 2011

Simple Instruction has found another great article from The Childrens Hospital at Westmead. At many of my First Aid courses many people have not heard of Febrile Convulsions, this has prompted me to put this article up.

If you would like to learn more about emergency First Aid. Enrol in one of Simple Instructions Apply First Aid or Perform CPR courses being held at the Brookvale Hotel on the 18th of June 2011.

Febrile convulsions

Disclaimer: This fact sheet is for education purposes only. Please consult with your doctor or other health professional to make sure this information is right for your child.

What is a febrile convulsion?

A febrile convulsion (also known as a febrile seizure) is a common medical condition. Approximately 3% of children aged 6 months to 6 years may have a convulsion when they have a fever or high temperature.

A convulsion is caused by a short burst of abnormal electrical activity in the brain. This is when the nerve cells send “mixed-up” signals to each other. These mixed-up signals may lead to a change in the child’s awareness or body movement. Sometimes people use other names for convulsions such as fits or seizures.

What causes a febrile convulsion?

The febrile convulsion or seizure happens when the normal brain activity is disturbed by a fever. It usually occurs without warning. During the seizure your child may:

  • become stiff or floppy
  • become unconscious or unaware of their surroundings
  • display jerking or twitching movements
  • have difficulty breathing.

What should I do if my child has a convulsion?

Remember, most seizures will stop within seconds or a couple of minutes without any medical treatment.

  • Stay calm.
  • Note the time the seizure starts and ends if possible.
  • Stay with your child.
  • Roll your child onto their side, also known as the recovery position.
  • Move away from potentially harmful objects eg furniture with sharp corners.
  • Place something soft under your child’s head to stop their head hitting the floor.
  • Unless you are giving your child emergency medication (midazolam), never put anything in the mouth of your child – it is impossible for your child to swallow their tongue.

Should I call an ambulance?

Call 000 for an ambulance if:

  • It is your child’s first seizure.
  • The seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes.
  • The seizure occurs in water and your child has trouble breathing.
  • Your child also has a head injury.
  • Your child’s breathing doesn’t return to normal shortly after the seizure or your child remains blue around the lips.
  • You are unsure that your child is safe and recovering normally after the seizure.

Why is my child sleepy after the seizure?

Your child will become tired after the seizure and your child will need time to rest and recover. If your child remains drowsy or difficult to wake after sleep, you should seek medical attention.

What can the doctors do for my child?

Even though the high temperature is usually related to a viral infection, your doctor will need to examine your child to try and determine the cause of the high temperature. Further investigations or blood tests may need to be done to rule out other causes for the fever and convulsion.

Can my child get another convulsion the next time they have a fever?

Yes. The chance of having another febrile convulsion in the following year is 30%, but this means that 70% (or 7 out of 10 children) will not have another seizure. The risk of a second seizure reduces every year and it becomes extremely rare after children turn 6 years old.

What does the future hold for my child?

The outlook for a child with simple febrile convulsions is excellent. There is no evidence of “brain damage” in these children. Your child is at only a very small risk of developing epilepsy in the future if they had a simple febrile convulsion.

What should I do when my child develops fever in the future?

To reduce the fever you can use medicines, such as paracetamol (Panadol, Dymadon or Tylenol) only as directed. Remember that these medications will make your child feel better from the fever but they do not treat the infection that caused the fever. These medicines do not prevent the seizure from occurring. You should take your child to see your local doctor if your child looks unwell, you are concerned about them or if the fever persists.

Is there any treatment available if my child has more frequent febrile convulsions at home?

There is a medication called Midazolam that is sometimes recommended for children who have frequent febrile convulsions or if your child has a history of febrile convulsions that last longer then 5 minutes. Most children do not require this medication. If you would like more information about this treatment you should talk with your doctor.

Are there any other medications available to prevent febrile convulsions?

Yes, however these medications have to be taken every day and they can have unwanted side effects. Because the outlook for children with febrile convulsions is so good, these regular medications are rarely necessary.

Remember

  • Regular Paracetamol will not prevent febrile convulsions.
  • If your child has a fit stay with them and lay them on their side.
  • Call an ambulance if the seizure last longer than 5 minutes.
  • You know your child best seek medical attention if you are concerned about your child.

 

Kids Health (CHW) Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick Kaleidoscope, Hunter Children's Health Network
The Children’s Hospital at Westmead
Tel: (02) 9845 0000
Fax: (02) 9845 3489
www.chw.edu.au
Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick
Tel: (02) 9382 1688
Fax: (02) 9382 1451
www.sch.edu.au
Kaleidoscope, Hunter Children’s Health Network
Tel: (02) 4921 3670
Fax: (02) 4921 3599
www.kaleidoscope.org.au

 

© The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick
& Kaleidoscope, Hunter Children’s Health Network – 2005-2011.

 

This document was reviewed on Thursday, 26 February 2009.

Training for an Anapen?? First Aid and CPR courses available.

May 9th, 2011

How do I use the Anapen®?

There are 4 main steps.

REMOVE Anapen and DO NOT touch needle. Massage injection site for 10 seconds.

The needle does not retract completely and may cause a needle stick injury. The used Anapen may be placed in a suitable plastic container.

What should I do after giving the Anapen®?

You should always call an ambulance even if the Anapen® relieves symptoms. Your action plan for anaphylaxis provides the phone number. When an Anapen® has been used the patient should remain under medical observation for at least 4-6 hours after the symptoms have resolved.

This is great information for the use of Anapen’s. Simple Instruction has been conducting Apply First Aid (Senior First Aid) courses showing how the use an Anapen if anaphylaxis occurs. If you would like to come to one of Simple Instruction’s courses on the Northern Beaches or would like to book a Private course, we would love to hear from you. I hope you have enjoyed this information from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead and if you would like any more great information see their website @ www.wch.edu.au .

Manly – First Aid / CPR course this weekend.

March 29th, 2011

Need to update your Apply (Senior) First Aid certificate or your Perform CPR resuscitation certificate? This weekend the 2nd of April is a great opportunity to get trained and maybe you can save a life or treat someone when an unexpected emergency occurs.

There have been a number of changes to the course in the last few months with the acronym DRABCD changing to DRSABCD and the way we use this acronym being revised in January 2011. See Australian Resuscitation Council website for changes. Simple Instruction’s First Aid and CPR training courses are constantly revising our guidelines to stay under the current VETAB regulations that alot of other companies are slow change. This is what sets Simple Instruction and Allens Training (RTO) apart from the competition with up to date, relevant material. So it begs the question; Are you trained to save someone in an emergency situation?

Simple Instruction conducts it’s training courses out of the Brookvale Hotel/Pub which is centrally located for all residents on the Northern Beaches. Manly residents have only a short drive down Pittwater Rd. Warringah residents find it is an easy as it is just near The Brookvale Oval and Pittwater Residents it is only a short drive down Barrenjoey/Pittwater Rd. All are welcome and encouraged to bring a friend, making it a day, getting trained together and having a tasty lunch downstairs at the Pub. Training all our residents will make our Northern Beaches a safer more pleasant place to live – you never know when you are going to have to save someone.

Brookvale Hotel -Apply (Senior) First Aid – 10am to 4pm.
- Perform CPR – 1pm to 4pm.

© 2014 Simple Instruction | Blog RSS | Find us on Facebook