Archive for the ‘DY RSL’ category

What’s On? Northern Beaches Council Events – School holidays

June 30th, 2017

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 training courses provided by Simple Instruction are on some of the things happening in the July School Holidays.

All public courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) and is centrally located to cater for all suburbs from Brookvale to Avalon, Manly to Belrose and Freshwater to Mona Vale. All courses are accredited through Allen’s Training.

Simple Instruction is a proud Northern Beaches, Sydney business and want to ensure we have a safe community. Please ensure you are safe these school holidays and get trained in First Aid or CPR. Private courses are available!

If you are looking for things to do it might be wise to have a ‘staycation’ and look at the Northern Beaches Council link listed below.

http://thingstodo.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/whats-on/event-calendar

Applying First Aid Training – St John’s First Aid Course

June 5th, 2017

CPR courses save lives. What a great effort by this pregnant women to save her husband. Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Get accredited training through Allen’s Training and Simple Instruction – we offer HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course that cover all industry requirements.

Pregnant woman saves partner’s life: ‘I would have done CPR until I collapsed’
BEN PIKE, The Sunday Telegraph
February 5, 2017 5:00am
Subscriber only
A MIRACULOUS, superhuman effort from a heavily pregnant woman has saved the life of the love of her life.

Karen Clark’s partner Colin Winn went into cardiac arrest inside their Coogee apartment on Australia Day.

Ms Clark, 36 weeks pregnant, called triple-0 at 3.35pm and was told that to begin CPR she needed to move her unconscious 87kg IT manager partner from the couch on to the floor.

“I’m thinking: ‘How the hell can I do that when I can’t even roll over in bed without grunting’,” the 37-year-old said.

Not only did she get him on to the floor but she then drew on her St John first aid training and performed CPR on him for an incredible 10 minutes ­before paramedics arrived.

The exertion required for effective CPR means medical professionals swap over every minute.

Doctors said performing CPR for 10 minutes is the equivalent of a fit person running 2km at a three-quarter pace. Ms Clark, who is expecting her first child, did it while eight months pregnant.

“But adrenaline and the man you love dying in front of you, and carrying his child, is the biggest motivator you can ever imagine,” she said.

“I would have done it until I collapsed.”

The second miracle was that the paramedics were carrying a battery-powered LUCAS2 machine, which performs CPR at 100 pumps a minute.

The machine is installed in six rapid response ambulances in the Sydney CBD and is part of a clinical trial ­between St Vincent’s Hospital, RPA Hospital and NSW Ambulance.

Since the trial started 18 months ago nine of 16 cardiac arrest patients treated at St Vincent’s have survived. The LUCAS2 machine worked on Mr Winn’s heart before the IT manager was rushed to St Vincent’s.

Mr Winn, already a dad to 10-year-old Chiara, was brought to tears when thinking about how close he was to leaving two kids fatherless. He is ­expected to make a strong recovery.

If they have a boy, the couple is considering the name Lucas — after the ­device that helped save Mr Winn.

Ms Clark brought Mr Winn back down to Earth, jokingly telling him: “Whenever I ask for a cup of tea and you complain, I will say: ‘Remember that time I saved your life?’ ”

● Ms Clark is raising money to have another LUCAS2 machine installed in NSW ambulances. Visit www.gofund me.com/Lucas-CPR-machine

Apply First Aid Northern Beaches (Senior First Aid)

June 1st, 2017

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR specialist Simple Instruction still knows many customers are referring to the Provide First Aid Training Course HLTAID003 as the Apply First Aid Course or the Senior First Aid Course. Its nice to know that Simple Instruction stays up to date with our teaching and our naming of our training courses.

Located at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches we have been providing training courses for local High School Narrabeen Sports High School and Barrenjoey High School through participant contributions.

With clients from Avalon, Davidson, Belrose, Newport, Manly, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill, Cromer and Seaforth all singing our praises it is no wonder we are the Number 1 training organisation on the Northern Beaches.

Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR courses have provided accredited courses for the region.

Dee Why First Aid Course

May 28th, 2017

Dee Why First Aid training courses are available with Simple Instruction. Based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, Simple Instruction offers First Aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 training courses. Simple Instruction has been offering First and CPR training course to the Northern Beaches community for the past 8 years and has a strong reputation throughout the Sydney region.

By providing the Childcare First Aid Course HLTAID004 over the last 4 years we have catered for the Child care industry. With Child Care First Aid training courses now reduced to $150 we have seen more students trained over the last few weeks at the DYRSL (Dee Why RS:).

Accredited Childcare First Aid Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney.

April 9th, 2017

CHILDCARE workers with fraudulent first aid certificates are risking kids’ lives, the childcare watchdog has warned the federal government.

The Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) has blown the whistle on dodgy training colleges for handing out qualifications to incompetent students.

It says state childcare regulators have expressed fears that some childcare workers with first aid certificates have no idea of what to do in a medical emergency.

All staff in family daycare, and at least one carer in each long daycare centre, must be trained in first aid, anaphylaxis and asthma management.

“A situation where a student has completed one qualification and is incorrectly deemed competent, could present a serious and significant risk to children being educated and cared for,’’ ACECQA warns in a submission to the Department of Education and Training.

“A … failure of graduates to properly administer first aid to children in their care in times of emergency carries a high risk to children and could have life-threatening consequences.’’

ACECQA also criticises the poor English skills of some childcare workers and calls for mandatory literacy tests before students graduate.

It says childcare centres have complained about qualified staff who “do not possess the basic literacy skills expected of them’’.

The Australian Childcare Alliance (ACA) of private daycare centres also demanded the federal Education Department to take “bold action’’ against training colleges that fail to properly train staff.

“The very nature of the industry evolves around very young and, as such, vulnerable children who are reliant on the competency and skills of their educators,’’ it said.

NSW Early Childhood Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said the state government would “use the full extent of the law’’ to deal with dodgy childcare qualifications.

“Services and individuals that have submitted fraudulent documentation will be investigated and can be prosecuted,’’ she said.

Simple Instruction offers HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid Training and our regular HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR training courses. All courses are accredited and meet the ACECQA standards. Book a course on the Northern Beaches at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/kids-lives-at-risk-in-childcare-first-aid-fail/news-story/6d82e16b2691e177db008e7de5b1a061

First Aid Course Northern Beaches – March / April and May dates available

March 24th, 2017

First Aid and CPR training courses are now available for March, April and May. Simple Instruction is offering HLTAID003, HLTAID001, HLTAID004 training courses at our centrally located training centre within the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

Suggested training providers include St John Ambulance

All newly qualified Level 2 and 3 entrants to the early years workforce must have a paediatric first-aid (PFA) certificate within three months of starting work in order to be included in ratios.
The requirement, originally intended to start in September 2016, has been added to the revised Early Years Foundation Stage framework, effective from 3 April.

The EYFS now says all entrants who completed a Level 2 or 3 qualification on or after 30 June 2016 must have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate.

Newly qualified entrants include staff who had been apprentices or long-term students and have gained a Level 2 or 3.

Those who started work between 20 June 2016 and 2 April 2017 must hold either of the certificates by 2 July 2017 to be included in ratios.

Providers can make an exemption if staff are unable to gain a certificate due to disability.

Annex A of the framework provides further detail of what training has to be completed in order to obtain either a full or emergency PFA certificate (see box, right).

It states that settings are responsible for identifying and selecting a ‘competent’ training provider to deliver their PFA training. A number of training providers are suggested, including St John Ambulance, the Red Cross and St Andrew’s First Aid.

Training for the full PFA should last a minimum of 12 hours, and a minimum of six hours for the emergency PFA.

The certificates should be displayed in settings or made available to parents and renewed every three years.

OTHER CHANGES

The revised framework also incorporates the new Level 3 qualification requirements, replacing the GCSE-only rule.

It states, ‘To count in the ratios at Level 3, staff holding an Early Years Educator qualification must also have achieved a suitable Level 2 qualification in English and maths as defined by the Department for Education on the Early Years Qualifications List published on GOV.UK.’

Other updates include references to the Prevent Duty guidance, and training for staff on female genital mutilation.

The new framework says ‘training made available by the provider must enable staff to identify signs of possible abuse and neglect at the earliest opportunity, and to respond in a timely and appropriate way. These may include – any reasons to suspect neglect or abuse outside the setting, for example in the child’s home, or that a girl may have been subjected to (or is at risk of) female genital mutilation.’

There is also information about DBS disclosures and barred list, which reminds providers to check disclosures for employees and consider whether they contain any information that would suggest a person is unsuitable for a position before they start work with children.

It says providers can check the status of a disclosure if a potential or existing employee has subscribed to the online DBS Update service. Where a check identifies there has been a change to the disclosure details, an enhanced DBS disclosure must be applied for.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Mention is also given to the 2011 physical activity guidelines, to which providers ‘may wish to refer’. Dr Lala Manners, director of Active Matters, said this does not go far enough.

In a letter to Nursery World, Dr Manners said, ‘The Chief Medical Officers’ guidelines have been relegated to a footnote on page eight, as “guidance on physical activity that providers may wish to refer to”.

‘What an abject dereliction of duty by all concerned. Where is the incentive for anyone to read, let alone implement or embed, these guidelines in daily practice?

‘How come an initiative that was deemed important enough by the Department of Health to be included in the Obesity Strategy is considered completely superfluous by the DfE?’

Read Dr Manners’ letter.
PAEDIATRIC FIRST-AID TRAINING

The full PFA training covers:

What to do if a child is having an anaphylactic shock or electric shock;
has suffered burns or scalds, a suspected fracture, head, neck or back injuries;
has suspected poisoning, a foreign body, eye injury, bite or sting;
is suffering from the effects of extreme heat or cold; or
is having a diabetic emergency, an asthma attack, allergic reaction or suspected meningitis.
Understanding the role and responsibilities of a paediatric first-aider.
The emergency PFA covers:

Assessing an emergency situation and prioritising what action to take.
Helping a baby or child who is unresponsive and breathing normally or not breathing normally.
Helping a baby or child having a seizure, choking or bleeding, or suffering from shock caused by severe blood loss.
Great news in the UK that many more workers are going to require a first aid course so that they can work. Make sure you get yourself trained at a local first aid course so you can get ready in case of an emergency or if this requirement comes to fruition in Australia.

CPR saves lives

March 10th, 2017

CPR performed correctly can save lives. Simple Instruction wants our Northern Beaches community to get trained in First Aid and CPR. Simple Isntruction provides the Northern Beaches community with online, cheap, accessible First Aid and CPR courses at the (DYRSL) Dee Why RSL.

Six in ten bystanders won’t give a cardiac arrest victim first aid: Up to 1,000 lives a year could be saved if more people attempted to help
Just four in ten prepared to attempt to keep someone alive using first aid
By the time ambulance staff arrive valuable minutes may have been lost
New report from the British Heart Foundation estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate
By Colin Fernandez Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 11:49 +11:00, 6 March 2017 | UPDATED: 03:40 +11:00, 7 March 2017

People are dying needlessly from heart attacks because bystanders are unwilling to step in to carry out life-saving techniques.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid.

This compares to more than seven out of ten people (73 per cent) in Norway, where survival rates from cardiac arrest are three times higher than in the UK.

By the time ambulance staff arrive to treat a patient, valuable minutes may have been lost which will increase the risk of death.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above
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Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above

A new report from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) estimated a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims.

The two main lifesaving methods for someone undergoing a heart attack are cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation.

CPR involves giving regular chest compressions to make the heart pump blood around the body.

Defibrillators are portable machines that give electric shocks to jolt the heart into beating in a regular rhythm.

The machines are designed to be used by untrained members of the public and are stationed in many busy places like shopping centres or supermarkets.

A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above
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A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above

The chances of someone who has had a cardiac arrest drops by around 10 per cent for every minute that they do not get either CPR or defibrillation.

After ten minutes without either technique, the chances of survival are just 2 per cent at best.

If somebody has a cardiac arrest, an ambulance should be called and CPR attempted.

The BHF advise that if there are more than one person present when someone has had a heart attack, one person should stay with the victim and carry out CPR while the other goes to look for a defibrillator machine – asking emergency services if they are not sure.

Once the defibrillator box is opened, a recorded voice gives easy instructions on where to place pads on a person’s chest.

The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present
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The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present

Users then simply press a large button to start electrical shocks to the person’ s heart.

The defibrillator will not work unless the person is having a cardiac arrest – meaning people cannot make the situation worse by using one.

Previous research has found the survival rate in England for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is 8.6 per cent, compared to 20 per cent in Seattle and 25 per cent in Norway.

A cardiac arrest is commonly caused when a person has a problem with their heart.

The person is unconscious and there are no other signs of life such as breathing or movement.

Ambulance services in England attempt resuscitation on nearly 30,000 people suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest each year.

Only 7 – 8 per cent of people on whom resuscitation is attempted manage to survive to leave hospital.

But the charity wants to raise awareness among the public that survival can be increased to up to 40 per cent through the early use of CPR and defibrillators.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said
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Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said

The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above
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The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above

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Its report, Resuscitation To Recovery, says that simply waiting for the emergency services to arrive means lives are lost that could be saved.

It also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, the report said.

Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, medical director at the BHF, said: ‘Cardiac arrest survival rates in England are disappointingly low and have remained so for many years,

‘There is potential to save thousands of lives but we urgently need to change how we think about cardiac arrest care.

‘It’s clear that we need a revolution in CPR by educating more people in simple lifesaving skills and the use of external defibrillators, and for the subsequent care of a resuscitated patient to be more consistent and streamlined.’

Professor Huon Gray, national clinical director for heart disease at NHS England, said: ‘Thousands of deaths from cardiac arrests could be prevented every year, but we need to work with the public, the emergency services and hospitals in order to achieve this.

‘Currently, there is significant variation in treatment around the country so it is vital that we provide all people with the best possible chances of survival, wherever they live.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4284624/1-000-lives-year-saved-did-aid.html#ixzz4asw90oQ6
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4284624/1-000-lives-year-saved-did-aid.html

North Shore First Aid Course – Provide First Aid and Provide CPR

January 11th, 2017

Simple Instruction is based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney at the Dee Why RSL but prides itself on catering for all of Sydney. The North Shore is the Northern Beaches close neighbour and we are seeing people coming to our First Aid and CPR training courses from Mosman, Cammeray, Naremburn, Willoughby, Crows Nest, North Sydney, Neutral Bay, Cremorne and Chatswood. In fact a lot of people would rather travel and park at the Dee Why RSL than battle traffic to get into Sydney’s CBD.

Simple Instruction has been catering for the Northern Beaches and North Shore for the past 7 years and we support local business and initiatives. We pride ourselves on customer service and cater to your needs from start to finish.

Simple Instruction already caters for many childcare centers and gyms by providing private courses and we have great feedback from all staff and personal trainers with many returning for their renewals.

Make a payment to book a course online via our website.

First Aid treatment for fainting – Northern Beaches local First Aid provider

January 10th, 2017

Simple Instruction prides itself of having up-to-date and relevant information for our clients when they complete a first aid or CPR course. With the heatwave upon us it is important to remember what to do if someone you know faints and the first aid treatment you need to provide. Simple Instruction keeps it Simple – If conscious Lay down and elevate the legs of the casualty.

Book online to a Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004. Course are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Fainting is a brief episode of unconsciousness caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure. The most likely cause of this sudden drop will either be some change in the blood vessels or the heartbeat itself.

Blood vessels continually adjust their width to ensure a constant blood pressure. For instance, the vessels constrict (tighten) when we stand up to counteract the effects of gravity. Temporary low blood pressure can be caused by various events that prompt blood vessels to dilate (expand), including extreme heat, emotional distress or pain. The lack of blood to the brain causes loss of consciousness.

Most fainting will pass quickly and won’t be serious. Usually, a fainting episode will only last a few seconds, although it will make the person feel unwell and recovery may take several minutes. If a person doesn’t recover quickly, always seek urgent medical attention.

Symptoms of fainting
The symptoms of a faint include:
  • Dizziness
  • Light-headedness
  • A pale face
  • Perspiration
  • Heightened anxiety and restlessness
  • Nausea
  • Collapse
  • Unconsciousness, for a few seconds
  • Full recovery after a few minutes.
Occasionally, a collapse may be caused by a more serious event such as a stroke or a disturbance in the normal heart rhythm. A faint might be telling you something is wrong and further examination is sometimes important.

If a person complains of breathlessness, chest pains or heart palpitations, or if the pulse is faster or slower than expected, the person should see a doctor. Similarly, slurred speech, facial droop or weakness in any limbs are signs of a serious problem.

Causes of a drop in blood pressure
A temporary drop in blood pressure can be caused by different factors, including:
  • Prolonged standing
  • Extreme heat, which pushes blood away from the main circulatory system and into the vessels of the skin
  • Emotional distress
  • Severe pain
  • The sight of blood
  • The sight of a hypodermic needle
  • Other events that a person may find distressing.
What to do if you feel faint
If possible, lie down and elevate the feet. This may prevent a loss of consciousness. Fresh air can also help, especially if you are feeling hot. If it is not possible to lie down, put your head down as low as possible.

If you do faint, remain lying down for ten minutes. Sit up slowly when you need to get up.

First aid and fainting
First aid treatment for a person who has fainted includes:
  • Help the person lie down. A person who has fainted in a chair should be helped to the ground.
  • If the person is unconscious, roll them on their side. Check they are breathing and that they have a pulse.
  • If possible, elevate the person’s feet above the height of their head.
  • If the fainting episode was brought on by heat, remove or loosen clothes, and try to cool the person down by wiping them with a wet cloth or fanning them.
  • Assess the person for any potential injuries if they have fallen.
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000) for an ambulance if the person has not regained consciousness within a few seconds or recovered in a few minutes.
Hypotension and fainting
Low blood pressure (hypotension) is a condition characterised by blood pressure that is lower than normal or usual for the person.

Hypotension can be caused by a variety of factors including heart disease and abnormal heart rhythms, some infections, dehydration and medications for high blood pressure or certain heart conditions. Low blood pressure can also be caused by a rare disorder of the adrenal glands called Addison’s disease. Frequent fainting spells or sensations of light-headedness need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Orthostatic hypotension
Blood vessels respond to gravity by constricting (tightening). This increases or maintains blood pressure when we stand up from a sitting or lying position.

Orthostatic hypotension means that the blood vessels don’t adjust to a standing position, but instead allow the blood pressure to drop, which can trigger a fainting episode. For this reason, some people, particularly the elderly or those on blood pressure medication, should stand up from sitting or lying in bed slowly. This helps prevent fainting after sudden changes in position.

Causes of orthostatic hypotension include:

  • Nervous system diseases, such as neuropathy
  • Prolonged bed rest
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heartbeat (heart arrhythmia)
  • Changes in blood pressure medication.
Where to get help
  • Your doctor
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000).
Things to remember
  • Common causes of fainting include heat, pain, distress, the sight of blood, or anxiety and hyperventilating.
  • Lying the person down will often improve the person’s condition.
  • Frequent fainting spells need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Dehydration – know the facts. First Aid and CPR courses available.

January 10th, 2017

This urine colour chart will give you an idea of whether a person is drinking enough or is dehydrated (lost too much water from the body). Dark yellow urine - very dehydrated; drink a large bottle of water immediately. Bright yellow urine - dehydrated; drink 2-3 glasses of water now. Light yellow urine - somewhat dehydrated; drink a large glass of water now. Almost clear urine - hydrated - you are drinking enough; keep drinking at the same rate. Be Aware! If you are taking single vitamin supplements or a multivitamin supplement, some of the vitamins in the supplements can change the colour of the urine for a few hours, making it bright yellow or discoloured.

Simple Instruction is making sure you are safe over the next few days. Prevention is always better than cure – lets try stay hydrated and avoid a first aid situation in the first place. Simple Instruction is offering first aid and CPR training courses on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. Located at the DYRSL (Dee Why RSL) we cater for all suburbs including Manly, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Warriewood, Freshwater, Belrose, Bilgola, Avalon and many more. All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909, book first aid courses online through the website.

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