Archive for the ‘First Aid Courses’ category

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Every Parent should know CPR and First Aid

August 4th, 2017

A mother has revealed how the first aid classes she took helped to save her son’s life when he stopped breathing.
Rachel Taylor had just called an ambulance when 10-month-old Finnley turned blue after going into septic shock.

Fortunately the 30-year-old was able to keep a calm head and performed the life-saving procedure until paramedics arrived.
Her action saved her son’s life and Rachael and Tom Batham are now urging others to learn CPR in case they ever find themselves in a similar situation.
‘It was petrifying but I just took my mind back to that day we did first aid training and just focused on what I needed to do,’ said Rachael, who is from Heaton, Newcastle.
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR

‘I didn’t start crying because there was no time to do that.’
Finnley first fell ill a month ago with a cold, cough and temperature and doctors prescribed him antibiotics for a possible infection.

Helicopter police officer spied on people sunbathing naked and having sex
On Monday I switched on the baby monitor and left him sleeping. Half an hour later, I heard a small noise,
so went up.
‘Finn was sat but as I went over to pick him up, his face just changed, it kind of contorted. Then he keeled over and started convulsing.
‘He’d had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with.’
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR
Finnley will make a full recovery (Picture: NCJ Media)
Rachael called 999 and was told an ambulance was on its way to her home.
But just as she was about to hang up Finnley stopped fitting, stiffened, turned blue and stopped breathing.

‘Panther-like creature’ stalks group for more than a mile through woodland
Rachael added: ‘That’s when the panic started to set in. I told the operator he’d stopped breathing and asked if I should do CPR.’
An ambulance crew arrived minutes later after FInnley was taken to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where he spent a week in intensive care.
Fortunately, he will make a full recovery but Rachael is now urging all parents to take paediatric first aid.
MORE: UK

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She said: ‘I don’t want to scare people but I want to raise awareness of how important it is. Without it, we could have lost him.
‘It was reading a story similar to ours on Facebook, that prompted me to book our course. I hope this might do the same for someone else.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/08/02/mother-reveals-why-every-parent-should-know-cpr-6823531/#ixzz4oklsMOjt

First Aid Certificate on the Northern Beaches

August 2nd, 2017

Training Courses on the Northern Beaches have never been so Simple! First aid and CPR courses are available most weekends at the Dee Why RSL. Course codes – HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004

Remember to call 000 or 112 for any emergency. Enjoy the CPR video below.

Provide First Aid training course on the Northern Beaches (CPR included)

July 24th, 2017

Apply your first aid knowledge by completing a provide first aid or provide CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL.

As an added bonus for all the public on the Northern Beaches we are offering the following discount to our training courses:

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 – $100 (includes CPR, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide CPR HLTAID001 – $55 ( includes a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 – $130 (includes CPR, asthma and anaphylaxis course, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Simple Instruction is re-known for our fast, efficient, friendly and inviting courses. The online learning platform makes the pre-course work easy and students keep coming back to the courses.

Book a private course or come to a public course at the Dee Why RSL.

 

Northern Beaches Surf Lifesaver trained in first aid and CPR

July 13th, 2017

Avalon Beach SLSC should be praised for their efforts in providing first aid and CPR to a Northern Beaches man.

You can be called on at any time and this person should be praised for their efforts.

Original article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/lifesaver-praised-after-treating-man-70-who-fell-hard-on-rocks/news-story/477cd09f23298cf5d45b797c0c9376e5

Lifesaver praised after treating man, 70, who fell hard on rocks

A  MAN in his 70s who fell on rocks near the rock pool at Palm Beach yesterday morning was lucky a highly-trained lifesaver was nearby.

After being treated at the scene, the injured man was flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition with abrasions and a head injury.

The man was walking along the path near the rock pool when he fell on to the rocks below, causing a head injury that began bleeding profusely.

Avalon Beach SLSC patrol captain Nick Sampson, 23, was working on a nearby construction site when members of the public alerted him to the man’s injury.

“He had a deep cut to the head and there was a lot of blood,” Mr Sampson said.

“Apparently he felt faint and stumbled across the path and fell off the edge on to the rocks.”

Mr Sampson and others from the construction site grabbed a First-Aid kit and, along with bystanders, did what they could to stem the flow of blood from the man’s head wound until paramedics arrived.

Surf Life Saving NSW spokeswoman Donna Wishart said that after the paramedics arrived, Mr Sampson helped them administer oxygen, apply a neck brace and a defibrillator before the man was placed in an ambulance.

The man was driven to a waiting helicopter at North Palm Beach and flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition.

“The drama at Palm Beach shows just how valuable it is to have surf lifesavers trained in first aid and CPR out in the community and ready to use their skills and experience to help others,” Ms Wishart said.

Please make sure you are getting trained at the Dee Why RSL

Northern Beaches Council Lifeguard Dee Why Beach

July 11th, 2017

A MAN has returned to Dee Why Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney to thank the people who provided first aid spinal techniques after a terrifying ordeal in which he floated paralysed while struggling for air between waves.

Pooyan Shargh, 32, paid tribute to council lifeguards Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer, without whom he probably would have died.

“Thankfully, these gentlemen came and helped, and the first thing I said was, ‘I’m dying, I’m dying’,” Mr Shargh said.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by Scott Mortimer and Sean Woolnough. Picture: Phil Rogers.

Mr Shargh, 32, went bodyboarding but, on his first wave, went headfirst into the sand, suffering excruciating pain.

“Next thing I noticed, I was paralysed,” he said.

“I was underwater — I couldn’t even feel my legs. I knew straight away something had happened to my neck. I was struggling to breathe, struggling to stay afloat. I thought then. I’m not going to make it.

“Somehow, I managed to get on my back. I was just floating — I was drinking in a lot of water with every wave.”

Shockingly, he said people swam right past him and observed him floating on his back but did not stop to check if he was OK.

Mr Woolnough, 38, was the first to respond to the incident, on May 21.

He was in the lifeguard kiosk with Mr Mortimer when they noticed Mr Shargh floating on his back less than 10m offshore.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach. Picture: Phil Rogers

“We were watching him. We didn’t actually see anything happen and he was on his back, with his arms by his side — he drifted in towards a rip and someone even walked past him and just looked down,” Mr Woolnough said.

Mr Woolnough said he noticed Mr Shargh’s facial expressions were odd as he approached him on a paddleboard.

“Straight away I knew that it was a spinal problem,” he said

“I could stand so I actually got rid of my board and just floated him, because I didn’t want to move him that much.”

Pooyan Shargh with Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer.

Mr Mortimer, 47, and two off-duty lifeguards assisted in the water with a spinal board to stop Mr Shargh moving too much.

Mr Shargh was even handed back his bodyboard from lifeguards who retrieved it as part of the service.

“If it wasn’t for you guys, I never would have seen my family again,” Mr Shargh said.

“I just want to say how proud we are to have you guys around, watching over us and saving lives.”

Iran-born Mr Shargh, who moved to Dee Why five years ago, urged others to learn from his experience and not go into the surf alone.

“My mistake was going alone, especially me, or anyone that is foreign and probably less experienced than some locals, you definitely have to go with a partner and you have to try to swim within the flags, that is so important,” he said.

Northern Beaches Council aquatic services executive manager Peter Livanes said efficiencies created from the merger of the three former councils — Manly, Warringah and Pittwater — meant it could keep lifeguards on patrol longer.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach after he was found face down. Picture: Phil Rogers.

“Lifeguard presence meant our team were able to respond immediately and provide the highest level of care,” Mr Livanes said.

Mr Mortimer said that changes in shifts meant they were stationed at Dee Why during winter this season.

“This time of year, normally lifeguards are gone but we are staying longer now, just because it has been busier, winter is getting warmer.

“We are here on the weekends — two years ago we wouldn’t have been here,” Mr Mortimer said.

“The old mentality was we used to just watch the flags but now it is different — it is a whole-beach approach. We watch everything.

“You’ve got the playgrounds, surfers, bodyboarders, rock fishermen, not just the swimmers.”

Mr Livanes said the council’s professional lifeguard service conducted more than 220,000 preventive actions during the 2016/17 season.

“I’m extremely proud of the professionalism and work ethic of our team to keep the community safe,” he said. “The northern beaches has some of the best beaches in the world and our team strives to provide the highest level of beach safety to match.”

Simple Instruction provides Spinal training as part of our first aid and CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Originally published: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/bodyboarder-returns-to-thank-hero-lifeguards-after-crashing-headfirst-into-sand-at-dee-why-beach/news-story/97a3195d36e65ee22079d7d8e42fc46d

Dee Why, Northern Beaches, Sydney – HLTAID004 Training Course

July 10th, 2017

Dee Why RSL is centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Simple Instruction is conducting public First Aid and CPR courses every 5 days during the month of July and August. Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 course is for anyone in the childcare industry and covers the asthma and anaphylaxis components as well as the first aid and CPR components.

The HLTAID004 course has been price reduced for this financial year as we have seen an increase in childcare professionals taking up the opportunity. Our Registered Training Organisation RTO Allen’s Training has also reduced their costs to Simple Instruction and we have passed this onto our TAFE and child care Certificate 3 graduates.

We look forward to all child care centres taking up the opportunity to be trained by Simple Instruction in the HLTAID004 and look forward to continuing to support the Northern Beaches community. Simple Instruction also comes to your child care centre or pre school at a time that suits you.

 

What’s On? Northern Beaches Council Events – School holidays

June 30th, 2017

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 training courses provided by Simple Instruction are on some of the things happening in the July School Holidays.

All public courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) and is centrally located to cater for all suburbs from Brookvale to Avalon, Manly to Belrose and Freshwater to Mona Vale. All courses are accredited through Allen’s Training.

Simple Instruction is a proud Northern Beaches, Sydney business and want to ensure we have a safe community. Please ensure you are safe these school holidays and get trained in First Aid or CPR. Private courses are available!

If you are looking for things to do it might be wise to have a ‘staycation’ and look at the Northern Beaches Council link listed below.

http://thingstodo.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/whats-on/event-calendar

Sports First Aid Courses available on the Northern Beaches

June 27th, 2017

First Aid Course Northern Beaches, Sydney. All sports teams need to have a first aid and CPR qualified person, it just makes sense. Book in now to get trained at the Dee Why RSL or we will come to you.

Steve Lillebuen
18 Jun 2017, 8:57 p.m.
A junior footballer in Melbourne is recovering in hospital after he was hit in the face with the ball during a suburban game.

Pines Under 19s player Kadel Key collapsed and suffered breathing problems when he was hit during the game against Mt Eliza on Saturday morning.

A doctor performed CPR on the teenager before paramedics arrived and continued treatment at the Eric Bell Reserve in Frankston North, an Ambulance Victoria spokesman said.

He was taken by ambulance to The Alfred hospital in a serious condition, but his condition improved and he remained listed in a stable condition on Sunday evening.

The injury occurred when Key was hit in the face with the ball while trying to block a Mt Eliza player from kicking a goal, said Pines Club president Jeff Svigos.

“It was a freak accident,” he said.

“You see players get hit with the ball all the time, but when he didn’t get up this time it was a bit scary.”

The game was called off when the serious injury occurred near the start of the second quarter.

The club has been in touch with Key and his family.

Officials will talk about what happened with the rest of his team on Monday.

The Mt Eliza Football Club said it was thinking about the player and his family.

“Under 19s game called off just after 1/4 time after Pines player Kadel Key was seriously injured,” the club wrote on its Facebook page.

“Thoughts go out to him and his family!”

The story Junior footy player collapses, game called off first appeared on The Age.

Applying First Aid Training – St John’s First Aid Course

June 5th, 2017

CPR courses save lives. What a great effort by this pregnant women to save her husband. Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Get accredited training through Allen’s Training and Simple Instruction – we offer HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course that cover all industry requirements.

Pregnant woman saves partner’s life: ‘I would have done CPR until I collapsed’
BEN PIKE, The Sunday Telegraph
February 5, 2017 5:00am
Subscriber only
A MIRACULOUS, superhuman effort from a heavily pregnant woman has saved the life of the love of her life.

Karen Clark’s partner Colin Winn went into cardiac arrest inside their Coogee apartment on Australia Day.

Ms Clark, 36 weeks pregnant, called triple-0 at 3.35pm and was told that to begin CPR she needed to move her unconscious 87kg IT manager partner from the couch on to the floor.

“I’m thinking: ‘How the hell can I do that when I can’t even roll over in bed without grunting’,” the 37-year-old said.

Not only did she get him on to the floor but she then drew on her St John first aid training and performed CPR on him for an incredible 10 minutes ­before paramedics arrived.

The exertion required for effective CPR means medical professionals swap over every minute.

Doctors said performing CPR for 10 minutes is the equivalent of a fit person running 2km at a three-quarter pace. Ms Clark, who is expecting her first child, did it while eight months pregnant.

“But adrenaline and the man you love dying in front of you, and carrying his child, is the biggest motivator you can ever imagine,” she said.

“I would have done it until I collapsed.”

The second miracle was that the paramedics were carrying a battery-powered LUCAS2 machine, which performs CPR at 100 pumps a minute.

The machine is installed in six rapid response ambulances in the Sydney CBD and is part of a clinical trial ­between St Vincent’s Hospital, RPA Hospital and NSW Ambulance.

Since the trial started 18 months ago nine of 16 cardiac arrest patients treated at St Vincent’s have survived. The LUCAS2 machine worked on Mr Winn’s heart before the IT manager was rushed to St Vincent’s.

Mr Winn, already a dad to 10-year-old Chiara, was brought to tears when thinking about how close he was to leaving two kids fatherless. He is ­expected to make a strong recovery.

If they have a boy, the couple is considering the name Lucas — after the ­device that helped save Mr Winn.

Ms Clark brought Mr Winn back down to Earth, jokingly telling him: “Whenever I ask for a cup of tea and you complain, I will say: ‘Remember that time I saved your life?’ ”

● Ms Clark is raising money to have another LUCAS2 machine installed in NSW ambulances. Visit www.gofund me.com/Lucas-CPR-machine

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