Archive for the ‘Provide First Aid’ category

Apply First Aid Northern Beaches (Senior First Aid)

June 1st, 2017

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR specialist Simple Instruction still knows many customers are referring to the Provide First Aid Training Course HLTAID003 as the Apply First Aid Course or the Senior First Aid Course. Its nice to know that Simple Instruction stays up to date with our teaching and our naming of our training courses.

Located at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches we have been providing training courses for local High School Narrabeen Sports High School and Barrenjoey High School through participant contributions.

With clients from Avalon, Davidson, Belrose, Newport, Manly, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill, Cromer and Seaforth all singing our praises it is no wonder we are the Number 1 training organisation on the Northern Beaches.

Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR courses have provided accredited courses for the region.

Canberra First Aid – www.canberrafirstaid.com

May 28th, 2017

Canberra First Aid is offering First Aid and CPR courses to the local Canberra and surrounding communities. Ryan from Canberra First Aid has been offering Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for the last 5 years.

The Canberra First Aid team is the number 1 first aid provider in the ACT and is a preferred partner of Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR.

Book a course with Canberra First Aid today by clicking www.canberrafirstaid.com

Dee Why First Aid Course

May 28th, 2017

Dee Why First Aid training courses are available with Simple Instruction. Based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, Simple Instruction offers First Aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 training courses. Simple Instruction has been offering First and CPR training course to the Northern Beaches community for the past 8 years and has a strong reputation throughout the Sydney region.

By providing the Childcare First Aid Course HLTAID004 over the last 4 years we have catered for the Child care industry. With Child Care First Aid training courses now reduced to $150 we have seen more students trained over the last few weeks at the DYRSL (Dee Why RS:).

Accredited Childcare First Aid Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney.

April 9th, 2017

CHILDCARE workers with fraudulent first aid certificates are risking kids’ lives, the childcare watchdog has warned the federal government.

The Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) has blown the whistle on dodgy training colleges for handing out qualifications to incompetent students.

It says state childcare regulators have expressed fears that some childcare workers with first aid certificates have no idea of what to do in a medical emergency.

All staff in family daycare, and at least one carer in each long daycare centre, must be trained in first aid, anaphylaxis and asthma management.

“A situation where a student has completed one qualification and is incorrectly deemed competent, could present a serious and significant risk to children being educated and cared for,’’ ACECQA warns in a submission to the Department of Education and Training.

“A … failure of graduates to properly administer first aid to children in their care in times of emergency carries a high risk to children and could have life-threatening consequences.’’

ACECQA also criticises the poor English skills of some childcare workers and calls for mandatory literacy tests before students graduate.

It says childcare centres have complained about qualified staff who “do not possess the basic literacy skills expected of them’’.

The Australian Childcare Alliance (ACA) of private daycare centres also demanded the federal Education Department to take “bold action’’ against training colleges that fail to properly train staff.

“The very nature of the industry evolves around very young and, as such, vulnerable children who are reliant on the competency and skills of their educators,’’ it said.

NSW Early Childhood Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said the state government would “use the full extent of the law’’ to deal with dodgy childcare qualifications.

“Services and individuals that have submitted fraudulent documentation will be investigated and can be prosecuted,’’ she said.

Simple Instruction offers HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid Training and our regular HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR training courses. All courses are accredited and meet the ACECQA standards. Book a course on the Northern Beaches at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/kids-lives-at-risk-in-childcare-first-aid-fail/news-story/6d82e16b2691e177db008e7de5b1a061

First Aid Course Northern Beaches – March / April and May dates available

March 24th, 2017

First Aid and CPR training courses are now available for March, April and May. Simple Instruction is offering HLTAID003, HLTAID001, HLTAID004 training courses at our centrally located training centre within the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

Suggested training providers include St John Ambulance

All newly qualified Level 2 and 3 entrants to the early years workforce must have a paediatric first-aid (PFA) certificate within three months of starting work in order to be included in ratios.
The requirement, originally intended to start in September 2016, has been added to the revised Early Years Foundation Stage framework, effective from 3 April.

The EYFS now says all entrants who completed a Level 2 or 3 qualification on or after 30 June 2016 must have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate.

Newly qualified entrants include staff who had been apprentices or long-term students and have gained a Level 2 or 3.

Those who started work between 20 June 2016 and 2 April 2017 must hold either of the certificates by 2 July 2017 to be included in ratios.

Providers can make an exemption if staff are unable to gain a certificate due to disability.

Annex A of the framework provides further detail of what training has to be completed in order to obtain either a full or emergency PFA certificate (see box, right).

It states that settings are responsible for identifying and selecting a ‘competent’ training provider to deliver their PFA training. A number of training providers are suggested, including St John Ambulance, the Red Cross and St Andrew’s First Aid.

Training for the full PFA should last a minimum of 12 hours, and a minimum of six hours for the emergency PFA.

The certificates should be displayed in settings or made available to parents and renewed every three years.

OTHER CHANGES

The revised framework also incorporates the new Level 3 qualification requirements, replacing the GCSE-only rule.

It states, ‘To count in the ratios at Level 3, staff holding an Early Years Educator qualification must also have achieved a suitable Level 2 qualification in English and maths as defined by the Department for Education on the Early Years Qualifications List published on GOV.UK.’

Other updates include references to the Prevent Duty guidance, and training for staff on female genital mutilation.

The new framework says ‘training made available by the provider must enable staff to identify signs of possible abuse and neglect at the earliest opportunity, and to respond in a timely and appropriate way. These may include – any reasons to suspect neglect or abuse outside the setting, for example in the child’s home, or that a girl may have been subjected to (or is at risk of) female genital mutilation.’

There is also information about DBS disclosures and barred list, which reminds providers to check disclosures for employees and consider whether they contain any information that would suggest a person is unsuitable for a position before they start work with children.

It says providers can check the status of a disclosure if a potential or existing employee has subscribed to the online DBS Update service. Where a check identifies there has been a change to the disclosure details, an enhanced DBS disclosure must be applied for.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Mention is also given to the 2011 physical activity guidelines, to which providers ‘may wish to refer’. Dr Lala Manners, director of Active Matters, said this does not go far enough.

In a letter to Nursery World, Dr Manners said, ‘The Chief Medical Officers’ guidelines have been relegated to a footnote on page eight, as “guidance on physical activity that providers may wish to refer to”.

‘What an abject dereliction of duty by all concerned. Where is the incentive for anyone to read, let alone implement or embed, these guidelines in daily practice?

‘How come an initiative that was deemed important enough by the Department of Health to be included in the Obesity Strategy is considered completely superfluous by the DfE?’

Read Dr Manners’ letter.
PAEDIATRIC FIRST-AID TRAINING

The full PFA training covers:

What to do if a child is having an anaphylactic shock or electric shock;
has suffered burns or scalds, a suspected fracture, head, neck or back injuries;
has suspected poisoning, a foreign body, eye injury, bite or sting;
is suffering from the effects of extreme heat or cold; or
is having a diabetic emergency, an asthma attack, allergic reaction or suspected meningitis.
Understanding the role and responsibilities of a paediatric first-aider.
The emergency PFA covers:

Assessing an emergency situation and prioritising what action to take.
Helping a baby or child who is unresponsive and breathing normally or not breathing normally.
Helping a baby or child having a seizure, choking or bleeding, or suffering from shock caused by severe blood loss.
Great news in the UK that many more workers are going to require a first aid course so that they can work. Make sure you get yourself trained at a local first aid course so you can get ready in case of an emergency or if this requirement comes to fruition in Australia.

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney?

March 12th, 2017

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney? What a great website to see what is happening around the beautiful Northern Beaches. Manly and Northern Beaches events and visitor information website has plenty to do and great accommodation and shopping information and highlights.

Consider booking in for a Provide First Aid HLTAID003 or Provide CPR HLTAID001 course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL. We can keep all Northern Beaches locals and tourists safe while they are having fun. Book in for a online, cheap, relevant and informative course ASAP.

Check out this great site:

http://www.manlyaustralia.com.au/whats-on/

Northern Beaches First Aid Course – Allergy and Anaphylaxis

March 7th, 2017

Simple Instruction – Provide First Aid and CPR courses that cover the management of allergies and anaphylaxis. The HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting and HLTAID003 Provide First Aid courses develop ones knowledge and understanding of common allergies and what to do next. Come along to one of our first aid or CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches, Sydney to help promote safe practices.

Please see the post below originally published on: https://allergyfacts.org.au/allergy-anaphylaxis

An allergy, is an overreaction by the body’s immune system to a normally harmless substance. Substances that can trigger an allergic reaction are called allergens. Allergens may be in medication, in the environment (eg. pollens, grasses, moulds, dogs and cats), or proteins (most often) in the foods we eat. Individuals can have mild/moderate or severe allergies.

Allergies should not to be confused with an intolerance, which does not involve the immune system – see Food Intolerance.

In Australia allergies are very common. Around one in three people will develop allergies at some time during their life. The most common allergic conditions are food allergies, eczema, asthma and hay fever. Food allergy occurs in around ten percent of children¹ and approximately two percent of adults.

Having a food allergy means that when you eat a food containing that protein (allergen), the immune system releases massive amounts of chemicals, triggering symptoms that can affect a person’s breathing, stomach and gut, skin and/ or heart and blood pressure.

The same immune response occurs in drug allergy when a drug is ingested or injected and in insect allergy when a sting or bite occurs. There are also less common allergens that can also cause such an immune response.

For someone with a severe allergy, exposure to the allergen can cause a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis affects the whole body, often within minutes of exposure.

Signs of a mild to moderate allergic reaction are:

Swelling of the lips, face, eyes

Hives or welts

Tingling mouth

Abdominal pain, vomiting (these are signs of anaphylaxis for insect allergy)

Signs of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) are:

Difficult/noisy breathing

Swelling of tongue

Swelling/tightness in throat

Wheeze/persistent cough

Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice

Persistent dizziness or collapse

Pale and floppy (young children)

¹Osborne et al. Prevalence of challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy using population-based sampling and predetermined challenge criteria in infants. J Allergy Clin Immunolol 2011; 127: 668-676

Content updated January 2017

North Shore First Aid Course – Provide First Aid and Provide CPR

January 11th, 2017

Simple Instruction is based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney at the Dee Why RSL but prides itself on catering for all of Sydney. The North Shore is the Northern Beaches close neighbour and we are seeing people coming to our First Aid and CPR training courses from Mosman, Cammeray, Naremburn, Willoughby, Crows Nest, North Sydney, Neutral Bay, Cremorne and Chatswood. In fact a lot of people would rather travel and park at the Dee Why RSL than battle traffic to get into Sydney’s CBD.

Simple Instruction has been catering for the Northern Beaches and North Shore for the past 7 years and we support local business and initiatives. We pride ourselves on customer service and cater to your needs from start to finish.

Simple Instruction already caters for many childcare centers and gyms by providing private courses and we have great feedback from all staff and personal trainers with many returning for their renewals.

Make a payment to book a course online via our website.

First Aid treatment for fainting – Northern Beaches local First Aid provider

January 10th, 2017

Simple Instruction prides itself of having up-to-date and relevant information for our clients when they complete a first aid or CPR course. With the heatwave upon us it is important to remember what to do if someone you know faints and the first aid treatment you need to provide. Simple Instruction keeps it Simple – If conscious Lay down and elevate the legs of the casualty.

Book online to a Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004. Course are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Fainting is a brief episode of unconsciousness caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure. The most likely cause of this sudden drop will either be some change in the blood vessels or the heartbeat itself.

Blood vessels continually adjust their width to ensure a constant blood pressure. For instance, the vessels constrict (tighten) when we stand up to counteract the effects of gravity. Temporary low blood pressure can be caused by various events that prompt blood vessels to dilate (expand), including extreme heat, emotional distress or pain. The lack of blood to the brain causes loss of consciousness.

Most fainting will pass quickly and won’t be serious. Usually, a fainting episode will only last a few seconds, although it will make the person feel unwell and recovery may take several minutes. If a person doesn’t recover quickly, always seek urgent medical attention.

Symptoms of fainting
The symptoms of a faint include:
  • Dizziness
  • Light-headedness
  • A pale face
  • Perspiration
  • Heightened anxiety and restlessness
  • Nausea
  • Collapse
  • Unconsciousness, for a few seconds
  • Full recovery after a few minutes.
Occasionally, a collapse may be caused by a more serious event such as a stroke or a disturbance in the normal heart rhythm. A faint might be telling you something is wrong and further examination is sometimes important.

If a person complains of breathlessness, chest pains or heart palpitations, or if the pulse is faster or slower than expected, the person should see a doctor. Similarly, slurred speech, facial droop or weakness in any limbs are signs of a serious problem.

Causes of a drop in blood pressure
A temporary drop in blood pressure can be caused by different factors, including:
  • Prolonged standing
  • Extreme heat, which pushes blood away from the main circulatory system and into the vessels of the skin
  • Emotional distress
  • Severe pain
  • The sight of blood
  • The sight of a hypodermic needle
  • Other events that a person may find distressing.
What to do if you feel faint
If possible, lie down and elevate the feet. This may prevent a loss of consciousness. Fresh air can also help, especially if you are feeling hot. If it is not possible to lie down, put your head down as low as possible.

If you do faint, remain lying down for ten minutes. Sit up slowly when you need to get up.

First aid and fainting
First aid treatment for a person who has fainted includes:
  • Help the person lie down. A person who has fainted in a chair should be helped to the ground.
  • If the person is unconscious, roll them on their side. Check they are breathing and that they have a pulse.
  • If possible, elevate the person’s feet above the height of their head.
  • If the fainting episode was brought on by heat, remove or loosen clothes, and try to cool the person down by wiping them with a wet cloth or fanning them.
  • Assess the person for any potential injuries if they have fallen.
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000) for an ambulance if the person has not regained consciousness within a few seconds or recovered in a few minutes.
Hypotension and fainting
Low blood pressure (hypotension) is a condition characterised by blood pressure that is lower than normal or usual for the person.

Hypotension can be caused by a variety of factors including heart disease and abnormal heart rhythms, some infections, dehydration and medications for high blood pressure or certain heart conditions. Low blood pressure can also be caused by a rare disorder of the adrenal glands called Addison’s disease. Frequent fainting spells or sensations of light-headedness need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Orthostatic hypotension
Blood vessels respond to gravity by constricting (tightening). This increases or maintains blood pressure when we stand up from a sitting or lying position.

Orthostatic hypotension means that the blood vessels don’t adjust to a standing position, but instead allow the blood pressure to drop, which can trigger a fainting episode. For this reason, some people, particularly the elderly or those on blood pressure medication, should stand up from sitting or lying in bed slowly. This helps prevent fainting after sudden changes in position.

Causes of orthostatic hypotension include:

  • Nervous system diseases, such as neuropathy
  • Prolonged bed rest
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heartbeat (heart arrhythmia)
  • Changes in blood pressure medication.
Where to get help
  • Your doctor
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000).
Things to remember
  • Common causes of fainting include heat, pain, distress, the sight of blood, or anxiety and hyperventilating.
  • Lying the person down will often improve the person’s condition.
  • Frequent fainting spells need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

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