Archive for the ‘safe’ category

Free First Aid manual, online First Aid workbook, free CPR chart and free CPR mask

February 24th, 2018

The Northern Beaches most trusted first aid and CPR training provider. Since 2009 Simple Instruction has been providing accredited training courses both public an private to the Northern Beaches community. Our most popular courses being the Provide First Aid course HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and our Child care educators course – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

When booking a course with Simple Instruction you receive a Free First Aid manual, online First Aid workbook, free CPR chart, free CPR mask and a free First App. All courses are held on the Northern Beaches, Sydney at the Dee Why RSL and are conducted by local trainers who know the area.

Book a First Aid or CPR training course with Simple instruction today and you will make the Northern Beaches a safer place for you and your family.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the Auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

Free first aid manual and CPR face mask. Great Sydney CBD Locations.

January 17th, 2018

First Aid Course on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Book today. Excellent first aid and CPR instructors.

Aussie dad’s intuition saves his teen son’s life
A TEENAGER spent a painful 30 hours trapped in his crashed car in bushland until he was rescued by his father who hired a helicopter to find him.

When Samuel Lethbridge, 17, didn’t arrive at a friend’s home on Sunday — and when he failed to reply to messages — his family immediately feared the worst.

As his sister Megan posted frantic messages on social media asking for sightings, their father Tony Lethbridge followed his gut instinct. And that ultimately saved his son’s life.

The teenager was reported missing to police but by yesterday morning Mr Lethbridge decided to hire a chopper to find his son. And he knew exactly where to direct them to search.

“An accident happened there about five years ago … It stuck in my mind … I thought, ‘I can’t leave him out there without looking.’”

The car was eventually found 20m down a bank off the Pacific Highway at Crangan Bay, south of Newcastle. By the time emergency services were able to reach him he had been trapped with broken bones for about 30 hours.

The first on the scene initially feared what they would find inside, but were amazed when they saw his head move.

The rescue was described as extensive and difficult. Picture: Seven News
The rescue was described as extensive and difficult. Picture: Seven NewsSource:Channel 7

Mr Lethbridge was taken to John Hunter Hospital where he underwent surgery for multiple fractures, including a broken arm, leg and spinal injuries, as well as dehydration He remains in a serious condition.

“He’d been there all night. No one could see him from the road, no one at all,” NSW Ambulance superintendent Jeff Atkins said.

When rescuers found him they had to peel the roof back and cut the seats out to free him. The car was so seriously damaged after plunging through bushes as it rolled that Mr Lethbridge couldn’t move inside because he was pinned under the dash.

“He was trapped extensively in the car from the waist down and was fully conscious through the whole ordeal,” Mr Atkins said.

Once freed, he was carried up the bank on a stretcher to a waiting ambulance.

“It was a very extensive rescue, very difficult access, difficult extrication of the patient, [we’re] very lucky the young patient is still alive.”

Sister Megan Lethbridge took to Facebook last night to say how lucky she felt.

“Counting my lucky stars tonight [Sam] is doing well so far,’ she wrote.

andrew.koubaridis@news.com.au

Get trained in and accredited Provide First Aid HLTAID003 or Provide CPR HLTAID001 today. You could save a life through your training. We are located at the Dee Why RSL and have been conducting courses on the Northern Beaches of Sydney for many years. All course conducted under RTO Allen’s Training 90909.

2018 First Aid and CPR courses – Northern Beaches, Sydney

January 4th, 2018

Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training courses are back for January and February 2018. With a new year we think its time that we try and get everyone trained in the basics of first aid or CPR. Simple Instruction is a local Northern Beaches, Sydney First Aid provider for all workplaces, industries and safety requirements. Course are available at the Dee Why RSL and caters for people in suburbs across the Manly Warringah region.

Listed below are the 5 top reasons why first aid or CPR training is so important.

• Increases safety: The basis of first aid or CPR training is “prevention”. It is always better to be safe than to be sorry. Knowledge of first aid or CPR promotes the sense of safety and well being amongst people, prompting them to be more alert and safe in the surroundings they dwell in. Awareness and desire to be accident free keeps you more safe and secure, reducing the number of causalities and accidents.

• Helps save lives: If a person who is trained to give first aid administration happens to see any casualty in his vicinity, immediate action can be taken and lives be saved. While it is natural for most of us to rush to support any injured person, a trained person is more reliable, confident and in control of himself and his actions while in trauma situations.

• Helps relieve pain: Some injuries require a very simple solution like applying ice pack or a quick rub. A ride to the emergency room is not necessary, at least not for some time. In such cases, calling a person trained in first aid courses is more reliable. They can help reduce the pain by performing simple procedures and can help relieve pain at least temporarily.

• Makes people more secure: Knowing that you can save your own life when required, or that of the people you know or those in trauma during some emergency helps you relax more and be more secure. The sense of security promotes a healthy and a more confident environment around you where you and the people around you would feel more secure. The presence of such people provides reassurance to the others in the situation.

• Prevents the situation from becoming worse: A trained person would know how to keep the situation from becoming bad to worse. They will provide temporary treatment which will keep the condition of the victim from deteriorating, till professional help arrives. Something is better than nothing!

Knowledge of first aid and CPR training promotes a healthy, secure and a safer environment, and instills confidence amongst people, their families, their colleagues and associates thus making the Northern Beaches, Sydney a safer place. Basic first aid or CPR knowledge is very helpful in dealing with trauma situations. Not just the medical help they provide, but the confidence they exhibit is very helpful during casualties. Being trained to provide first aid is useful to oneself and society.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

Northern Beaches Hospital – Mona Vale Tick First Aid

November 5th, 2017

IN a world first, a northern beaches hospital has conducted research into the safest way to remove a tick.

First Aid for Tick removal provided in Simple Instruction First Aid training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital who was involved in the study, said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life-threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

“Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal. If you can remove the tick and decrease your chances of getting a reaction then that is important,” Dr Ratchford said.

Dr Ratchford said the advice was critical for those living on the northern beaches which was a known tick hotspot.

He said at Mona Vale Hospital they were seeing a year-on-year rise in tick related emergencies.

As well as dealing with minor reactions to tick bites, they were also seeing patients with cellulitis, tick typhus and those with life-threatening anaphylaxis caused by an allergy to a tick or to meat, brought on by a tick bite.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Last December an Avalon dad told the Manly Daily how he was left fearing for his life when his throat started to close up and his eyes and tongue turned black, after his wife pulled out a tick in his neck with her fingertips.

Mona Vale doctors had to give 53-year-old wool trader Michael Kiernan three emergency shots of adrenaline to help him breathe in the terrifying ordeal. Despite being bitten many times by ticks, he had never had a reaction before. Now he has to carry an lifesaving Epipen in case he gets another tick.

Michael Kiernan was left fearing for his life after a tick bite turned his eyes and tongue black.
Dr Ratchford said they saw most of their tick patients between July and December, as that was when the adult female needs its last blood meal before producing offspring.

He said during this period around two per cent of all cases at Mona Vale’s emergency department were tick-related, which was high.

The study looked at 124 patients between July and December in 2016. He said that didn’t include everyone who came to emergency with a tick bite, but a large sample of patients with tick issues.

Dr Ratchford said those on the frontline of tick emergencies had been advising people to freeze not squeeze ticks for some time.

One of the ticks removed from patients at Mona Vale Hospital. Picture: Adam Yip
However, without research to back it up health authorities have been reluctant to promote the method.

“There’s so much conflicting evidence out there on how to remove ticks, it’s a minefield,” he said.

“This is the first research looking at the best way to remove ticks.”

He said he would be submitting his research to journals in the hope of getting the information out there.

HOW TO REMOVE A TICK:
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off. If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

Provide First Aid Certificate (Formerly Apply and Senior First Aid)

October 23rd, 2017

Apply the first aid knowledge you learn from a Simple Instruction Provide First Aid and CPR course held at the Dee Why RSL on the beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney NSW. Simple Instruction is the leading HLTAID001 (Provide CPR), HLTAID003 (Provide First Aid) and HLTAID004 (Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting(childcare first aid)) in Sydney and love working with our Northern Beaches locals to make the Manly Warringah area a safe place.

We offer courses to all our locals and will attend private course across Sydney. More recently we ahve completed courses in Avalon, Balgowlah, Brookvale, Belrose, Manly, Narrabeen, Dee Why, Mona Vale, Frenchs Foorest, Mosman, Cremorne, North Sydney and Cammeray. We tailor our course to all industries and love attending our local business partners in fitness, health and many more.

By updating your first aid an CPR skills you are helping those close to you including family (baby), workmates and friends. Apply the knowledge that you learn in our relevant, fun, easy, online, cheap and energetic course to real life scenarios.

Allen’s Training is our RTO 90909 and we conduct all courses under their auspices. Do better than St John’s!

Find your White card online – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

Every Parent should know CPR and First Aid

August 4th, 2017

A mother has revealed how the first aid classes she took helped to save her son’s life when he stopped breathing.
Rachel Taylor had just called an ambulance when 10-month-old Finnley turned blue after going into septic shock.

Fortunately the 30-year-old was able to keep a calm head and performed the life-saving procedure until paramedics arrived.
Her action saved her son’s life and Rachael and Tom Batham are now urging others to learn CPR in case they ever find themselves in a similar situation.
‘It was petrifying but I just took my mind back to that day we did first aid training and just focused on what I needed to do,’ said Rachael, who is from Heaton, Newcastle.
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR

‘I didn’t start crying because there was no time to do that.’
Finnley first fell ill a month ago with a cold, cough and temperature and doctors prescribed him antibiotics for a possible infection.

Helicopter police officer spied on people sunbathing naked and having sex
On Monday I switched on the baby monitor and left him sleeping. Half an hour later, I heard a small noise,
so went up.
‘Finn was sat but as I went over to pick him up, his face just changed, it kind of contorted. Then he keeled over and started convulsing.
‘He’d had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with.’
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR
Finnley will make a full recovery (Picture: NCJ Media)
Rachael called 999 and was told an ambulance was on its way to her home.
But just as she was about to hang up Finnley stopped fitting, stiffened, turned blue and stopped breathing.

‘Panther-like creature’ stalks group for more than a mile through woodland
Rachael added: ‘That’s when the panic started to set in. I told the operator he’d stopped breathing and asked if I should do CPR.’
An ambulance crew arrived minutes later after FInnley was taken to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where he spent a week in intensive care.
Fortunately, he will make a full recovery but Rachael is now urging all parents to take paediatric first aid.
MORE: UK

Man stabbed in buttocks on platform of Leytonstone tube station

Soldier woke up to find false widow spider biting his leg

Hero computer expert who stopped cyber attack that hit the NHS is arrested
She said: ‘I don’t want to scare people but I want to raise awareness of how important it is. Without it, we could have lost him.
‘It was reading a story similar to ours on Facebook, that prompted me to book our course. I hope this might do the same for someone else.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/08/02/mother-reveals-why-every-parent-should-know-cpr-6823531/#ixzz4oklsMOjt

Northern Beaches Surf Lifesaver trained in first aid and CPR

July 13th, 2017

Avalon Beach SLSC should be praised for their efforts in providing first aid and CPR to a Northern Beaches man.

You can be called on at any time and this person should be praised for their efforts.

Original article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/lifesaver-praised-after-treating-man-70-who-fell-hard-on-rocks/news-story/477cd09f23298cf5d45b797c0c9376e5

Lifesaver praised after treating man, 70, who fell hard on rocks

A  MAN in his 70s who fell on rocks near the rock pool at Palm Beach yesterday morning was lucky a highly-trained lifesaver was nearby.

After being treated at the scene, the injured man was flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition with abrasions and a head injury.

The man was walking along the path near the rock pool when he fell on to the rocks below, causing a head injury that began bleeding profusely.

Avalon Beach SLSC patrol captain Nick Sampson, 23, was working on a nearby construction site when members of the public alerted him to the man’s injury.

“He had a deep cut to the head and there was a lot of blood,” Mr Sampson said.

“Apparently he felt faint and stumbled across the path and fell off the edge on to the rocks.”

Mr Sampson and others from the construction site grabbed a First-Aid kit and, along with bystanders, did what they could to stem the flow of blood from the man’s head wound until paramedics arrived.

Surf Life Saving NSW spokeswoman Donna Wishart said that after the paramedics arrived, Mr Sampson helped them administer oxygen, apply a neck brace and a defibrillator before the man was placed in an ambulance.

The man was driven to a waiting helicopter at North Palm Beach and flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition.

“The drama at Palm Beach shows just how valuable it is to have surf lifesavers trained in first aid and CPR out in the community and ready to use their skills and experience to help others,” Ms Wishart said.

Please make sure you are getting trained at the Dee Why RSL

Northern Beaches Council Lifeguard Dee Why Beach

July 11th, 2017

A MAN has returned to Dee Why Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney to thank the people who provided first aid spinal techniques after a terrifying ordeal in which he floated paralysed while struggling for air between waves.

Pooyan Shargh, 32, paid tribute to council lifeguards Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer, without whom he probably would have died.

“Thankfully, these gentlemen came and helped, and the first thing I said was, ‘I’m dying, I’m dying’,” Mr Shargh said.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by Scott Mortimer and Sean Woolnough. Picture: Phil Rogers.

Mr Shargh, 32, went bodyboarding but, on his first wave, went headfirst into the sand, suffering excruciating pain.

“Next thing I noticed, I was paralysed,” he said.

“I was underwater — I couldn’t even feel my legs. I knew straight away something had happened to my neck. I was struggling to breathe, struggling to stay afloat. I thought then. I’m not going to make it.

“Somehow, I managed to get on my back. I was just floating — I was drinking in a lot of water with every wave.”

Shockingly, he said people swam right past him and observed him floating on his back but did not stop to check if he was OK.

Mr Woolnough, 38, was the first to respond to the incident, on May 21.

He was in the lifeguard kiosk with Mr Mortimer when they noticed Mr Shargh floating on his back less than 10m offshore.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach. Picture: Phil Rogers

“We were watching him. We didn’t actually see anything happen and he was on his back, with his arms by his side — he drifted in towards a rip and someone even walked past him and just looked down,” Mr Woolnough said.

Mr Woolnough said he noticed Mr Shargh’s facial expressions were odd as he approached him on a paddleboard.

“Straight away I knew that it was a spinal problem,” he said

“I could stand so I actually got rid of my board and just floated him, because I didn’t want to move him that much.”

Pooyan Shargh with Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer.

Mr Mortimer, 47, and two off-duty lifeguards assisted in the water with a spinal board to stop Mr Shargh moving too much.

Mr Shargh was even handed back his bodyboard from lifeguards who retrieved it as part of the service.

“If it wasn’t for you guys, I never would have seen my family again,” Mr Shargh said.

“I just want to say how proud we are to have you guys around, watching over us and saving lives.”

Iran-born Mr Shargh, who moved to Dee Why five years ago, urged others to learn from his experience and not go into the surf alone.

“My mistake was going alone, especially me, or anyone that is foreign and probably less experienced than some locals, you definitely have to go with a partner and you have to try to swim within the flags, that is so important,” he said.

Northern Beaches Council aquatic services executive manager Peter Livanes said efficiencies created from the merger of the three former councils — Manly, Warringah and Pittwater — meant it could keep lifeguards on patrol longer.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach after he was found face down. Picture: Phil Rogers.

“Lifeguard presence meant our team were able to respond immediately and provide the highest level of care,” Mr Livanes said.

Mr Mortimer said that changes in shifts meant they were stationed at Dee Why during winter this season.

“This time of year, normally lifeguards are gone but we are staying longer now, just because it has been busier, winter is getting warmer.

“We are here on the weekends — two years ago we wouldn’t have been here,” Mr Mortimer said.

“The old mentality was we used to just watch the flags but now it is different — it is a whole-beach approach. We watch everything.

“You’ve got the playgrounds, surfers, bodyboarders, rock fishermen, not just the swimmers.”

Mr Livanes said the council’s professional lifeguard service conducted more than 220,000 preventive actions during the 2016/17 season.

“I’m extremely proud of the professionalism and work ethic of our team to keep the community safe,” he said. “The northern beaches has some of the best beaches in the world and our team strives to provide the highest level of beach safety to match.”

Simple Instruction provides Spinal training as part of our first aid and CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Originally published: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/bodyboarder-returns-to-thank-hero-lifeguards-after-crashing-headfirst-into-sand-at-dee-why-beach/news-story/97a3195d36e65ee22079d7d8e42fc46d

Northern Beaches Defibrillator Access

July 6th, 2017

Northern Beaches defibrillator roll out – well done Duncan Kerr! With this great initiative we need to make sure the Northern Beaches community is trained in CPR and defibrillator use. Please book into a HLTAID001 Provide CPR training course at the Dee Why RSL

Original Article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/public-access-defibrillators-to-be-installed-in-hightraffic-areas-on-the-northern-beaches/news-story/d6a0fdc81ee672a5f7e55349dbba2c84

Public access defibrillators to be installed in high-traffic areas on the northern beaches
Robbie Patterson, Manly Daily
July 5, 2017 12:00am

PUBLICLY accessible defibrillators would be rolled out across high-priority areas of the northern beaches as part of a campaign to improve survival chances of heart attack victims.

Frenchs Forest resident Duncan Kerr, a paramedic of 10 years, has urged Northern Beaches Council to explore the possibility of putting 24-hour public-access defibrillators in high-traffic areas.

He highlighted areas such as The Corso at Manly, Warringah Mall and high-use sporting fields as key spots.

Mr Kerr said defibrillators were often hard to access as they are usually locked away inside sport clubs.

A public access defibrillator could be installed in Manly Corso. Picture: David Swift.
“These are public-access defibrillators, which means anyone can use, ” he said.

The former Warringah councillor and member of the Cardiac Arrest Survival Foundation, pointed to the peninsula’s only device of that calibre, which has been installed at Cromer Park.

“It is a big deal, especially at night or if you are just out walking the dog and no one else is around and something happens,” he said.

“They are always accessible and always monitored, which means when you pull the defibrillator out a triple-0 call is made.”

At last week’s Northern Beaches Council meeting, infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor agreed to look into the proposal.

Northern Beaches Council infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor. Picture: Troy Snook.
“If you save one life, it is well and truly worth supporting such a proposal,” he said. “My recommendation would be that council support sporting clubs in terms of the rollout of portable defibrillators but also look at high-priority sites across the local government area (for the public-access models).”

He said the council would “see if external funding from the Office of Sport and Recreation was available”, but would also look at the council’s budget.

Mr Kerr, who plans to run for the Northern Beaches Council, said he would be pushing this as a major policy issue ahead of the September 9 election.