Archive for the ‘Simple Instruction’ category

Applying First Aid Training – St John’s First Aid Course

June 5th, 2017

CPR courses save lives. What a great effort by this pregnant women to save her husband. Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Get accredited training through Allen’s Training and Simple Instruction – we offer HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course that cover all industry requirements.

Pregnant woman saves partner’s life: ‘I would have done CPR until I collapsed’
BEN PIKE, The Sunday Telegraph
February 5, 2017 5:00am
Subscriber only
A MIRACULOUS, superhuman effort from a heavily pregnant woman has saved the life of the love of her life.

Karen Clark’s partner Colin Winn went into cardiac arrest inside their Coogee apartment on Australia Day.

Ms Clark, 36 weeks pregnant, called triple-0 at 3.35pm and was told that to begin CPR she needed to move her unconscious 87kg IT manager partner from the couch on to the floor.

“I’m thinking: ‘How the hell can I do that when I can’t even roll over in bed without grunting’,” the 37-year-old said.

Not only did she get him on to the floor but she then drew on her St John first aid training and performed CPR on him for an incredible 10 minutes ­before paramedics arrived.

The exertion required for effective CPR means medical professionals swap over every minute.

Doctors said performing CPR for 10 minutes is the equivalent of a fit person running 2km at a three-quarter pace. Ms Clark, who is expecting her first child, did it while eight months pregnant.

“But adrenaline and the man you love dying in front of you, and carrying his child, is the biggest motivator you can ever imagine,” she said.

“I would have done it until I collapsed.”

The second miracle was that the paramedics were carrying a battery-powered LUCAS2 machine, which performs CPR at 100 pumps a minute.

The machine is installed in six rapid response ambulances in the Sydney CBD and is part of a clinical trial ­between St Vincent’s Hospital, RPA Hospital and NSW Ambulance.

Since the trial started 18 months ago nine of 16 cardiac arrest patients treated at St Vincent’s have survived. The LUCAS2 machine worked on Mr Winn’s heart before the IT manager was rushed to St Vincent’s.

Mr Winn, already a dad to 10-year-old Chiara, was brought to tears when thinking about how close he was to leaving two kids fatherless. He is ­expected to make a strong recovery.

If they have a boy, the couple is considering the name Lucas — after the ­device that helped save Mr Winn.

Ms Clark brought Mr Winn back down to Earth, jokingly telling him: “Whenever I ask for a cup of tea and you complain, I will say: ‘Remember that time I saved your life?’ ”

● Ms Clark is raising money to have another LUCAS2 machine installed in NSW ambulances. Visit www.gofund me.com/Lucas-CPR-machine

Apply First Aid Northern Beaches (Senior First Aid)

June 1st, 2017

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR specialist Simple Instruction still knows many customers are referring to the Provide First Aid Training Course HLTAID003 as the Apply First Aid Course or the Senior First Aid Course. Its nice to know that Simple Instruction stays up to date with our teaching and our naming of our training courses.

Located at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches we have been providing training courses for local High School Narrabeen Sports High School and Barrenjoey High School through participant contributions.

With clients from Avalon, Davidson, Belrose, Newport, Manly, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill, Cromer and Seaforth all singing our praises it is no wonder we are the Number 1 training organisation on the Northern Beaches.

Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR courses have provided accredited courses for the region.

Fidget Spinner Accident – First Aid required

May 28th, 2017

First aid course on the Northern Beaches with Simple Instruction will teach you how to help when a child is choking. Our first aid course is the best present you can give for Christmas or even a birthday. Give the gift of saving a life with a first aid course voucher.

A 10-YEAR-OLD girl is lucky to be alive after a piece of her fidget spinner — the latest must-have toy for kids — got lodged in her throat.

Kelly Rose Joniec, from Texas, has described the terrifying moment her daughter Britton swallowed a piece of one of the wildly popular playthings and was rushed to hospital for surgery, reports The Sun.

She wrote on Facebook: “On the way home from a fun swim meet, I heard Britton make an odd retching noise in the back seat as I was driving.

“Looking back in the mirror, I saw her face turning red and drool pouring from her mouth.”

The mum pulled over and her daughter motioned to her throat. Britton had put part of the fidget spinner in her mouth to clean it and accidentally swallowed it.

The pair rushed to hospital, but doctors couldn’t tell whether the piece was in her airway or oesophagus so an ambulance rushed them to Texas Children’s Hospital near Houston.

An x-ray showed the piece of metal was in her oesophagus and it was removed through surgery.

Kelly Rose added: “Fortunately, we had a positive outcome, but it was pretty scary there for a while.”

Now she is warning other parents about the peril the toys can represent.

She said: “Not all spinners come with age-appropriate warnings. The bushings pop out easily, so …. keep in mind that these present a potential choking hazard.”

Fidget spinners were designed as stress-relieving tools to help kids deal with ADHD and anxiety.

The propeller-shaped gadgets, which come in a variety of colours, have ball bearings which allow them to spin.

You simply hold it in between your fingers, flick it and watch it spin. Some versions even light up, and they are completely silent.

Kids can compete against each other to come up with the best tricks, or to keep their gadget spinning the longest.

They are designed for those who “can’t quite keep still and need a fidget phenomenon to stop the strains and stresses whilst working”.

Promoted to beat boredom and increase concentration, some Amazon reviewers even claim the toys have helped them stop biting their nails.

But some parents claim they turn their kids into ‘morons’.

The gadgets are small enough to fit in a pocket.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission

Dee Why First Aid Course

May 28th, 2017

Dee Why First Aid training courses are available with Simple Instruction. Based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, Simple Instruction offers First Aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 training courses. Simple Instruction has been offering First and CPR training course to the Northern Beaches community for the past 8 years and has a strong reputation throughout the Sydney region.

By providing the Childcare First Aid Course HLTAID004 over the last 4 years we have catered for the Child care industry. With Child Care First Aid training courses now reduced to $150 we have seen more students trained over the last few weeks at the DYRSL (Dee Why RS:).

Accredited Childcare First Aid Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney.

April 9th, 2017

CHILDCARE workers with fraudulent first aid certificates are risking kids’ lives, the childcare watchdog has warned the federal government.

The Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) has blown the whistle on dodgy training colleges for handing out qualifications to incompetent students.

It says state childcare regulators have expressed fears that some childcare workers with first aid certificates have no idea of what to do in a medical emergency.

All staff in family daycare, and at least one carer in each long daycare centre, must be trained in first aid, anaphylaxis and asthma management.

“A situation where a student has completed one qualification and is incorrectly deemed competent, could present a serious and significant risk to children being educated and cared for,’’ ACECQA warns in a submission to the Department of Education and Training.

“A … failure of graduates to properly administer first aid to children in their care in times of emergency carries a high risk to children and could have life-threatening consequences.’’

ACECQA also criticises the poor English skills of some childcare workers and calls for mandatory literacy tests before students graduate.

It says childcare centres have complained about qualified staff who “do not possess the basic literacy skills expected of them’’.

The Australian Childcare Alliance (ACA) of private daycare centres also demanded the federal Education Department to take “bold action’’ against training colleges that fail to properly train staff.

“The very nature of the industry evolves around very young and, as such, vulnerable children who are reliant on the competency and skills of their educators,’’ it said.

NSW Early Childhood Education Minister Sarah Mitchell said the state government would “use the full extent of the law’’ to deal with dodgy childcare qualifications.

“Services and individuals that have submitted fraudulent documentation will be investigated and can be prosecuted,’’ she said.

Simple Instruction offers HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid Training and our regular HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR training courses. All courses are accredited and meet the ACECQA standards. Book a course on the Northern Beaches at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/kids-lives-at-risk-in-childcare-first-aid-fail/news-story/6d82e16b2691e177db008e7de5b1a061

Provide First Aid and Provide CPR course – relaxed, simple, fun and relevant.

March 26th, 2017

Simple Instruction likes this article about first aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 courses on the Northern Beaches. We hope you enjoy this article as well. We are trying to get the emphasis the importance of first aid training for their staff but this article on explaining first aid to students/kids is great. Simple Instruction first aid courses are designed for adults but we can come to you and complete a basic children’s first aid course or HLTAID004 courses so that they are aware especially of when to call 000. Some great ideas before you attend a first aid or CPR course here though.

“Mom, give me some ice.” Ranvir, 6, and Viraj, 4, hardly ever seem to get along. One can spot them getting on their mother’s nerves on several occasions. “Such is the case with siblings, especially boys, I guess,” says their mom, Smriti.

Last week however, Ranvir surprised his mother when he came running into the kitchen looking for ice. His brother had fallen off the bed and had got a bump on his head.

“Not only did Ranvir cajole Viraj, he even applied ice and an antiseptic cream on the wound,” says Smriti, proudly.

Smriti says that she feels a certain sense of relief knowing that her child is well equipped to be a caregiver in case there’s a need. “These are required skills you know and should not be looked upon as burdening the child.”

It’s comforting to know that children are competent, especially when it comes to first aid. “Nobody can misguide them,” she says. Plus, these are survival strategies that human beings should know.

Knowing first aid can be fascinating for children if we use the right methods. All we need to do is combine learning with our day-to-day slips and falls; our job is done.

Want to know how? Read the following 10 tips:

1) Wounds as stories

“I treat wounds while giving tips.”

Pranali, mother of a four-year-old, explains every step of the first aid that she gives to her child. Recently, he fell down the stairs and bruised his knee.

“I’m cleaning the wound with antiseptic first. This avoids infection,” she said as she started first aid. Then, she went on to explain that after cleaning, she is applying an antiseptic cream.

“I was crossing my fingers because he licks everything,” she chuckles and explains how her son took the tube of cream in his hands and looked at it as she applied.

“Shaurya stops crying and gets distracted when I involve him in doing his own first aid. I think he learns and remembers my tips,” says Pranali.

If you’re comfortable and calm while giving first aid to your child, you can help him/her remain calm during medical emergencies too. Also, you’re teaching first aid.

Sounds cool. Doesn’t it?

2) Replicate

“He’s a lot into superheroes. They thrill him,” says Ashish. His seven-year-old enjoys action-packed films and does not get anxious or scared when he witnesses accidents. That gave Ashish an idea to teach his son about first aid by replicating a few things at home.

“I used socks and cotton balls to display swellings,” when his son had wanted to see what a swelling around a wound looked like. Ashish also showed him the way to tie bandages.

“I put some tomato sauce on my arm, told my son that a wound bleeds like that, and taught him how to bandage it. The sauce made it fun!”

Ashish believes that there’s no harm being realistic with your children. They need to know how the human body reacts during adverse situations so that, god forbid, if they are in similar situations, they know what to do.

Makes sense!

Doctor doctor!3) Play doctor

Well, this is a tried and tested, age-old method that still works. Playing doctor with young kids teaches them a lot about medical emergencies while maintaining a dose of fun.

“I don’t want him to get nightmares about cuts and wounds,” says Anamika. Her son is barely three and they’ve recently bought him a doctor’s kit. Since he wants to learn how to use it, she uses playtime to teach him about first aid.

“I know he is still too young, but I thought why not start now,” she explains.

Children learn fast when they find fun and relaxation in learning which is why Anamika feels that planning out serious first-aid sessions may not work with her son. During his natural urge for playing doctor, she is teaching her son about injuries, falls, and accidents.

“He listens to it like a story. Later, he’ll know better and by then, we’ll have bypassed the fear,” she exclaims.

First aid kit!4) Make a kit

Mumbai-based preschool teacher Jhanvi tells me that making a first-aid kit together is a good way to teach children the uses of each thing that go into the kit.

It also helps them understand that the first-aid kit is to be used in case of an emergency, it isn’t a toy.

“Yes, many times my kids play with the kit and spoil the contents, especially creams. It’s risky but I need to keep the kit easy-to-reach too,” says Dipika, mother to two boys.

Making a kit together will work as a DIY activity as well as a session on the importance of first aid. Try it!

5) The priority list

“My daughter does not have patience to sit and listen. Even if it’s her favourite activity, I cannot make her sit for more than 10 minutes at a stretch.”

Ridhima’s daughter is like any other kid—she lacks patience. Making a priority list of problems where first aid might be required and teaching children about those aspects first, helps curb this problem.

So, what can be included in this list?

Stopping a wound from bleeding
Holding nostrils to stop a nosebleed
Running a burnt body part under water
Putting ice over swellings
“We made a decorated chart with kids where we drew different body parts and basic first aid for them. It was fun,” says Shradha from Notre Dame Academy, Patna.

Why don’t you try making a quick chart or list too?

6) ‘Might’ happen and not ‘will’ happen

“Don’t scare them by saying that these things will happen. That’s key to teaching first aid,” says Dr Thakrey from Mumbai-based Sai Swasthya Clinic.

“Make them feel like superheroes who have the power during any medical emergency,” he says. He explains that describing to children the gory details, plus how important it’s to manage oneself during a medical problem will scare them and first aid should work as a fun tool.

“Kids are smart enough to apply knowledge when needed, we need not push it,” he concludes.

7) All that breaks

“I introduced him to first aid for fractures by using a doll. By slowly bending the doll’s limbs, I spoke about cracked bones and he listened to me, mesmerised,” says Sheena.

Sheena is a dentist who is currently a stay-at-home mom. She enjoys passing on her medical knowledge to her six-year-old.

Sheena says that talking to kids about bones and blood supply grabs their interest. “These things are real and there’s a lot of fun in reality,” she says. She has explained to her son that when bones get hurt, blood oozes out from them, which is why they hurt so much.

In these times, one must be patient with the person who is suffering the pain. Secondly, if he comes across someone who has fallen or is complaining of a hurting bone, he should immediately call another adult to help. Calling for help is also first aid.

First aid for fractures and sprains also means making the person who has fallen sit or lie down in a comfortable position. Not touching the hurting bone is the last, but most important rule.

“Helping out without a first-aid kit also comes under first aid, doesn’t it?” asks Sheena and I agree. Don’t you?

8) Raise an alarm!

“They should know that calling an adult to help is sometimes the best help they can provide,” says Dr Thakrey.

Shalini, a marketing executive with a cosmetics firm and mother of two, says that children should be taught to raise an alarm. It’s not their job to assess a situation. By raising alarms during medical emergencies, they will help themselves out of the situation and help the person in need too.

So, teach them to raise an alarm!

9) Mind over matter!

“We dropped him and went grocery shopping next door. Our cell phones were out of reach in that basement shop. He managed alone!”

Swayam had hurt himself at the football field and was feeling faint after that. His coach did some first aid and thereafter, tried calling Swayam’s parents. He was not able to get across to them, but felt helpless since the rest of the team of six-year-olds could not have been left unattended.

While Swayam sat in a corner and waited for his parents, he decided to breathe and stay calm. He pulled out his napkin and pressed his wounds till he felt better.

“We arrived and panicked when we saw the coach panicking around him. But our son stayed calm,” say Swayam’s parents.

They add that we might not always have resources for first aid and even if we have them, they may not work if there is no presence of mind. So along with first aid, teach your kids to employ their minds too!

10) A kid is but a kid!

“Every time I talk about first aid, I talk about personal safety first,” says Swati.

She believes that the safety of her two sons is more important than them helping out. “You can’t jump into a pool to save someone even if you know how to swim,” she tells her kids.

Dr Thakrey says, “Kids are taught first aid to help. That does not mean that they fix other’s problems on their own. They also need to be taught whether a situation demands first aid or not.”

“Getting close to open wires, people who have burnt themselves, or someone injured on the road is not the business of kids,” he adds

“I don’t talk to my sons about all the scary things that might happen,” says Swati.

Don’t you think she’s right? Children need not worry about consequences as they learn first aid. All they need to focus on is that knowledge is fun and that they can help themselves if certain situations arise.

As they say, knowledge is power!

First Aid Course Northern Beaches – March / April and May dates available

March 24th, 2017

First Aid and CPR training courses are now available for March, April and May. Simple Instruction is offering HLTAID003, HLTAID001, HLTAID004 training courses at our centrally located training centre within the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL).

Suggested training providers include St John Ambulance

All newly qualified Level 2 and 3 entrants to the early years workforce must have a paediatric first-aid (PFA) certificate within three months of starting work in order to be included in ratios.
The requirement, originally intended to start in September 2016, has been added to the revised Early Years Foundation Stage framework, effective from 3 April.

The EYFS now says all entrants who completed a Level 2 or 3 qualification on or after 30 June 2016 must have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate.

Newly qualified entrants include staff who had been apprentices or long-term students and have gained a Level 2 or 3.

Those who started work between 20 June 2016 and 2 April 2017 must hold either of the certificates by 2 July 2017 to be included in ratios.

Providers can make an exemption if staff are unable to gain a certificate due to disability.

Annex A of the framework provides further detail of what training has to be completed in order to obtain either a full or emergency PFA certificate (see box, right).

It states that settings are responsible for identifying and selecting a ‘competent’ training provider to deliver their PFA training. A number of training providers are suggested, including St John Ambulance, the Red Cross and St Andrew’s First Aid.

Training for the full PFA should last a minimum of 12 hours, and a minimum of six hours for the emergency PFA.

The certificates should be displayed in settings or made available to parents and renewed every three years.

OTHER CHANGES

The revised framework also incorporates the new Level 3 qualification requirements, replacing the GCSE-only rule.

It states, ‘To count in the ratios at Level 3, staff holding an Early Years Educator qualification must also have achieved a suitable Level 2 qualification in English and maths as defined by the Department for Education on the Early Years Qualifications List published on GOV.UK.’

Other updates include references to the Prevent Duty guidance, and training for staff on female genital mutilation.

The new framework says ‘training made available by the provider must enable staff to identify signs of possible abuse and neglect at the earliest opportunity, and to respond in a timely and appropriate way. These may include – any reasons to suspect neglect or abuse outside the setting, for example in the child’s home, or that a girl may have been subjected to (or is at risk of) female genital mutilation.’

There is also information about DBS disclosures and barred list, which reminds providers to check disclosures for employees and consider whether they contain any information that would suggest a person is unsuitable for a position before they start work with children.

It says providers can check the status of a disclosure if a potential or existing employee has subscribed to the online DBS Update service. Where a check identifies there has been a change to the disclosure details, an enhanced DBS disclosure must be applied for.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Mention is also given to the 2011 physical activity guidelines, to which providers ‘may wish to refer’. Dr Lala Manners, director of Active Matters, said this does not go far enough.

In a letter to Nursery World, Dr Manners said, ‘The Chief Medical Officers’ guidelines have been relegated to a footnote on page eight, as “guidance on physical activity that providers may wish to refer to”.

‘What an abject dereliction of duty by all concerned. Where is the incentive for anyone to read, let alone implement or embed, these guidelines in daily practice?

‘How come an initiative that was deemed important enough by the Department of Health to be included in the Obesity Strategy is considered completely superfluous by the DfE?’

Read Dr Manners’ letter.
PAEDIATRIC FIRST-AID TRAINING

The full PFA training covers:

What to do if a child is having an anaphylactic shock or electric shock;
has suffered burns or scalds, a suspected fracture, head, neck or back injuries;
has suspected poisoning, a foreign body, eye injury, bite or sting;
is suffering from the effects of extreme heat or cold; or
is having a diabetic emergency, an asthma attack, allergic reaction or suspected meningitis.
Understanding the role and responsibilities of a paediatric first-aider.
The emergency PFA covers:

Assessing an emergency situation and prioritising what action to take.
Helping a baby or child who is unresponsive and breathing normally or not breathing normally.
Helping a baby or child having a seizure, choking or bleeding, or suffering from shock caused by severe blood loss.
Great news in the UK that many more workers are going to require a first aid course so that they can work. Make sure you get yourself trained at a local first aid course so you can get ready in case of an emergency or if this requirement comes to fruition in Australia.

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney?

March 12th, 2017

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney? What a great website to see what is happening around the beautiful Northern Beaches. Manly and Northern Beaches events and visitor information website has plenty to do and great accommodation and shopping information and highlights.

Consider booking in for a Provide First Aid HLTAID003 or Provide CPR HLTAID001 course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL. We can keep all Northern Beaches locals and tourists safe while they are having fun. Book in for a online, cheap, relevant and informative course ASAP.

Check out this great site:

http://www.manlyaustralia.com.au/whats-on/

CPR saves lives

March 10th, 2017

CPR performed correctly can save lives. Simple Instruction wants our Northern Beaches community to get trained in First Aid and CPR. Simple Isntruction provides the Northern Beaches community with online, cheap, accessible First Aid and CPR courses at the (DYRSL) Dee Why RSL.

Six in ten bystanders won’t give a cardiac arrest victim first aid: Up to 1,000 lives a year could be saved if more people attempted to help
Just four in ten prepared to attempt to keep someone alive using first aid
By the time ambulance staff arrive valuable minutes may have been lost
New report from the British Heart Foundation estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate
By Colin Fernandez Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 11:49 +11:00, 6 March 2017 | UPDATED: 03:40 +11:00, 7 March 2017

People are dying needlessly from heart attacks because bystanders are unwilling to step in to carry out life-saving techniques.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid.

This compares to more than seven out of ten people (73 per cent) in Norway, where survival rates from cardiac arrest are three times higher than in the UK.

By the time ambulance staff arrive to treat a patient, valuable minutes may have been lost which will increase the risk of death.

Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above
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Just four out of ten members of the public are prepared to attempt to keep someone alive undergoing a cardiac arrest using first aid, pictured above

A new report from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) estimated a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims.

The two main lifesaving methods for someone undergoing a heart attack are cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation.

CPR involves giving regular chest compressions to make the heart pump blood around the body.

Defibrillators are portable machines that give electric shocks to jolt the heart into beating in a regular rhythm.

The machines are designed to be used by untrained members of the public and are stationed in many busy places like shopping centres or supermarkets.

A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above
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A British Heart Foundation (BHF) report estimates a further 1,000 lives could be saved each year if members of the public attempted to resuscitate heart attack victims, pictured above

The chances of someone who has had a cardiac arrest drops by around 10 per cent for every minute that they do not get either CPR or defibrillation.

After ten minutes without either technique, the chances of survival are just 2 per cent at best.

If somebody has a cardiac arrest, an ambulance should be called and CPR attempted.

The BHF advise that if there are more than one person present when someone has had a heart attack, one person should stay with the victim and carry out CPR while the other goes to look for a defibrillator machine – asking emergency services if they are not sure.

Once the defibrillator box is opened, a recorded voice gives easy instructions on where to place pads on a person’s chest.

The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present
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The BHF advise looking for a defibrillator machine, pictured above, if there is more than one present

Users then simply press a large button to start electrical shocks to the person’ s heart.

The defibrillator will not work unless the person is having a cardiac arrest – meaning people cannot make the situation worse by using one.

Previous research has found the survival rate in England for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is 8.6 per cent, compared to 20 per cent in Seattle and 25 per cent in Norway.

A cardiac arrest is commonly caused when a person has a problem with their heart.

The person is unconscious and there are no other signs of life such as breathing or movement.

Ambulance services in England attempt resuscitation on nearly 30,000 people suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest each year.

Only 7 – 8 per cent of people on whom resuscitation is attempted manage to survive to leave hospital.

But the charity wants to raise awareness among the public that survival can be increased to up to 40 per cent through the early use of CPR and defibrillators.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said
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Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, pictured above, the report said

The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above
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The BHF report also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR, pictured above

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Its report, Resuscitation To Recovery, says that simply waiting for the emergency services to arrive means lives are lost that could be saved.

It also calls for all pupils in secondary schools to learn CPR.

Around 1,000 lives a year could be saved in England if more people were willing to undertake CPR, the report said.

Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, medical director at the BHF, said: ‘Cardiac arrest survival rates in England are disappointingly low and have remained so for many years,

‘There is potential to save thousands of lives but we urgently need to change how we think about cardiac arrest care.

‘It’s clear that we need a revolution in CPR by educating more people in simple lifesaving skills and the use of external defibrillators, and for the subsequent care of a resuscitated patient to be more consistent and streamlined.’

Professor Huon Gray, national clinical director for heart disease at NHS England, said: ‘Thousands of deaths from cardiac arrests could be prevented every year, but we need to work with the public, the emergency services and hospitals in order to achieve this.

‘Currently, there is significant variation in treatment around the country so it is vital that we provide all people with the best possible chances of survival, wherever they live.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4284624/1-000-lives-year-saved-did-aid.html#ixzz4asw90oQ6
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