Archive for the ‘Surf Life Saving’ category

Provide CPR instructions on a Rash Vest. Saving lives on the Northern Beaches!

November 28th, 2017
Nothing beats a first aid or CPR course but this goes a long way to helping save kids. Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Get accredited with a HLTAID001 Provide CPR certificate, HLTAID002, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID004 training course.

The Rescue Rashie, printed with CPR instructions, aims to educate parents on resuscitation

MORE than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing, so action is being taken.

Emma Blake
News Corp Australia NetworkNOVEMBER 25, 20179:17PM

 

Westpac Rescue Rashie

THERE are no more excuses.

More than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing so Westpac is taking action.

Drowning deaths peaked at 49 nationally last year, so the time is right for the Rescue Rashie, a children’s rash vest printed with step-by-step instructions for how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Almost 56 per cent of parents with kids aged between two and eight said they wouldn’t know how to do CPR in the event of an emergency, a survey has found, despite children under four accounting for 42 per cent of non-fatal drownings.

Developed with the help of paediatric first aid training and awareness organisation CPR Kids, the bright red rash vests provide thorough instructions for how to save a child’s life.

They are also a constant reminder to parents about water safety, said CPR kids founder Sarah Hunstead.

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy Piper

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy PiperSource:News Corp Australia

“Adults are nervous about what to do (in the event of a child losing consciousness) but the Rescue Rashie puts the instructions right on their child’s chest,” Ms Hunstead said.

“Not only will it give parents more confidence to go straight into CPR but when they are ding the washing or folding it up and putting it away it’s reminding them about the steps for CPR.”

Two thirds of parents did not know the correct compression to breath ratio (30 to 2) for CPR, the survey of 1000 parents also found.

Hunstead said it is important to call an ambulance but, especially in a drowning accident, you cannot wait for help.

“While you wait for the ambulance oxygen is not circulating so you need to give breaths and you’ve got to push hard and fast on their chest as soon as possible,” she said.

Ironman and Olympic swimmer Ky Hurst said water safety is number one when it comes to his kids.

“As much as I love the water and have spent my life around it I know that accidents can happen,” he said.

“The instructions on the front (of the rashie) and the bright red colour serve as a constant reminder of how to keep your children safe.”

Hurst competed in the Men's 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News Corp

Hurst competed in the Men’s 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News CorpSource:News Limited

Drowning deaths in children under five jumped by 32 per cent nationally in 2016/17.

Almost 300 people drowned in the 12 months to June 30 — almost 20 per cent of those in December, according to the Royal Lifesaving Society.

While many of our beaches are patrolled with qualified Lifesavers, almost as many people drown in swimming pools (44) as at the beach (50) so it is up to parents to know what to do in the event of an accident.

Westpac, which has sponsored the Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service for 44 years, wanted to take the next step in their commitment to water safety and educate parents about water safety, said Jessica Power, Westpac State General Manager NSW.

The UPF 50+ vests are being sold for $35 with proceeds going to Take Heart Australia to fund CPR training.

Pure Profile conducted the nationwide survey of 1,000 Australian parents who have children between the ages of two and eight years old.

Northern Beaches Surf Lifesaver trained in first aid and CPR

July 13th, 2017

Avalon Beach SLSC should be praised for their efforts in providing first aid and CPR to a Northern Beaches man.

You can be called on at any time and this person should be praised for their efforts.

Original article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/lifesaver-praised-after-treating-man-70-who-fell-hard-on-rocks/news-story/477cd09f23298cf5d45b797c0c9376e5

Lifesaver praised after treating man, 70, who fell hard on rocks

A  MAN in his 70s who fell on rocks near the rock pool at Palm Beach yesterday morning was lucky a highly-trained lifesaver was nearby.

After being treated at the scene, the injured man was flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition with abrasions and a head injury.

The man was walking along the path near the rock pool when he fell on to the rocks below, causing a head injury that began bleeding profusely.

Avalon Beach SLSC patrol captain Nick Sampson, 23, was working on a nearby construction site when members of the public alerted him to the man’s injury.

“He had a deep cut to the head and there was a lot of blood,” Mr Sampson said.

“Apparently he felt faint and stumbled across the path and fell off the edge on to the rocks.”

Mr Sampson and others from the construction site grabbed a First-Aid kit and, along with bystanders, did what they could to stem the flow of blood from the man’s head wound until paramedics arrived.

Surf Life Saving NSW spokeswoman Donna Wishart said that after the paramedics arrived, Mr Sampson helped them administer oxygen, apply a neck brace and a defibrillator before the man was placed in an ambulance.

The man was driven to a waiting helicopter at North Palm Beach and flown to Royal North Shore Hospital in a stable condition.

“The drama at Palm Beach shows just how valuable it is to have surf lifesavers trained in first aid and CPR out in the community and ready to use their skills and experience to help others,” Ms Wishart said.

Please make sure you are getting trained at the Dee Why RSL

Northern Beaches local – Guy Leech knows the importance of early Defibrillation and early CPR

April 11th, 2016

Nth Beaches – Manly Daily

Ironman Guy Leech wants TV friend’s death to make a difference, asking for firms to buy lifesaving device
April 5, 2016 12:00am
Sarah Swain – Manly Daily
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/northern-beaches/ironman-guy-leech-wants-tv-friends-death-to-make-a-difference-asking-for-firms-to-buy-lifesaving-device/news-story/083d445b2256a1c3d0d833f9cae9ac1a

A CELEBRITY fitness trainer has launched a campaign to get lifesaving medical devices into businesses and homes after losing a beloved friend to a heart attack.

World champion ironman and surf lifesaver, Guy Leech, wants firms, and even families, to invest in $2000 easy-to-use defibrillators which could mean the difference between life and death.

He believes his friend Charles Stewart, 63, known as Chucky, could have survived if one of the devices had been close when he had a heart attack in Manly, in January.

Guy Leech with his friend Charles Stewart, journalist and film maker, who died from a sudden heart attack in Manly this year. Picture: Supplied.
Leech, from Curl Curl, has trained stars including Madonna and George Clooney. He had been friends with the journalist, writer and filmmaker who used to work for Channel 9 on The Today Show, Wide World of Sports and Sports Sunday for 20 years.

He said he was like “an older brother” to him.

Chucky, from Seaforth, took part in Leech’s paddling group three times a week at Manly Cove, and was ‘strong and fit’ according to Leech

But on January 4, tragedy struck.

While the group was out in the harbour, Leech got a message that Chucky was heading back because he “wasn’t feeling 100 per cent”.

Leech want’s Chucky’s death to make a difference. He’s teamed up with defibrillator firm Physio-Control to get more into companies and homes. Picture: Troy Snook
And when the group got back to Manly Cove not long after, they noticed a man being given CPR on the grass near the beach.

Leech was shocked to realise it was his friend. He took over CPR until an ambulance arrived and a defibrillator brought back a faint heartbeat.

But it was too late, and Chucky’s life support was switched off at the Royal North Shore Hospital six days later.

Now Leech wants Chucky’s death to make a difference. He’s teamed up with defibrillator firm Physio-Control to get more into companies and homes.

Guy Leech is a former champion ironman and surf lifesaver.

Guy Leech tried to save his friend after he was found collapsed from a heart attack. Picture: Troy Snook
“It’s the difference between life and death,” he said. “More than 500 people a week have heart attacks or strokes. Unless a defibrillator is put on you within about three minutes you’ve got a 10 per cent chance of survival.

“The average time for an ambulance to arrive is 12 or 13 minutes.

“I don’t want Chucky’s death to be something that just goes by. He would want something to come from it.”

For details, visit guyleech.com.

Book your First Aid and CPR course with Simple Instruction at our Dee Why RSL training rooms. All courses include learning how to use the defibrillator. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Certified CPR training courses are essential!

August 31st, 2015

HIGH school students will not be given properly-certified CPR training despite the price tag for teaching to an entire cohort of new pupils across the state coming at only $3 million each year.

Lifesaving and medical experts have warned hundreds of people could be dying or suffering preventable brain injuries each year because most Australians remain ignorant of proper resuscitation techniques.

But the NSW government has ruled out making changes to its in-school CPR programs, which do not include any requirement that students complete fully-accredited courses.

The Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has rejected calls for compulsory, certified teaching in the skill to be part of the national curriculum.

A submission from The Sunday Telegraph — with support from St John Ambulance, the Royal Life Saving Society, Surf Life Saving NSW and the Australian Medical Association — recommended certified CPR training be made mandatory in all schools.

Royal Life Saving NSW CEO David McAllister said NSW should include the skills as a “compulsory element and not one of choice” in its classrooms and the organisation wanted a stronger commitment to CPR and first-aid across all high school years in the curriculum.

“100 per cent we support that people should learn both CPR and first aid in schools,” he said.

Some 266 people drowned across Australia in the last financial year but the organisation estimates far more are involved in serious, near-drowning incidents each year — many of which end in permanent brain damage for victims.

St John Ambulance CEO Peter LeCornu said every Australian should be taught how to properly perform CPR from early high school onwards, with regular refresher courses to stop the techniques being forgotten.

“Serious accidents don’t happen every day, but when they do happen, if CPR is not administered, the chances of survival are significantly reduced,” he said.

The first-aid service has said only 8 per cent of Australians know how to properly perform CPR and no state currently had an adequate system for teaching the skill in schools.

Surf Life Saving NSW has calculated it could deliver certified CPR training at a cost of $35 per student — or about $3 million for every Year 7 pupil in the state.

Students are currently taught resuscitation techniques including CPR between years 5 and 10, but the lessons do not include mandatory, formal qualifications.

A spokesman for the Department of Education said the government had no plans to change the current arrangements for teaching students about CPR.

“Learning First Aid, including CPR, is a mandatory part of the NSW Year 7 to 10 syllabus,” he said.

“CPR training is conducted by qualified teachers in a hands-on program using mannequins. Schools may choose to provide extra opportunities for students to build on this knowledge through such programs as the Royal Lifesaving Awards, St. John’s Ambulance Certificates, and Surf Lifesaving Awards.”

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/certified-cpr-calls-rejected-under-national-pe-school-curriculum-as-nsw-government-knocks-back-plan/story-fni0cx12-1227173410094

Book a course with Simple Instruction on Sydney’s Northern Beaches! Courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL

 

It’s a miracle, says Mick Fanning of his great white shark escape

July 31st, 2015

Three-time world surfing champion Mick Fanning says it is a miracle he escaped from his encounter with a huge shark without a scratch but showed signs of the psychological trauma he will have to deal with after his near-death experience.

The 34-year-old arrived in Sydney and faced an enormous media scrum on Tuesday afternoon before heading home to, as he said, give his mum a big hug.

“To walk away from a shark attack with not a scratch on you, it’s a miracle really,” Fanning said.

“I’m doing OK, I haven’t got a scratch on me. It’s more of an emotional, mental trauma right now.
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“It’ll probably take a couple of weeks or months to get over. I don’t know.”
Fanning denied any suggestion he was a hero, saying he just did whatever he thought could get him away from the shark.
“I don’t know whether I punched it hard or just a couple of baby punches, but I just went into fight or flight really,” he said.
Fellow Australian surfer Julian Wilson, who was competing against Fanning and came to his idol’s aid, said: “At first I was frozen.
“Mick was looking at me, a big old fish popped up behind him. It was a lot bigger than him. I saw him start to get kind of manhandled by the shark and I was kind of freaking out.
“I wasn’t moving … trying to weigh up the situation. He was kind of getting wrestled off his board and then a wave came between us and I started paddling for him, just fearing for his life.”
Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/its-a-miracle-says-mick-fanning-of-his-great-white-shark-escape-20150721-gihbtq.html#ixzz3gVhhdiWZ

WOW, Unbelievable. We are so happy to see that Mick is ok. Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR can help you learn how to cope with bleeding emergencies. Get into one of our first aid courses on The Northern Beaches soon so that you are ready to handle many first aid situations. We provide a course that is easy to understand and follow but will give you all the basic skills.

HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

December 30th, 2014

If you are completing the TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care then this is the ideal course for you. This is conducted locally on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, however, we do come to your Child Care Centre for private courses.

The HLTAID004  unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to provide a first aid response to infants, children and adults.

The HLTAID004 unit applies to educators and support staff working within an education and care setting who are required to respond to a first aid emergency, including asthmatic and anaphylactic emergencies. This unit of competency will contribute towards approved first aid, asthma and anaphylaxis training under the Education and Care Services National Law, and the Education and Care Services National Regulation (2011).

This HLTAID004 unit of competency has been approved by ACECQA and meets the requirements of “First Aid, Asthma & Anaphylaxis”.

http://www.acecqa.gov.au/

You will learn about:

  • Legal Issues and Infection control
  • DRSABCD action plan
  • The principles of first aid and its applications
  • Recognition and management of emergency situations
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Defibrillation
  • Treatment of shock, infection, fractures, bleeding and burns
  • Emergencies due to lack of oxygen, excess heat or cold
  • Recognition and management of medical conditions that may need emergency care, including heart attack, stroke, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy
  • Management of common medical emergencies
  • Treatment of poisoning including venomous bites and stings
  • Anaphylaxis and Asthma

Belrose, Narraweena, Frenchs Forest, Narrabeen, Manly, CBD, Brookvale, Cromer, Dee Why, Avalon, Pittwater, Mona Vale, Warringah, Curl Curl, Allambie, Balgowlah,  Long Reef, QueensCliff.

Complete your white card online TODAY – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

Catering for Belrose, Davidson, Frenchs Forest, Killara, Forrestville and the rest of the Northern Beaches Community First Aid and CPR courses

June 10th, 2014

The Northern Beaches of Sydney is one of the most beautiful places on earth. However, as we are so close to the coast line and the ever present danger of beaches and pools.

Simple Instruction is offering accredited First Aid and CPR courses that are cheaper and quicker than Surf Life Saving Australia and at a location that is central to the whole Northern Beaches Community. Our courses are conducted at your private facility or at the Brookvale Hotel.

First Aid and CPR has never been so Simple! We are Northern Beaches locals who give back to our community. We not only focus on water safety but all aspects of First Aid and CPR.

Simple Instruction is now conducting Emergency First Aid for Childcare providers, with the Asthma and Anaphylaxis courses a requirement in all centres.

Please contact Ian Wood – ian@simpleinstruction.com.au if you would like more information.

 

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