Posts Tagged ‘Course’

Applying First Aid Training – St John’s First Aid Course

June 5th, 2017

CPR courses save lives. What a great effort by this pregnant women to save her husband. Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Get accredited training through Allen’s Training and Simple Instruction – we offer HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course that cover all industry requirements.

Pregnant woman saves partner’s life: ‘I would have done CPR until I collapsed’
BEN PIKE, The Sunday Telegraph
February 5, 2017 5:00am
Subscriber only
A MIRACULOUS, superhuman effort from a heavily pregnant woman has saved the life of the love of her life.

Karen Clark’s partner Colin Winn went into cardiac arrest inside their Coogee apartment on Australia Day.

Ms Clark, 36 weeks pregnant, called triple-0 at 3.35pm and was told that to begin CPR she needed to move her unconscious 87kg IT manager partner from the couch on to the floor.

“I’m thinking: ‘How the hell can I do that when I can’t even roll over in bed without grunting’,” the 37-year-old said.

Not only did she get him on to the floor but she then drew on her St John first aid training and performed CPR on him for an incredible 10 minutes ­before paramedics arrived.

The exertion required for effective CPR means medical professionals swap over every minute.

Doctors said performing CPR for 10 minutes is the equivalent of a fit person running 2km at a three-quarter pace. Ms Clark, who is expecting her first child, did it while eight months pregnant.

“But adrenaline and the man you love dying in front of you, and carrying his child, is the biggest motivator you can ever imagine,” she said.

“I would have done it until I collapsed.”

The second miracle was that the paramedics were carrying a battery-powered LUCAS2 machine, which performs CPR at 100 pumps a minute.

The machine is installed in six rapid response ambulances in the Sydney CBD and is part of a clinical trial ­between St Vincent’s Hospital, RPA Hospital and NSW Ambulance.

Since the trial started 18 months ago nine of 16 cardiac arrest patients treated at St Vincent’s have survived. The LUCAS2 machine worked on Mr Winn’s heart before the IT manager was rushed to St Vincent’s.

Mr Winn, already a dad to 10-year-old Chiara, was brought to tears when thinking about how close he was to leaving two kids fatherless. He is ­expected to make a strong recovery.

If they have a boy, the couple is considering the name Lucas — after the ­device that helped save Mr Winn.

Ms Clark brought Mr Winn back down to Earth, jokingly telling him: “Whenever I ask for a cup of tea and you complain, I will say: ‘Remember that time I saved your life?’ ”

● Ms Clark is raising money to have another LUCAS2 machine installed in NSW ambulances. Visit www.gofund me.com/Lucas-CPR-machine

Apply First Aid Northern Beaches (Senior First Aid)

June 1st, 2017

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR specialist Simple Instruction still knows many customers are referring to the Provide First Aid Training Course HLTAID003 as the Apply First Aid Course or the Senior First Aid Course. Its nice to know that Simple Instruction stays up to date with our teaching and our naming of our training courses.

Located at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches we have been providing training courses for local High School Narrabeen Sports High School and Barrenjoey High School through participant contributions.

With clients from Avalon, Davidson, Belrose, Newport, Manly, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill, Cromer and Seaforth all singing our praises it is no wonder we are the Number 1 training organisation on the Northern Beaches.

Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR courses have provided accredited courses for the region.

First Aid Northern Beaches – Dee Why RSL Training Course

May 4th, 2017

First aid for Northern Beaches locals is a vital skill. Having the skills to able to save someones life is something you will never forget. Northern Beaches and Simple Instructions first aid courses are designed to help you feel ready to deal with an emergency situation. We don’t bore you with a long day of dull power point presentations we make sure that you are moving and practicing the first aid skills.

As a first responder — and as any of my professional paramedic friends will say — there’s nothing worse than attending a drowning incident involving a child and finding people standing around panicking and unsure of what to do.

With the prevalence of backyard pools in Australia and our love of the water, it’s an all too common scenario. To know that there was a chance to save that child’s life if only someone had even attempted CPR is just awful.

People panic — we get that — but first responders are human too and any incident involving a child really hits you emotionally.

Even rudimentary first aid skills could make all the difference in a drowning situation. Especially involving kids. Because with quick intervention — a drowning child has got a better chance of making it than adults do.

Statistics show that injuries and accidents are the leading cause of death in children aged 1-14 — and boys make up two thirds of that number.

Yet 40 percent of parents say they wouldn’t be confident in knowing what to do if their child — or another child or adult — were drowning and 25 percent say they wouldn’t be confident in administering CPR to a child.

I’m a parent to two kids myself and I can’t imagine any worse feeling in an emergency situation involving a child, than looking back and thinking “I wish I’d known what to do or I wish I’d done that first aid course I kept saying I’d do”.

A fairly minor accident I witnessed has always stayed with me. I saw a boy running around the edge of a swimming pool — in what seemed like slow motion, he slipped and bashed his face resulting in quite a nasty cut in his mouth.

Those kind of injuries tend to bleed a lot but aren’t necessarily serious. What really struck me was that his mum had no idea what to do and she went into shock herself because of the panic. She was screaming and crying and it was actually making her son worse.

Of course, it’s understandable. No parent can stand to see their child hurt or in pain, but if the Mum had a bit of an idea what to do she would’ve felt so much better because she had the skills to help her son.

Everyone’s busy, but in the critical moment where even a bit of first aid knowledge could save a life, I think most parents would rather be able to say they’d done all they could to prepare.

The stats say that around 50 percent of parents say they don’t have any first aid knowledge at all or wouldn’t know how to treat certain injuries.

The most common injury incidents involving kids under 15 — after car accidents — would be sporting related or falls especially from trampolines or bikes, scooters or skateboards. These often result in concussions, sprains and fractures.

Most people know what to do to stem bleeding, but I’ve lost count of the times I’ve seen a big icepack dumped on top of a break or fracture which can actually cause more pain and damage because of the pressure.

People see swelling and immediately think ice but it’s not always the right thing to do. Just even knowing a bit about assessing injuries is helpful.

Other injuries or issues we’d most commonly see affecting kids are usually to do with burns, poisoning, choking, asthma or anaphylaxis attacks.I think having a broad range of first aid skills particularly those that cover off issues most likely to affect kids is a good place to start but even only knowing something about CPR is useful.

St John Ambulance WA offers a specific nationally accredited CPR course where you can come in for half a day and train in the recovery position and basic CPR. We also run Caring For Kids courses during school hours which covers all the major first aid components, including CPR, then if you want, you can go into more advanced training too.

First aid knowledge can go such a long way in making a bad situation less awful. I think of having first aid skills, especially as a parent, as like a type of insurance on your child.

Of course they’ll help if the worst happens — and hopefully you’ll never need them — but the peace of mind is priceless too.

Provide First Aid and Provide CPR course – relaxed, simple, fun and relevant.

March 26th, 2017

Simple Instruction likes this article about first aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 courses on the Northern Beaches. We hope you enjoy this article as well. We are trying to get the emphasis the importance of first aid training for their staff but this article on explaining first aid to students/kids is great. Simple Instruction first aid courses are designed for adults but we can come to you and complete a basic children’s first aid course or HLTAID004 courses so that they are aware especially of when to call 000. Some great ideas before you attend a first aid or CPR course here though.

“Mom, give me some ice.” Ranvir, 6, and Viraj, 4, hardly ever seem to get along. One can spot them getting on their mother’s nerves on several occasions. “Such is the case with siblings, especially boys, I guess,” says their mom, Smriti.

Last week however, Ranvir surprised his mother when he came running into the kitchen looking for ice. His brother had fallen off the bed and had got a bump on his head.

“Not only did Ranvir cajole Viraj, he even applied ice and an antiseptic cream on the wound,” says Smriti, proudly.

Smriti says that she feels a certain sense of relief knowing that her child is well equipped to be a caregiver in case there’s a need. “These are required skills you know and should not be looked upon as burdening the child.”

It’s comforting to know that children are competent, especially when it comes to first aid. “Nobody can misguide them,” she says. Plus, these are survival strategies that human beings should know.

Knowing first aid can be fascinating for children if we use the right methods. All we need to do is combine learning with our day-to-day slips and falls; our job is done.

Want to know how? Read the following 10 tips:

1) Wounds as stories

“I treat wounds while giving tips.”

Pranali, mother of a four-year-old, explains every step of the first aid that she gives to her child. Recently, he fell down the stairs and bruised his knee.

“I’m cleaning the wound with antiseptic first. This avoids infection,” she said as she started first aid. Then, she went on to explain that after cleaning, she is applying an antiseptic cream.

“I was crossing my fingers because he licks everything,” she chuckles and explains how her son took the tube of cream in his hands and looked at it as she applied.

“Shaurya stops crying and gets distracted when I involve him in doing his own first aid. I think he learns and remembers my tips,” says Pranali.

If you’re comfortable and calm while giving first aid to your child, you can help him/her remain calm during medical emergencies too. Also, you’re teaching first aid.

Sounds cool. Doesn’t it?

2) Replicate

“He’s a lot into superheroes. They thrill him,” says Ashish. His seven-year-old enjoys action-packed films and does not get anxious or scared when he witnesses accidents. That gave Ashish an idea to teach his son about first aid by replicating a few things at home.

“I used socks and cotton balls to display swellings,” when his son had wanted to see what a swelling around a wound looked like. Ashish also showed him the way to tie bandages.

“I put some tomato sauce on my arm, told my son that a wound bleeds like that, and taught him how to bandage it. The sauce made it fun!”

Ashish believes that there’s no harm being realistic with your children. They need to know how the human body reacts during adverse situations so that, god forbid, if they are in similar situations, they know what to do.

Makes sense!

Doctor doctor!3) Play doctor

Well, this is a tried and tested, age-old method that still works. Playing doctor with young kids teaches them a lot about medical emergencies while maintaining a dose of fun.

“I don’t want him to get nightmares about cuts and wounds,” says Anamika. Her son is barely three and they’ve recently bought him a doctor’s kit. Since he wants to learn how to use it, she uses playtime to teach him about first aid.

“I know he is still too young, but I thought why not start now,” she explains.

Children learn fast when they find fun and relaxation in learning which is why Anamika feels that planning out serious first-aid sessions may not work with her son. During his natural urge for playing doctor, she is teaching her son about injuries, falls, and accidents.

“He listens to it like a story. Later, he’ll know better and by then, we’ll have bypassed the fear,” she exclaims.

First aid kit!4) Make a kit

Mumbai-based preschool teacher Jhanvi tells me that making a first-aid kit together is a good way to teach children the uses of each thing that go into the kit.

It also helps them understand that the first-aid kit is to be used in case of an emergency, it isn’t a toy.

“Yes, many times my kids play with the kit and spoil the contents, especially creams. It’s risky but I need to keep the kit easy-to-reach too,” says Dipika, mother to two boys.

Making a kit together will work as a DIY activity as well as a session on the importance of first aid. Try it!

5) The priority list

“My daughter does not have patience to sit and listen. Even if it’s her favourite activity, I cannot make her sit for more than 10 minutes at a stretch.”

Ridhima’s daughter is like any other kid—she lacks patience. Making a priority list of problems where first aid might be required and teaching children about those aspects first, helps curb this problem.

So, what can be included in this list?

Stopping a wound from bleeding
Holding nostrils to stop a nosebleed
Running a burnt body part under water
Putting ice over swellings
“We made a decorated chart with kids where we drew different body parts and basic first aid for them. It was fun,” says Shradha from Notre Dame Academy, Patna.

Why don’t you try making a quick chart or list too?

6) ‘Might’ happen and not ‘will’ happen

“Don’t scare them by saying that these things will happen. That’s key to teaching first aid,” says Dr Thakrey from Mumbai-based Sai Swasthya Clinic.

“Make them feel like superheroes who have the power during any medical emergency,” he says. He explains that describing to children the gory details, plus how important it’s to manage oneself during a medical problem will scare them and first aid should work as a fun tool.

“Kids are smart enough to apply knowledge when needed, we need not push it,” he concludes.

7) All that breaks

“I introduced him to first aid for fractures by using a doll. By slowly bending the doll’s limbs, I spoke about cracked bones and he listened to me, mesmerised,” says Sheena.

Sheena is a dentist who is currently a stay-at-home mom. She enjoys passing on her medical knowledge to her six-year-old.

Sheena says that talking to kids about bones and blood supply grabs their interest. “These things are real and there’s a lot of fun in reality,” she says. She has explained to her son that when bones get hurt, blood oozes out from them, which is why they hurt so much.

In these times, one must be patient with the person who is suffering the pain. Secondly, if he comes across someone who has fallen or is complaining of a hurting bone, he should immediately call another adult to help. Calling for help is also first aid.

First aid for fractures and sprains also means making the person who has fallen sit or lie down in a comfortable position. Not touching the hurting bone is the last, but most important rule.

“Helping out without a first-aid kit also comes under first aid, doesn’t it?” asks Sheena and I agree. Don’t you?

8) Raise an alarm!

“They should know that calling an adult to help is sometimes the best help they can provide,” says Dr Thakrey.

Shalini, a marketing executive with a cosmetics firm and mother of two, says that children should be taught to raise an alarm. It’s not their job to assess a situation. By raising alarms during medical emergencies, they will help themselves out of the situation and help the person in need too.

So, teach them to raise an alarm!

9) Mind over matter!

“We dropped him and went grocery shopping next door. Our cell phones were out of reach in that basement shop. He managed alone!”

Swayam had hurt himself at the football field and was feeling faint after that. His coach did some first aid and thereafter, tried calling Swayam’s parents. He was not able to get across to them, but felt helpless since the rest of the team of six-year-olds could not have been left unattended.

While Swayam sat in a corner and waited for his parents, he decided to breathe and stay calm. He pulled out his napkin and pressed his wounds till he felt better.

“We arrived and panicked when we saw the coach panicking around him. But our son stayed calm,” say Swayam’s parents.

They add that we might not always have resources for first aid and even if we have them, they may not work if there is no presence of mind. So along with first aid, teach your kids to employ their minds too!

10) A kid is but a kid!

“Every time I talk about first aid, I talk about personal safety first,” says Swati.

She believes that the safety of her two sons is more important than them helping out. “You can’t jump into a pool to save someone even if you know how to swim,” she tells her kids.

Dr Thakrey says, “Kids are taught first aid to help. That does not mean that they fix other’s problems on their own. They also need to be taught whether a situation demands first aid or not.”

“Getting close to open wires, people who have burnt themselves, or someone injured on the road is not the business of kids,” he adds

“I don’t talk to my sons about all the scary things that might happen,” says Swati.

Don’t you think she’s right? Children need not worry about consequences as they learn first aid. All they need to focus on is that knowledge is fun and that they can help themselves if certain situations arise.

As they say, knowledge is power!

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney?

March 12th, 2017

What’s on in the Northern Beaches, Sydney? What a great website to see what is happening around the beautiful Northern Beaches. Manly and Northern Beaches events and visitor information website has plenty to do and great accommodation and shopping information and highlights.

Consider booking in for a Provide First Aid HLTAID003 or Provide CPR HLTAID001 course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL. We can keep all Northern Beaches locals and tourists safe while they are having fun. Book in for a online, cheap, relevant and informative course ASAP.

Check out this great site:

http://www.manlyaustralia.com.au/whats-on/

Northern Beaches First Aid Course – Allergy and Anaphylaxis

March 7th, 2017

Simple Instruction – Provide First Aid and CPR courses that cover the management of allergies and anaphylaxis. The HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting and HLTAID003 Provide First Aid courses develop ones knowledge and understanding of common allergies and what to do next. Come along to one of our first aid or CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches, Sydney to help promote safe practices.

Please see the post below originally published on: https://allergyfacts.org.au/allergy-anaphylaxis

An allergy, is an overreaction by the body’s immune system to a normally harmless substance. Substances that can trigger an allergic reaction are called allergens. Allergens may be in medication, in the environment (eg. pollens, grasses, moulds, dogs and cats), or proteins (most often) in the foods we eat. Individuals can have mild/moderate or severe allergies.

Allergies should not to be confused with an intolerance, which does not involve the immune system – see Food Intolerance.

In Australia allergies are very common. Around one in three people will develop allergies at some time during their life. The most common allergic conditions are food allergies, eczema, asthma and hay fever. Food allergy occurs in around ten percent of children¹ and approximately two percent of adults.

Having a food allergy means that when you eat a food containing that protein (allergen), the immune system releases massive amounts of chemicals, triggering symptoms that can affect a person’s breathing, stomach and gut, skin and/ or heart and blood pressure.

The same immune response occurs in drug allergy when a drug is ingested or injected and in insect allergy when a sting or bite occurs. There are also less common allergens that can also cause such an immune response.

For someone with a severe allergy, exposure to the allergen can cause a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis affects the whole body, often within minutes of exposure.

Signs of a mild to moderate allergic reaction are:

Swelling of the lips, face, eyes

Hives or welts

Tingling mouth

Abdominal pain, vomiting (these are signs of anaphylaxis for insect allergy)

Signs of anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) are:

Difficult/noisy breathing

Swelling of tongue

Swelling/tightness in throat

Wheeze/persistent cough

Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice

Persistent dizziness or collapse

Pale and floppy (young children)

¹Osborne et al. Prevalence of challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy using population-based sampling and predetermined challenge criteria in infants. J Allergy Clin Immunolol 2011; 127: 668-676

Content updated January 2017

North Shore First Aid Course – Provide First Aid and Provide CPR

January 11th, 2017

Simple Instruction is based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney at the Dee Why RSL but prides itself on catering for all of Sydney. The North Shore is the Northern Beaches close neighbour and we are seeing people coming to our First Aid and CPR training courses from Mosman, Cammeray, Naremburn, Willoughby, Crows Nest, North Sydney, Neutral Bay, Cremorne and Chatswood. In fact a lot of people would rather travel and park at the Dee Why RSL than battle traffic to get into Sydney’s CBD.

Simple Instruction has been catering for the Northern Beaches and North Shore for the past 7 years and we support local business and initiatives. We pride ourselves on customer service and cater to your needs from start to finish.

Simple Instruction already caters for many childcare centers and gyms by providing private courses and we have great feedback from all staff and personal trainers with many returning for their renewals.

Make a payment to book a course online via our website.

First Aid treatment for fainting – Northern Beaches local First Aid provider

January 10th, 2017

Simple Instruction prides itself of having up-to-date and relevant information for our clients when they complete a first aid or CPR course. With the heatwave upon us it is important to remember what to do if someone you know faints and the first aid treatment you need to provide. Simple Instruction keeps it Simple – If conscious Lay down and elevate the legs of the casualty.

Book online to a Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004. Course are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Fainting is a brief episode of unconsciousness caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure. The most likely cause of this sudden drop will either be some change in the blood vessels or the heartbeat itself.

Blood vessels continually adjust their width to ensure a constant blood pressure. For instance, the vessels constrict (tighten) when we stand up to counteract the effects of gravity. Temporary low blood pressure can be caused by various events that prompt blood vessels to dilate (expand), including extreme heat, emotional distress or pain. The lack of blood to the brain causes loss of consciousness.

Most fainting will pass quickly and won’t be serious. Usually, a fainting episode will only last a few seconds, although it will make the person feel unwell and recovery may take several minutes. If a person doesn’t recover quickly, always seek urgent medical attention.

Symptoms of fainting
The symptoms of a faint include:
  • Dizziness
  • Light-headedness
  • A pale face
  • Perspiration
  • Heightened anxiety and restlessness
  • Nausea
  • Collapse
  • Unconsciousness, for a few seconds
  • Full recovery after a few minutes.
Occasionally, a collapse may be caused by a more serious event such as a stroke or a disturbance in the normal heart rhythm. A faint might be telling you something is wrong and further examination is sometimes important.

If a person complains of breathlessness, chest pains or heart palpitations, or if the pulse is faster or slower than expected, the person should see a doctor. Similarly, slurred speech, facial droop or weakness in any limbs are signs of a serious problem.

Causes of a drop in blood pressure
A temporary drop in blood pressure can be caused by different factors, including:
  • Prolonged standing
  • Extreme heat, which pushes blood away from the main circulatory system and into the vessels of the skin
  • Emotional distress
  • Severe pain
  • The sight of blood
  • The sight of a hypodermic needle
  • Other events that a person may find distressing.
What to do if you feel faint
If possible, lie down and elevate the feet. This may prevent a loss of consciousness. Fresh air can also help, especially if you are feeling hot. If it is not possible to lie down, put your head down as low as possible.

If you do faint, remain lying down for ten minutes. Sit up slowly when you need to get up.

First aid and fainting
First aid treatment for a person who has fainted includes:
  • Help the person lie down. A person who has fainted in a chair should be helped to the ground.
  • If the person is unconscious, roll them on their side. Check they are breathing and that they have a pulse.
  • If possible, elevate the person’s feet above the height of their head.
  • If the fainting episode was brought on by heat, remove or loosen clothes, and try to cool the person down by wiping them with a wet cloth or fanning them.
  • Assess the person for any potential injuries if they have fallen.
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000) for an ambulance if the person has not regained consciousness within a few seconds or recovered in a few minutes.
Hypotension and fainting
Low blood pressure (hypotension) is a condition characterised by blood pressure that is lower than normal or usual for the person.

Hypotension can be caused by a variety of factors including heart disease and abnormal heart rhythms, some infections, dehydration and medications for high blood pressure or certain heart conditions. Low blood pressure can also be caused by a rare disorder of the adrenal glands called Addison’s disease. Frequent fainting spells or sensations of light-headedness need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Orthostatic hypotension
Blood vessels respond to gravity by constricting (tightening). This increases or maintains blood pressure when we stand up from a sitting or lying position.

Orthostatic hypotension means that the blood vessels don’t adjust to a standing position, but instead allow the blood pressure to drop, which can trigger a fainting episode. For this reason, some people, particularly the elderly or those on blood pressure medication, should stand up from sitting or lying in bed slowly. This helps prevent fainting after sudden changes in position.

Causes of orthostatic hypotension include:

  • Nervous system diseases, such as neuropathy
  • Prolonged bed rest
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heartbeat (heart arrhythmia)
  • Changes in blood pressure medication.
Where to get help
  • Your doctor
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000).
Things to remember
  • Common causes of fainting include heat, pain, distress, the sight of blood, or anxiety and hyperventilating.
  • Lying the person down will often improve the person’s condition.
  • Frequent fainting spells need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Dehydration – know the facts. First Aid and CPR courses available.

January 10th, 2017

This urine colour chart will give you an idea of whether a person is drinking enough or is dehydrated (lost too much water from the body). Dark yellow urine - very dehydrated; drink a large bottle of water immediately. Bright yellow urine - dehydrated; drink 2-3 glasses of water now. Light yellow urine - somewhat dehydrated; drink a large glass of water now. Almost clear urine - hydrated - you are drinking enough; keep drinking at the same rate. Be Aware! If you are taking single vitamin supplements or a multivitamin supplement, some of the vitamins in the supplements can change the colour of the urine for a few hours, making it bright yellow or discoloured.

Simple Instruction is making sure you are safe over the next few days. Prevention is always better than cure – lets try stay hydrated and avoid a first aid situation in the first place. Simple Instruction is offering first aid and CPR training courses on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. Located at the DYRSL (Dee Why RSL) we cater for all suburbs including Manly, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Warriewood, Freshwater, Belrose, Bilgola, Avalon and many more. All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909, book first aid courses online through the website.

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid Course – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

October 25th, 2016

Do you think its time to complete the HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting?

Learn all the important skills to save your child.

Topics include:

CPR
Asthma Awareness
Fracture management and skin injuries
Anaphylaxis
Control of external bleeding
Medical Conditions

A local mum has stressed the benefit of learning first aid after ‘one of the scariest moments of her life’ occurred when her little girl began choking. A child choking is among every parent’s greatest fears and one which was shockingly real for Martina Cullen, the Donegal mum behind this weekend’s Bump and Baby Expo in Letterkenny. The traumatic incident involving her first child, at the age of just 10 months, left Martina regretting that she’d never learned how to respond to such a life-threatening situation. When she set about organising a two-day baby show featuring the latest products, service and expert advice for parents, top of her list was the provision of expert advice on child choking and first aid.“There were so many things I hadn’t a clue about as a first time parent but in hindsight child first aid is vitally important. “To see your baby choking is a horrific experience. Our little girl was playing on a mat when all of a sudden she went quiet. My husband lifted her up and saw she was in distress – unable to breath, gasping to get air. “In that moment we both realised that we didn’t know what to do. We tried slapping her gently on the back but didn’t want to hurt her, we tried looking in her mouth but nothing was visible. We had no idea what she had swallowed. “She was turning blue. Within 30 seconds we were in the car and on the way to the hospital which was only a few minutes from the house. My husband kept tapping her on the back the whole way. It wasn’t until we were pulling into the hospital grounds that she finally vomited and started to breathe once again. Words can’t describe the relief as we pulled into A&E and she was smiling as though completely unaware of the danger. “We were lucky, sadly it can be a different story for other families. That’s why two of our key talks during the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny in the Radisson Blu Hotel on Saturday and Sunday will be delivered by First Aid Aware on ‘What to do when a child is choking’ and ‘Choking hazards and what to look out for’.” First Aid Aware Paediatric Instructor Niall Clancy said families should be aware of the dangers to infants and young children to be best placed to deal with situations. “Choking is one of the main causes of cardiac arrest in children so it’s very important for parents and anyone responsible for children to know how to react. We’re delighted to be taking part in the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny where we’ll be giving people a chance to learn about what to do when a child is choking and allowing them to practice the techniques on mannequins. We’ll also be advising people on what dangers to look out for and explaining that if an item can fit through the inside of a toilet toll then it may represent a choking hazard,” he said. In establishing Bump and Baby Expo, Martina aimed to give parents “information that really matters” all under one roof. The career mum – who co-founded human resources and employment law consultancy, HR Team while pregnant with her second child and following a successful career as operations manager for a multinational retailer – said the event will be highly informative in everything needed from pregnancy to pre-school. “I have two bouncing baby girls aged one and three and – as anyone with young children will tell you – it can be hard to keep up with the latest information on products, child safety and health matters for mums and babies. “The whole idea behind the Bump and Baby Expo is to provide expert advice, the best products and most beneficial services needed by families with babies and young children.

Read more at: http://www.derryjournal.com/news/mum-urges-awareness-of-choking-hazards-and-first-aid-1-7528612

Book in to a Provide first aid or Provide CPR course on the Northern Beaches by checking our website at www.simpleinstruction.com.au

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