Posts Tagged ‘Simple’

Northern Beaches Hospital – Mona Vale Tick First Aid

November 5th, 2017

IN a world first, a northern beaches hospital has conducted research into the safest way to remove a tick.

First Aid for Tick removal provided in Simple Instruction First Aid training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital who was involved in the study, said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life-threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

“Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal. If you can remove the tick and decrease your chances of getting a reaction then that is important,” Dr Ratchford said.

Dr Ratchford said the advice was critical for those living on the northern beaches which was a known tick hotspot.

He said at Mona Vale Hospital they were seeing a year-on-year rise in tick related emergencies.

As well as dealing with minor reactions to tick bites, they were also seeing patients with cellulitis, tick typhus and those with life-threatening anaphylaxis caused by an allergy to a tick or to meat, brought on by a tick bite.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Last December an Avalon dad told the Manly Daily how he was left fearing for his life when his throat started to close up and his eyes and tongue turned black, after his wife pulled out a tick in his neck with her fingertips.

Mona Vale doctors had to give 53-year-old wool trader Michael Kiernan three emergency shots of adrenaline to help him breathe in the terrifying ordeal. Despite being bitten many times by ticks, he had never had a reaction before. Now he has to carry an lifesaving Epipen in case he gets another tick.

Michael Kiernan was left fearing for his life after a tick bite turned his eyes and tongue black.
Dr Ratchford said they saw most of their tick patients between July and December, as that was when the adult female needs its last blood meal before producing offspring.

He said during this period around two per cent of all cases at Mona Vale’s emergency department were tick-related, which was high.

The study looked at 124 patients between July and December in 2016. He said that didn’t include everyone who came to emergency with a tick bite, but a large sample of patients with tick issues.

Dr Ratchford said those on the frontline of tick emergencies had been advising people to freeze not squeeze ticks for some time.

One of the ticks removed from patients at Mona Vale Hospital. Picture: Adam Yip
However, without research to back it up health authorities have been reluctant to promote the method.

“There’s so much conflicting evidence out there on how to remove ticks, it’s a minefield,” he said.

“This is the first research looking at the best way to remove ticks.”

He said he would be submitting his research to journals in the hope of getting the information out there.

HOW TO REMOVE A TICK:
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off. If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

NSW ONLINE WHITECARD – Parramatta, Blacktown, Cronulla, Bondi, Cabramatta, Manly, Penrith, Macquarie Park, Camden, Liverpool

September 26th, 2017

NSW White Card provider www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au provides licences 4 work sites and the construction industry for $29. Our online white card training has advanced WHS and OHS courses throughout Sydney NSW.

You could be in Parramatta, Blacktown, Cronulla, Bondi, Cabramatta, Chatswood, Brookvale, Dee Why, Manly, Liverpool, Penrith, Macquarie Park, Camden or any other part of Sydney and get accredited whilst in the comfort of you own home. Online White Card Australia is the leading training course provider in the country. Using RTO 90909 Allen’s Training we have advanced technology to make your experience easy.

The simple, cheap $29, easy, online and best white card service has provided over 1000 white cards in 3 years. Online White Card Australia is the leader in white card industry.

Simple Instruction provides first aid and CPR training courses for the Northern Beaches and North Shore community.

$29 Online WA White Card – Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, Darwin, Perth, Melbourne, Hobart

August 20th, 2017

A simple and easy to use online white card system! $29 and you pay when you pass. The WA online white card is valid in all cities across Australia including Sydney, NSW, Brisbane, QLD, Perth, WA, Canberra,  ACT, Darwin, NT, Melbourne, VIC, Hobart, TAS and Adelaide, SA.

The beauty of our system is that you pay when you pass, Allen’s Training friendly customer service team guide you along the way and you continue to work. No face to face classes mean you can complete the course in your own home and get qualified.

Get qualified today by clicking www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

 

If on the Northern Beaches of Sydney or the North Shore of Sydney please remember we also have the Provide First Aid HLTAID003 and Provide CPR HLTAID001 courses conducted by Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR Training www.simpleinstruction.com.au and North Shore First Aid and CPR Training www.northshorefirstaid.com.au. Please make a private or public booking today. Public courses are held at the Dee Why RSL

Image result for protection on worksite

Provide First Aid training course on the Northern Beaches (CPR included)

July 24th, 2017

Apply your first aid knowledge by completing a provide first aid or provide CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL.

As an added bonus for all the public on the Northern Beaches we are offering the following discount to our training courses:

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 – $100 (includes CPR, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide CPR HLTAID001 – $55 ( includes a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 – $130 (includes CPR, asthma and anaphylaxis course, a first aid manual, CPR chart, CPR face shield).

Simple Instruction is re-known for our fast, efficient, friendly and inviting courses. The online learning platform makes the pre-course work easy and students keep coming back to the courses.

Book a private course or come to a public course at the Dee Why RSL.

 

First Aid treatment for fainting – Northern Beaches local First Aid provider

January 10th, 2017

Simple Instruction prides itself of having up-to-date and relevant information for our clients when they complete a first aid or CPR course. With the heatwave upon us it is important to remember what to do if someone you know faints and the first aid treatment you need to provide. Simple Instruction keeps it Simple – If conscious Lay down and elevate the legs of the casualty.

Book online to a Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004. Course are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Fainting is a brief episode of unconsciousness caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure. The most likely cause of this sudden drop will either be some change in the blood vessels or the heartbeat itself.

Blood vessels continually adjust their width to ensure a constant blood pressure. For instance, the vessels constrict (tighten) when we stand up to counteract the effects of gravity. Temporary low blood pressure can be caused by various events that prompt blood vessels to dilate (expand), including extreme heat, emotional distress or pain. The lack of blood to the brain causes loss of consciousness.

Most fainting will pass quickly and won’t be serious. Usually, a fainting episode will only last a few seconds, although it will make the person feel unwell and recovery may take several minutes. If a person doesn’t recover quickly, always seek urgent medical attention.

Symptoms of fainting
The symptoms of a faint include:
  • Dizziness
  • Light-headedness
  • A pale face
  • Perspiration
  • Heightened anxiety and restlessness
  • Nausea
  • Collapse
  • Unconsciousness, for a few seconds
  • Full recovery after a few minutes.
Occasionally, a collapse may be caused by a more serious event such as a stroke or a disturbance in the normal heart rhythm. A faint might be telling you something is wrong and further examination is sometimes important.

If a person complains of breathlessness, chest pains or heart palpitations, or if the pulse is faster or slower than expected, the person should see a doctor. Similarly, slurred speech, facial droop or weakness in any limbs are signs of a serious problem.

Causes of a drop in blood pressure
A temporary drop in blood pressure can be caused by different factors, including:
  • Prolonged standing
  • Extreme heat, which pushes blood away from the main circulatory system and into the vessels of the skin
  • Emotional distress
  • Severe pain
  • The sight of blood
  • The sight of a hypodermic needle
  • Other events that a person may find distressing.
What to do if you feel faint
If possible, lie down and elevate the feet. This may prevent a loss of consciousness. Fresh air can also help, especially if you are feeling hot. If it is not possible to lie down, put your head down as low as possible.

If you do faint, remain lying down for ten minutes. Sit up slowly when you need to get up.

First aid and fainting
First aid treatment for a person who has fainted includes:
  • Help the person lie down. A person who has fainted in a chair should be helped to the ground.
  • If the person is unconscious, roll them on their side. Check they are breathing and that they have a pulse.
  • If possible, elevate the person’s feet above the height of their head.
  • If the fainting episode was brought on by heat, remove or loosen clothes, and try to cool the person down by wiping them with a wet cloth or fanning them.
  • Assess the person for any potential injuries if they have fallen.
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000) for an ambulance if the person has not regained consciousness within a few seconds or recovered in a few minutes.
Hypotension and fainting
Low blood pressure (hypotension) is a condition characterised by blood pressure that is lower than normal or usual for the person.

Hypotension can be caused by a variety of factors including heart disease and abnormal heart rhythms, some infections, dehydration and medications for high blood pressure or certain heart conditions. Low blood pressure can also be caused by a rare disorder of the adrenal glands called Addison’s disease. Frequent fainting spells or sensations of light-headedness need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Orthostatic hypotension
Blood vessels respond to gravity by constricting (tightening). This increases or maintains blood pressure when we stand up from a sitting or lying position.

Orthostatic hypotension means that the blood vessels don’t adjust to a standing position, but instead allow the blood pressure to drop, which can trigger a fainting episode. For this reason, some people, particularly the elderly or those on blood pressure medication, should stand up from sitting or lying in bed slowly. This helps prevent fainting after sudden changes in position.

Causes of orthostatic hypotension include:

  • Nervous system diseases, such as neuropathy
  • Prolonged bed rest
  • Dehydration
  • Irregular heartbeat (heart arrhythmia)
  • Changes in blood pressure medication.
Where to get help
  • Your doctor
  • In an emergency, always call triple zero (000).
Things to remember
  • Common causes of fainting include heat, pain, distress, the sight of blood, or anxiety and hyperventilating.
  • Lying the person down will often improve the person’s condition.
  • Frequent fainting spells need to be medically investigated to check for underlying causes.

Dehydration – know the facts. First Aid and CPR courses available.

January 10th, 2017

This urine colour chart will give you an idea of whether a person is drinking enough or is dehydrated (lost too much water from the body). Dark yellow urine - very dehydrated; drink a large bottle of water immediately. Bright yellow urine - dehydrated; drink 2-3 glasses of water now. Light yellow urine - somewhat dehydrated; drink a large glass of water now. Almost clear urine - hydrated - you are drinking enough; keep drinking at the same rate. Be Aware! If you are taking single vitamin supplements or a multivitamin supplement, some of the vitamins in the supplements can change the colour of the urine for a few hours, making it bright yellow or discoloured.

Simple Instruction is making sure you are safe over the next few days. Prevention is always better than cure – lets try stay hydrated and avoid a first aid situation in the first place. Simple Instruction is offering first aid and CPR training courses on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. Located at the DYRSL (Dee Why RSL) we cater for all suburbs including Manly, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Warriewood, Freshwater, Belrose, Bilgola, Avalon and many more. All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909, book first aid courses online through the website.

First Aid Care for treating Sunburn – Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR

January 9th, 2017

We know, you didn’t mean to get sunburned. You lost track of time, or nodded off, and now you can tell you’re going to be lobster-red and miserable. It can take several hours for the full damage to show itself. So at the first sign, get out of the sun and follow this expert advice from dermatologist Jeffrey Brackeen, MD, a member of The Skin Cancer Foundation.

Nobody’s perfect, and a sunburn can happen. But it’s important to take it seriously and stop it from happening again. Your risk for melanoma doubles if you’ve had more than five sunburns.

1. Act Fast to Cool It Down

If you’re near a cold pool, lake or ocean, take a quick dip to cool your skin, but only for a few seconds so you don’t prolong your exposure. Then cover up and get out of the sun immediately. Continue to cool the burn with cold compresses. You can use ice to make ice water for a cold compress, but don’t apply ice directly to the sunburn. Or take a cool shower or bath, but not for too long, which can be drying, and avoid harsh soap, which might irritate the skin even more.

2. Moisturize While Skin Is Damp

While skin is still damp, use a gentle moisturizing lotion (but not petroleum or oil-based ointments, which may trap the heat and make the burn worse). Repeat to keep burned or peeling skin moist over the next few days.

3. Decrease the Inflammation

At the first sign of sunburn, taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin, can help with discomfort and inflammation, says Dr. Brackeen, who practices at the Skin Cancer Institute in Lubbock, Texas. You can continue with the NSAIDs as directed till the burn feels better. You can also use a 1 percent over-the-counter cortisone cream as directed for a few days to help calm redness and swelling. Aloe vera may also soothe mild burns and is generally considered safe. Wear loose, soft, breathable clothing to avoid further skin irritation, and stay out of the sun.

4. Replenish Your Fluids

Burns draw fluid to the skin’s surface and away from the rest of the body, so you may become dehydrated, explains Dr. Brackeen. It’s important to rehydrate by drinking extra liquids, including water and sports drinks that help to replenish electrolytes, immediately and while your skin heals.

5. See a Doctor If …

You should seek medical help if you or a child has severe blistering over a large portion of the body, has a fever and chills, or is woozy or confused. Don’t scratch or pop blisters, which can lead to infection. Signs of infection include red streaks or oozing pus.

Bottom line: Your skin will heal, but real damage has been done. “Repeat sunburns put you at a substantial risk for skin cancer and premature skin aging, and I want people to ‘learn from the burn,’” Dr. Brackeen says. Review the guidelines in The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Prevention Handbook. Remember how bad this sunburn felt, then commit to protecting yourself from the sun every day, all year long.

Sunburn and other relevant first aid treatments are taught in Simple Instruction courses. Simple Instruction is located locally on the Northern Beaches of Sydney and is based at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL). We cater for everyone from beginners to experts and have people coming across the Manly, Warringah and Pittwater regions. If you are looking for a private course we can come to you and have visited suburbs from Avalon, Balgowlah, Mosman, Freshwater, Brookvale, Manly, Belrose, Narrabeen, Mona Vale, Warriwood, Frenchs Forest, Chatswood and many more. Please make a booking for a Provide First Aid HLTAID003 course, Provide CPR HLTAID001 course or Childcare HLTAID004 course online via the website.

 

Provide CPR Training Courses vital and available on the Northern Beaches

July 5th, 2016

Simple Instruction is not St John’s Ambulance but we provide accredited training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney that is vital to all school students learning and just as effective. Simple Instruction is a local first aid and CPR provider and have been conducting courses in Northern Beaches schools since 2009. We conduct fundraisers for school and are happy to support any Northern Beaches cause.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/the-hills/never-too-young-to-save-someones-life/news-story/c78acdba7c8c26ebcf4391266fbc0a54

Boy, 9, saves little brother’s life after he stops breathing while parents rush him to hospital

Bev Jordan, Hills Shire Times
March 28, 2016 2:02pm

WHEN his five-year-old brother Ben stopped breathing, Zachary Redwood calmly performed lifesaving CPR..

Earlier this month, the Baulkham Hills boy celebrated his ninth birthday with his little brother and extremely proud and grateful parents by his side.

Zach learnt CPR last year at a first-aid training course run by long-time St John volunteers and his scout leaders at 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Group, Jennie and Taylor Page.

Three-year-old Ben with his big brother Zach, 9.
The boys’ father Julian said Ben ate a Snickers bar at a birthday party, then vomited up the peanuts. About 30 minutes later he had trouble breathing.

“We thought he might be having an asthma attack but he did not respond to treatment,” Mr Redwood said.

“At this point we realised this was now an emergency situation and decided to rush Ben to hospital.”

Mum Jenny drove Zach and Ben in her car while Mr Redwood followed in another car.

“During the trip to the hospital Ben stopped breathing, his lips turned blue, eyes rolled into the back of his head and he lost consciousness,” said Mr Redwood. “My wife was distraught.”

Ben and Zach at their Baulkham Hills home.
Mrs Redwood pulled over to the side of the road and Zach calmly put his first-aid lesson into practice, performing CPR on Ben as he had been taught to do.

“I just took my seatbelt off and I just breathed into him,” Zach said.

Mr Redwood said: “After a few minutes some colour returned to Ben’s face and lips and he regained consciousness.”

When the family arrived at The Children’s Hospital, Westmead, they were told they were lucky Zach had known how to perform CPR.

“I felt really helpless and scared,” Mrs Redwood said.

“Just knowing what to do is so important.”

Zach (right) learned CPR at a first aid course at the 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Group.
Ms Page said she couldn’t think of the story without getting emotional.

“I am so proud of (Zach),” she said.

“I feel children are never too young to learn CPR.

“Even if they can’t do it themselves because of their size, there is always a chance they can instruct an adult should the need arise.”

Julian Redwood with his sons Ben and Zac.
What to Do

■ Check for danger

■ Check if the affected person is conscious

■ If not, call 000

■ If yes, make the person comfortable

■ If unconscious, open the mouth, clear the airway

■ Check breathing

■ Start CPR if not breathing — 30 compressions, two breaths, then repeat

■ Place in recovery position when conscious

Zach (right) used the first-aid skills he learnt at Scouts to save his brother Ben’s life.
Jennie Page, a St John Ambulance superintendent and 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Leader, said learning CPR should be compulsory in schools.

She has been running annual workshops for her cubs and scouts with the help of her daughter Taylor and other St John cadets for 10 years.

“I firmly believe that all school-age children should be taught first aid, including CPR.

“You can never be too young to know how to save a life,” she told the Times.

“Even if they can’t do it themselves because of their size there is always a chance they can instruct an adult should the need arise.

“We have had three reports of children saving lives in the past 18 months,” Mrs Page said.

She said she wished all primary schools took up the free St John Ambulance First Aid in Schools program. Last year, more than 20,400 students took part in the program.

There are two programs available. One is aimed at years 3 and 4 students and the other is for students in years 5 and 6.

Up to 40 St John volunteers deliver the program across NSW.

For details, call 9745 8740 or email schoolsprogram@stjohnnsw.com.au.

CPR TRAINING THAT IS QUICK, EASY, CHEAP and INFORMATIVE – Northern Beaches, Sydney.

January 6th, 2016

Have you ever thought I should learn CPR? As a local community member of the Northern Beaches I think you should learn CPR also. Simple Instruction has CPR and First Aid courses being conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) on the beautiful Northern Beaches throughout January and February in 2016. Book in today and get trained to help someone in the future.

Sue DunlevyNews Corp Australia Network 

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/nearly-thirty-thousand-australians-will-die-of-cardiac-arrest-in-2015/news-story/03d85d4930e63641bba70c2eb2ae1a94

NEARLY thirty thousand Australians will die of cardiac arrest this year because too few bystanders have the basic CPR skills to keep them alive until an ambulance arrives.

Emergency physician Professor Paul Middleton says he’s sick of seeing patients turn up dead in emergency departments when a simple 15 minute CPR training session could have saved their lives.

He’s founded a new charity Take Heart Australia to turn that statistic around and aims to deliver CPR training to every Australian and get a heart starting defibrillator installed on every street.

The Sunday Telegraph is also calling for the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) to include certified teaching of CPR in the national curriculum.

Surf Life Saving NSW has calculated it could deliver certified CPR training at a cost of $35 per student — or about $3 million for every Year 7 pupil in the state.

Brain damage sets in three minutes after a cardiac arrest, within ten minutes the patient will be dead and an ambulance will never arrive in time to save these people, says Professor Middleton.

“Most of these arrests need a shock to restart the heart and 80 per cent of those that happen in the street should be reversed by a simple defibrillator,” he says.

“But you also need someone doing high quality CPR from the moment you go down,” he said.

“Every minute without CPR there is a ten per cent increase in mortality, and ambulance can’t arrive in under eight minutes and it’s almost always ten minutes,” he says.

“It can’t be left to the ambulance service, it has to be left to the community,” he says.

Australia’s performance in CPR is falling with just ten per cent of cardiac victims saved by the procedure in Sydney in 2010, down from 12 per cent in 2005.

This compares to the two in three people who survive a cardiac arrest in Seattle in the US where 75 per cent of the population is trained in CPR.

Life saver ... a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and death

Life saver … a defibrillator can mean the difference between life and deathSource:News Corp Australia

Citizens of Seattle are required to take CPR classes to graduate from high school and to get or renew a driver’s license, attend university or work in the public service, it also has a large number of defibrillator devices available in public buildings and police vehicles says Professor Middleton.

“The joke is if you fall asleep on a park bench in Seattle someone will do CPR on you,” he said.

Denmark has also more than doubled survival rates from cardiac arrest since 2005 by teaching schoolchildren CPR skills, making CPR training it a requirement for a driver’s licence.

The number of cardiac arrest victims who received “bystander” more than doubled in Denmark from 22% in 2001 to 45% in 2010.

Take Heart has a plan to ensure 100 per cent of Australians are trained in CPR by making CPR training it a requirement to get a drivers’ licence, go to university, get a job in the public service.

It also wants to put a $2,000 heart starting automated external defibrillator (AED) on every street in Australia.

The new organisation will try to teach 10,000 people CPR at the SCG Alliance Stadium in November, setting a new Guiness World Record.

Regional areas taking part in Take Heart Australia through satellite events include -Hawkesbury,- Shoalhaven, – Roxby Downs, SA.

Regional areas can take part by hosting their own event. They can make contact with Take Heart Australia through their website or Facebook to organise it.

Its funding a Good Sam App that will immediately dial 000 that will show where the nearest defibrillator is.

One of the biggest problems in Australia is there is now record of who has CPR training or where life saving defibrillators are stored.

Professor Middletons says there are defibrillators at most airports and train stations.

“The safest place to have a cardiac arrest in Australia is the MCG in Melbourne which has a lot of defibrillators installed,” he says.

It takes just 15 minutes to learn CPR and modern techniques don’t even require the kiss of life, however you must tilt the patient’s head back to clear the airways,

Ambulance services, fire and police services, the Royal Flying Doctor Service,

Surf Live Saving Australia, the Red Cross the chief medical officer and the Heart Foundation are all behind his plan he says.

As an emergency physician he says he’s tried to resuscitate “literally hundreds of people and of those only a tiny portion survive”.

“One of the worst bits of my job is witting with a family that’s white faced and telling them their father or their son or a loved one is gone,” he says

“I’d really like to do that less often,” he says.

Close call ... Cassandra Scott almost left her husband and children behind when she drowned at Coogee Beach. Picture: Sam Ruttyn

Close call … Cassandra Scott almost left her husband and children behind when she drowned at Coogee Beach. Picture: Sam RuttynSource:News Corp Australia

‘I nearly died’

Cassandra Scott owes her life to four bystanders on Coogee beach who knew how to do CPR and brought her back from the dead.

In 2012 the then-38-year-old funeral celebrant dived under a wave and was later found floating in the ocean, her heart had stopped.

Another swimmer Neil Clugston came to her rescue, towing her ashore where life saver Luke Twitchings was on hand to perform CPR.

Also on the beach that day was emergency physician Matthew Olivier and a Belgian tourist Olivier Costa, together they kept Cassandras heart going until an ambulance arrived.

Cassandra also needed oxygen and fortunately that was on hand at the life saver station.

“If you’re going to die, do it on a beach,” says Cassandra.

“I was a funeral celebrant at the time before I died so I felt like I went on a customer experience,” she said.

She spent five days in hospital after her rescue and suffered memory loss and a language difficulty.

United family ... Cassandra Scott with her husband Matthew Bauer and children, Nina Bauer, Stanley Bauer and Ewan Scott. Picture: Sam Ruttyn

United family … Cassandra Scott with her husband Matthew Bauer and children, Nina Bauer, Stanley Bauer and Ewan Scott. Picture: Sam RuttynSource:News Corp Australia

“I’m only alive today because those people invested in CPR,” she says.

A mother of one and a stepdaughter at the time, she has since gone on to have another child.

She keeps in close contact with her rescuers and they meet once a year on the anniversary of her cardiac arrest.

“Neil was concerned I would be mentally incapacitated and that rescuing me was not the right thing to do,” she said.

Heroes ... Cassandra Scott and her son Ewan with Neil Clugston and Luke Twitchings, who helped save her life when she drowned at Coogee Beach. Picture: Supplied

Heroes … Cassandra Scott and her son Ewan with Neil Clugston and Luke Twitchings, who helped save her life when she drowned at Coogee Beach. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

“We met a few days later and held hands and cried.”

Matthew Olivier said she was the first person whose life he had ever attempted saving.

“I didn’t know CPR when it happened but I’ve subsequently got good instruction,” she says.

Changes to the kiss of life

The “gross out” factor of performing the kiss of life on a stranger is no longer required to save someone’s life.

A little publicised change to CPR guidelines has eliminated the need for mouth to mouth contact with someone in cardiac arrest after research proved chest compressions alone were enough to keep them alive.

It’s taken the complexity out of the procedure and removed the fear of catching an infection from performing CPR says paramedic and Senior Lecturer in Paramedic Practice at University of Tasmania Suzanne Davies.

She says revulsion at the thought of placing your mouth on a stranger and breathing down their throat was a key reason so many people failed to perform CPR.

“We weren’t willing to put our mouth near someone we didn’t know, there was fear of infection, disease scare and the gross out factor,” she said.

Life or death ... learning how to resuscitate can save lives

Life or death … learning how to resuscitate can save livesSource:News Limited

The problem of remembering how to co-ordinate the breathing with the compression added to the complexity of CPR and people who were afraid of getting it wrong didn’t start in the first place.

While there was a lot of publicity about the changed guidelines in the US and UK there is very little public awareness in Australia because no organisation took responsibility for publicising the change, she says.

The changes have made CPR simple.

All that is required now is to place two hands on the big bone right between the nipples and using the heel of the hand push hard and fast, 100 compressions a minute.

‘You must keep doing it until someone comes, don’t stop,” says Ms Davies.

The movement artificially keeps blood pumping to the brain and improves the chance of the patients surviving functionally intact, she says.

“We used to do the breathing because it sounded biologically plausible because there was no air going in and going out but it appears that was far less important than we assumed,” she says.

Two recent US studies in showed just as many people survived when compressions alone were administered.

Vital ... emergency workers say everybody should know how to rescitate

Vital … emergency workers say everybody should know how to rescitateSource:ThinkStock

The chain of survival

1. Early recognition

• Recognise that the person has collapsed unconscious & is not breathing (the definition of SCA)

2. Early call for help

• Activate emergency services

• Yell loudly for help around you, i.e. to locate the nearest automated external defibrillator (AED), and help doing CPR

3. Early CPR

• Start chest compressions — hands-only CPR — don’t have to do mouth-to mouth any more

• Push hard and fast in the centre of the chest (between the two nipples)

• 100-120 compressions per minute (to beat of Stayin’ Alive by Bee Gees), uninterrupted, until a defibrillator is attached and ready to use it

• Good CPR pushes the blood around the body and to the brain and prevents it dying

4. Rapid defibrillation

• The AED is a small device (weighs not much more than a 2 litre bottle of milk), is fully portable & is easy to operate (provides simple verbal step-by-step instructions to follow).

• It won’t shock someone unless they are in cardiac arrest

• Attach AED pads to chest & the machine will tell you exactly what to do

• Push the big button to shock heart to restart it, then continue CPR immediately

5. Effective advanced life support (the part done by paramedics)

6. Integrated post-cardiac arrest care (the part done by hospitals)