Posts Tagged ‘Sydney’

Discounted First Aid and Cheap CPR – Book online!

January 18th, 2018

Discounted, Local (Northern Beaches, Sydney), accredited and relevant Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Childcare First Aid and Provide CPR training courses. Our certificates are produced under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and valid in every industry across Sydney and Australia. Simple Instruction has been providing training courses for Northern Beaches locals for the last 7 years at the Dee Why RSL and previously at the Brookvale Hotel. We have only ever cancelled 2 courses in 7 years and it is an honour to keep the Northern Beaches a happy and safe place. Simple Instruction also provides private courses – mainly to child care providers HLTAID004 and the Fitness Industry HLTAID001 CPR refreshers. We also catered towards building/construction, schools, air conditioning tradies and tailor our courses specifically to your needs.

Book now online with Simple Instruction www.simpleinstruction.com.au OR www.northshorefirstaid.com.au

Manly

2018 First Aid and CPR courses – Northern Beaches, Sydney

January 4th, 2018

Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training courses are back for January and February 2018. With a new year we think its time that we try and get everyone trained in the basics of first aid or CPR. Simple Instruction is a local Northern Beaches, Sydney First Aid provider for all workplaces, industries and safety requirements. Course are available at the Dee Why RSL and caters for people in suburbs across the Manly Warringah region.

Listed below are the 5 top reasons why first aid or CPR training is so important.

• Increases safety: The basis of first aid or CPR training is “prevention”. It is always better to be safe than to be sorry. Knowledge of first aid or CPR promotes the sense of safety and well being amongst people, prompting them to be more alert and safe in the surroundings they dwell in. Awareness and desire to be accident free keeps you more safe and secure, reducing the number of causalities and accidents.

• Helps save lives: If a person who is trained to give first aid administration happens to see any casualty in his vicinity, immediate action can be taken and lives be saved. While it is natural for most of us to rush to support any injured person, a trained person is more reliable, confident and in control of himself and his actions while in trauma situations.

• Helps relieve pain: Some injuries require a very simple solution like applying ice pack or a quick rub. A ride to the emergency room is not necessary, at least not for some time. In such cases, calling a person trained in first aid courses is more reliable. They can help reduce the pain by performing simple procedures and can help relieve pain at least temporarily.

• Makes people more secure: Knowing that you can save your own life when required, or that of the people you know or those in trauma during some emergency helps you relax more and be more secure. The sense of security promotes a healthy and a more confident environment around you where you and the people around you would feel more secure. The presence of such people provides reassurance to the others in the situation.

• Prevents the situation from becoming worse: A trained person would know how to keep the situation from becoming bad to worse. They will provide temporary treatment which will keep the condition of the victim from deteriorating, till professional help arrives. Something is better than nothing!

Knowledge of first aid and CPR training promotes a healthy, secure and a safer environment, and instills confidence amongst people, their families, their colleagues and associates thus making the Northern Beaches, Sydney a safer place. Basic first aid or CPR knowledge is very helpful in dealing with trauma situations. Not just the medical help they provide, but the confidence they exhibit is very helpful during casualties. Being trained to provide first aid is useful to oneself and society.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

January First Aid and CPR Courses

January 3rd, 2018

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR accredited training course are continuing throughout January and February 2018 with Simple Instruction conducting courses out of the Dee Why RSL. The courses are filling fast as participants are coming to the Northern Beaches from all over Sydney.

We cater to not only locals on the Northern Beaches from Palm Beach and Newport to Manly, Dee Why and Belrose but to all of Sydney with people coming form the CBD, North Shore, Chatswood, Bondi and the Central Coast. With First aid and CPR courses essential for most jobs and careers its essential we cater for individuals as they make their New Years resolutions which include Career changes.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au
All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

Free Online First Aid Courses (Unaccredited)

December 19th, 2017

While sitting here in a Los Angeles coffee shop, I thought why not have a look at the types of first aid training courses are on offer in this massive and highly densely popualted city. I stumbled across the following website http://www.firstaidforfree.com  and thought why can’t we offer something similar in Australia. Course like this are not available in Sydney, Australia and must be accredited to get the complete training.

However, if we can provide training for free and information is spread far and wide isn’t that a good thing??? Well I thought about what we offer at Simple Instruction through the Allen’s Training family and we actually do this for our clients for their basic knowledge test as a pre course refresher. It you want an unaccredited pre course online First Aid course please log on to https://enrol.allenstraining.com.au – if you would like to complete your fully accredited Provide First Aid (HLTAID003) or Provide CPR (HLTAID001) course then you will need to sit a practical component at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney, Australia.

Full payment and booking is required – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

HLTAID004

 

Provide CPR instructions on a Rash Vest. Saving lives on the Northern Beaches!

November 28th, 2017
Nothing beats a first aid or CPR course but this goes a long way to helping save kids. Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Get accredited with a HLTAID001 Provide CPR certificate, HLTAID002, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID004 training course.

The Rescue Rashie, printed with CPR instructions, aims to educate parents on resuscitation

MORE than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing, so action is being taken.

Emma Blake
News Corp Australia NetworkNOVEMBER 25, 20179:17PM

 

Westpac Rescue Rashie

THERE are no more excuses.

More than half of Australian parents say they wouldn’t know how to resuscitate their child if they stopped breathing so Westpac is taking action.

Drowning deaths peaked at 49 nationally last year, so the time is right for the Rescue Rashie, a children’s rash vest printed with step-by-step instructions for how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Almost 56 per cent of parents with kids aged between two and eight said they wouldn’t know how to do CPR in the event of an emergency, a survey has found, despite children under four accounting for 42 per cent of non-fatal drownings.

Developed with the help of paediatric first aid training and awareness organisation CPR Kids, the bright red rash vests provide thorough instructions for how to save a child’s life.

They are also a constant reminder to parents about water safety, said CPR kids founder Sarah Hunstead.

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy Piper

Ky Hurst with Chloe Meredith, Jack Otter, Mitchell Meredith and Taylor Otter promoting swimming safety. Photo Jeremy PiperSource:News Corp Australia

“Adults are nervous about what to do (in the event of a child losing consciousness) but the Rescue Rashie puts the instructions right on their child’s chest,” Ms Hunstead said.

“Not only will it give parents more confidence to go straight into CPR but when they are ding the washing or folding it up and putting it away it’s reminding them about the steps for CPR.”

Two thirds of parents did not know the correct compression to breath ratio (30 to 2) for CPR, the survey of 1000 parents also found.

Hunstead said it is important to call an ambulance but, especially in a drowning accident, you cannot wait for help.

“While you wait for the ambulance oxygen is not circulating so you need to give breaths and you’ve got to push hard and fast on their chest as soon as possible,” she said.

Ironman and Olympic swimmer Ky Hurst said water safety is number one when it comes to his kids.

“As much as I love the water and have spent my life around it I know that accidents can happen,” he said.

“The instructions on the front (of the rashie) and the bright red colour serve as a constant reminder of how to keep your children safe.”

Hurst competed in the Men's 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News Corp

Hurst competed in the Men’s 10km swimming at the London Olympics. Picture: News CorpSource:News Limited

Drowning deaths in children under five jumped by 32 per cent nationally in 2016/17.

Almost 300 people drowned in the 12 months to June 30 — almost 20 per cent of those in December, according to the Royal Lifesaving Society.

While many of our beaches are patrolled with qualified Lifesavers, almost as many people drown in swimming pools (44) as at the beach (50) so it is up to parents to know what to do in the event of an accident.

Westpac, which has sponsored the Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service for 44 years, wanted to take the next step in their commitment to water safety and educate parents about water safety, said Jessica Power, Westpac State General Manager NSW.

The UPF 50+ vests are being sold for $35 with proceeds going to Take Heart Australia to fund CPR training.

Pure Profile conducted the nationwide survey of 1,000 Australian parents who have children between the ages of two and eight years old.

BIG Freeze – Northern Beaches Ticks

November 21st, 2017

Simple Instruction loves promoting a great product and wants all Northern Beaches people to know about the recommended way to use First Aid and remove ticks. Please remember that child care workers HLTAID004 are not able to remove ticks or splinter in child care centres.

Scientist and gardener invents product to snap freeze ticks
Julie Cross, Manly Daily
November 19, 2017 12:30am
New research backs ‘freeze, don’t squeeze’
Mum almost dies after eating meat pie
A WOMAN who has suffered multiple tick bites while visiting the northern beaches believes she has invented a product which can freeze and kill them safely.

Peggy Douglass, 61, said her experience with ticks drove her to create a product to deal with the potentially life-threatening parasite.

Having trained in microbiology and chemistry, working for the Australian National University and then in food regulation bodies in the Commonwealth Government, she devised a pocket-sized solution, called Tick Tox.

It’s a simple aerosol can the size of a small deodorant tube. With one squirt it can snap freeze the tick.

Peggy Douglass has found herself covered in ticks after visits to family living on the northern beaches. Now she has produced a product called Tick Tox to kill them. Picture: Adam Yip
“In the old days I used to just pull them out,” Ms Douglass said.

“Sometimes I’d have 20 or more after working in my aunt’s garden in Palm Beach.

“Once I went home with 43.

“But having heard the advice that we should ‘freeze it, not squeeze it’, I looked around but found nothing that was specifically for ticks.”

At the moment tick experts advise people to use a freezing agent from the chemist.

The only ones available are for other conditions such as warts or tags.

Ms Douglass, who lives in Canberra, said hers is essentially the same product as those, but the applicator is smaller and more precise.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital, recently revealed results from a study looking at the best way to remove a tick.

He said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

Dr Andy Ratchford at Mona Vale Hospital Emergency department. Picture: Adam Yip
He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Prof van Nunen said she could not comment on the product Tick Tox, but would be looking at it with other members of Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness, TIARA, at their next meeting.

Tick Tox is currently on sale online at ticktox.com.au or from chemists in Avalon and Mona Vale.

Peggy Douglass with her product Tick Tox. Picture: Adam Yip.
HOW TO REMOVE A TICK
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off.

If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Book in for a Simple Instruction First Aid or CPR course for November, December, and January 2018. We have Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 at the Dee Why RSL. Book online

Applying First Aid Care – HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001

October 27th, 2017

Simple Instruction offers the best First Aid and CPR training courses on the Northern Beaches and Sydney. Applying your First Aid and CPR knowledge through real life and relevant scenarios. Please book into a public or private first aid or CPR Training course available at the Dee Why RSL.

Scratches, grazes, bumps, bruises, burns, cuts, bites … our skin cops a battering on an almost daily basis, yet most of the time we hardly think anything of it.

For many of us, wound treatment simply involves washing off the dirt or blood, sticking on a plaster, going about our business and leaving our skin to do the rest.

This is often fine; skin is generally pretty good at fixing itself. But sometimes wounds can linger, stubbornly, for weeks, then months, and even years.

The truth is that while medicine has come a long way in the past few centuries, wound care has been left behind a bit, according to wound expert Allison Cowin, from the University of South Australia.

“We’ve been trying to treat wounds from the beginning of time and there have been many different types of things done to them with maggots and honey,” Professor Cowin said.

This is partly because the process of wound healing remains something of a medical mystery, involving many different cells and bodily processes that science is still trying to understand.

“So we just slap a dressing on it, slap a band-aid on, and really all we’re doing is trying to let the body heal itself,” Professor Cowin said.

When to get help

But often we neglect proper wound care. We leave wounds to fester in the hope they’ll eventually be OK, and we rarely seek medical attention even for a persistent wound.

This is an issue especially for the elderly, with Professor Cowin citing data suggesting as many as one in four people in residential aged care have a chronic, non-healing wound.

One of the big questions about wounds is when to seek medical help. Wound specialist Sue Templeton says there isn’t a hard and fast rule, but suggests that if a wound scares you, get a professional to take a look.

“If you look at that and go, ‘Oh my goodness’, then you should consider seeing a GP at the least,” says Ms Templeton, a nurse practitioner with the Royal District Nursing Service in South Australia.

Other red flags might be if the wound is still bleeding after 5 to 10 minutes, or if the laceration or puncture is so deep you can’t see the bottom of it.

With burns, the advice from St John’s NSW is to see a doctor if the burn is deep or if it’s larger than a 20 cent piece, if it involves the airway, face, hands or genitals, or if you’re unsure how severe the burn is.

Wound consultant Wendy White suggests the location and size of wounds are also key factors to consider.

“An abraded [or skinned] knee is very different to the same injury type but affecting, for example, half of your back,” she says.

“In fact, that’s very similar to losing skin from a large burn — there’s going to be a lot more fluid to deal with, and pain and discomfort, and larger wounds take longer to heal and increase the risk of infection.”

Just won’t heal

Another major warning sign that things aren’t going as they should be, is how long a wound has been lingering.

The first four weeks after an injury are what Ms White calls ‘the Golden Four Weeks’, during which the body should proceed through the normal process of healing.

If a wound hasn’t healed or improved by the end of that period, then there is an increased risk of chronic wound developing.

“There’s a transition period after these initial weeks where, by six weeks, if the wound remains open it becomes a different animal,” Ms White says.

“It becomes a bit trapped; the three words they use in the literature is ‘stagnant’, ‘stunned’ and ‘stalled,’ which interrupts the normal process of wound healing”.

Living with delayed healing, chronic wounds can have many consequences, none of them good.

People often isolate themselves when they have very bad wounds. So this increases their chances of depression, anxiety and stress, which in turn negatively impacts on their immune system, general health and their sense of wellbeing.

By that stage, a chronic wound needs medical help to address not only the wound, but also to explore why it’s not healing in the first place.

Clean and protected

But that is worst-case scenario.

For relatively simple wounds — like a cut earned while chopping tomatoes, a grazed knee from a tumble, or a scrape — the aim is to keep it clean and protected, Ms Templeton said.

Covering it with a sticking plaster, or similar, can help keep a wound clean and protect it from more damage in the first few days; but beware, these get soggy when exposed to water.

If there’s likely to be a lot of dirt in the wound, such as might happen with a graze, it’s best to carefully clean it out before covering.

There are also modern topical antiseptic cleansing and dressing products, which should be used for contaminated wounds to reduce the risk of infection, Ms White said.

But she warns against routine and widespread use of topical antibiotics.

“We know now that the microorganisms in the wound can become resistant very quickly to topical antibiotics,” she said.

Honey and saltwater

As for medicinal honey, Ms Templeton says, this could help for minor wounds. A number of studies have found it can be an effective wound dressing.

But she stresses that you need to buy the right type of honey, because regular store-bought honey could do more harm than good.

“Certainly with the designated proprietary wound honeys, each batch of honey is individually tested to ensure it meets a minimum antiseptic standard, which you might not get from a supermarket brand,” she said.

One common misconception about wound care is that salt water baths or seawater are good for healing.

Ms Templeton said someone with a major wound should actually avoid submersing it in seawater, because there’s a risk of contamination that could make things worse.

“There are a couple of specific bacteria that live in the ocean and certainly they can get into wounds from time to time and cause very nasty infections,” she said, stressing this is most relevant to people with large wounds like ulcers.

She also warns against salt baths, pointing out that this can expose the wound to bacteria from other parts of the body, which increases the risk of contamination.

Biggest misconception

But the biggest misconception about wounds is that all wounds heal.

She says if a wound isn’t improving in the first few weeks after an injury, in the sense of getting smaller, not hurting as much, not seeping as much, not as red or inflamed, then that should be a trigger to get medical help.

“The longer you leave it, you’re going to start to have a problem wound that doesn’t quite know what do to with itself, and the long-term consequences are that once a wound fails to heal in those first 30 days, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person that’s living with it.”

 

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid and CPR (includes Asthma and Anaphylaxis)

October 23rd, 2017

The Northern Beaches of Sydney’s number 1 course provider for HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training courses under ACECQA standards. Simple Instruction prides its on delivering fast, efficient, online and cost effective First Aid courses.

Simple Instruction has reduced its childcare first aid HLTAID004 costs to $130 per person and have courses being conducted at the Dee Why RSL on a weekly basis.

Simple Instruction will also come to your Childcare, workplace, or home and deliver courses at a time that suits you.

Being the best first aid course in Sydney we have also reduced our prices in the Provide First Aid Course to $100 per person and our Provide CPR HLTAID001 (Formerly Apply First Aid) training course to $55 per person. With the reduction in price we have seen and increase in numbers at the course so please book today. Belrose

Allen’s Training is our co-provider and we deliver courses under the banner of their RTO 90909.

Book today – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Looking for a white card course – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

NSW ONLINE WHITECARD – Parramatta, Blacktown, Cronulla, Bondi, Cabramatta, Manly, Penrith, Macquarie Park, Camden, Liverpool

September 26th, 2017

NSW White Card provider www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au provides licences 4 work sites and the construction industry for $29. Our online white card training has advanced WHS and OHS courses throughout Sydney NSW.

You could be in Parramatta, Blacktown, Cronulla, Bondi, Cabramatta, Chatswood, Brookvale, Dee Why, Manly, Liverpool, Penrith, Macquarie Park, Camden or any other part of Sydney and get accredited whilst in the comfort of you own home. Online White Card Australia is the leading training course provider in the country. Using RTO 90909 Allen’s Training we have advanced technology to make your experience easy.

The simple, cheap $29, easy, online and best white card service has provided over 1000 white cards in 3 years. Online White Card Australia is the leader in white card industry.

Simple Instruction provides first aid and CPR training courses for the Northern Beaches and North Shore community.

Warringah Rats! First Title in 12 Years.

August 26th, 2017

First Title for the Warringah Rats in 12 Years! The RATS were playing for Lachlan Ward who passed away during a match earlier this season.

This is a great news story for the Rats and the Northern Beaches community. Overcoming adversity and turning the tragic events of Lachlan’s passing into a memorable season for all. Well done to all the Northern beaches community who showed up at North Sydney Oval to support the rats. Well done also to Luke Holmes a local Narrabeen Sports High School student and the heart of the Rats who played his 200th game for the Rats.

Remember to stay safe in all situations and be trained in first aid and CPR at our public courses held at the Dee Why RSL.

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