Posts Tagged ‘CPR’

Northern Beaches Council Lifeguard Dee Why Beach

July 11th, 2017

A MAN has returned to Dee Why Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney to thank the people who provided first aid spinal techniques after a terrifying ordeal in which he floated paralysed while struggling for air between waves.

Pooyan Shargh, 32, paid tribute to council lifeguards Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer, without whom he probably would have died.

“Thankfully, these gentlemen came and helped, and the first thing I said was, ‘I’m dying, I’m dying’,” Mr Shargh said.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by Scott Mortimer and Sean Woolnough. Picture: Phil Rogers.

Mr Shargh, 32, went bodyboarding but, on his first wave, went headfirst into the sand, suffering excruciating pain.

“Next thing I noticed, I was paralysed,” he said.

“I was underwater — I couldn’t even feel my legs. I knew straight away something had happened to my neck. I was struggling to breathe, struggling to stay afloat. I thought then. I’m not going to make it.

“Somehow, I managed to get on my back. I was just floating — I was drinking in a lot of water with every wave.”

Shockingly, he said people swam right past him and observed him floating on his back but did not stop to check if he was OK.

Mr Woolnough, 38, was the first to respond to the incident, on May 21.

He was in the lifeguard kiosk with Mr Mortimer when they noticed Mr Shargh floating on his back less than 10m offshore.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach. Picture: Phil Rogers

“We were watching him. We didn’t actually see anything happen and he was on his back, with his arms by his side — he drifted in towards a rip and someone even walked past him and just looked down,” Mr Woolnough said.

Mr Woolnough said he noticed Mr Shargh’s facial expressions were odd as he approached him on a paddleboard.

“Straight away I knew that it was a spinal problem,” he said

“I could stand so I actually got rid of my board and just floated him, because I didn’t want to move him that much.”

Pooyan Shargh with Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer.

Mr Mortimer, 47, and two off-duty lifeguards assisted in the water with a spinal board to stop Mr Shargh moving too much.

Mr Shargh was even handed back his bodyboard from lifeguards who retrieved it as part of the service.

“If it wasn’t for you guys, I never would have seen my family again,” Mr Shargh said.

“I just want to say how proud we are to have you guys around, watching over us and saving lives.”

Iran-born Mr Shargh, who moved to Dee Why five years ago, urged others to learn from his experience and not go into the surf alone.

“My mistake was going alone, especially me, or anyone that is foreign and probably less experienced than some locals, you definitely have to go with a partner and you have to try to swim within the flags, that is so important,” he said.

Northern Beaches Council aquatic services executive manager Peter Livanes said efficiencies created from the merger of the three former councils — Manly, Warringah and Pittwater — meant it could keep lifeguards on patrol longer.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach after he was found face down. Picture: Phil Rogers.

“Lifeguard presence meant our team were able to respond immediately and provide the highest level of care,” Mr Livanes said.

Mr Mortimer said that changes in shifts meant they were stationed at Dee Why during winter this season.

“This time of year, normally lifeguards are gone but we are staying longer now, just because it has been busier, winter is getting warmer.

“We are here on the weekends — two years ago we wouldn’t have been here,” Mr Mortimer said.

“The old mentality was we used to just watch the flags but now it is different — it is a whole-beach approach. We watch everything.

“You’ve got the playgrounds, surfers, bodyboarders, rock fishermen, not just the swimmers.”

Mr Livanes said the council’s professional lifeguard service conducted more than 220,000 preventive actions during the 2016/17 season.

“I’m extremely proud of the professionalism and work ethic of our team to keep the community safe,” he said. “The northern beaches has some of the best beaches in the world and our team strives to provide the highest level of beach safety to match.”

Simple Instruction provides Spinal training as part of our first aid and CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Originally published: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/bodyboarder-returns-to-thank-hero-lifeguards-after-crashing-headfirst-into-sand-at-dee-why-beach/news-story/97a3195d36e65ee22079d7d8e42fc46d

Dee Why, Northern Beaches, Sydney – HLTAID004 Training Course

July 10th, 2017

Dee Why RSL is centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Simple Instruction is conducting public First Aid and CPR courses every 5 days during the month of July and August. Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 course is for anyone in the childcare industry and covers the asthma and anaphylaxis components as well as the first aid and CPR components.

The HLTAID004 course has been price reduced for this financial year as we have seen an increase in childcare professionals taking up the opportunity. Our Registered Training Organisation RTO Allen’s Training has also reduced their costs to Simple Instruction and we have passed this onto our TAFE and child care Certificate 3 graduates.

We look forward to all child care centres taking up the opportunity to be trained by Simple Instruction in the HLTAID004 and look forward to continuing to support the Northern Beaches community. Simple Instruction also comes to your child care centre or pre school at a time that suits you.

 

Northern Beaches Defibrillator Access

July 6th, 2017

Northern Beaches defibrillator roll out – well done Duncan Kerr! With this great initiative we need to make sure the Northern Beaches community is trained in CPR and defibrillator use. Please book into a HLTAID001 Provide CPR training course at the Dee Why RSL

Original Article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/public-access-defibrillators-to-be-installed-in-hightraffic-areas-on-the-northern-beaches/news-story/d6a0fdc81ee672a5f7e55349dbba2c84

Public access defibrillators to be installed in high-traffic areas on the northern beaches
Robbie Patterson, Manly Daily
July 5, 2017 12:00am

PUBLICLY accessible defibrillators would be rolled out across high-priority areas of the northern beaches as part of a campaign to improve survival chances of heart attack victims.

Frenchs Forest resident Duncan Kerr, a paramedic of 10 years, has urged Northern Beaches Council to explore the possibility of putting 24-hour public-access defibrillators in high-traffic areas.

He highlighted areas such as The Corso at Manly, Warringah Mall and high-use sporting fields as key spots.

Mr Kerr said defibrillators were often hard to access as they are usually locked away inside sport clubs.

A public access defibrillator could be installed in Manly Corso. Picture: David Swift.
“These are public-access defibrillators, which means anyone can use, ” he said.

The former Warringah councillor and member of the Cardiac Arrest Survival Foundation, pointed to the peninsula’s only device of that calibre, which has been installed at Cromer Park.

“It is a big deal, especially at night or if you are just out walking the dog and no one else is around and something happens,” he said.

“They are always accessible and always monitored, which means when you pull the defibrillator out a triple-0 call is made.”

At last week’s Northern Beaches Council meeting, infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor agreed to look into the proposal.

Northern Beaches Council infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor. Picture: Troy Snook.
“If you save one life, it is well and truly worth supporting such a proposal,” he said. “My recommendation would be that council support sporting clubs in terms of the rollout of portable defibrillators but also look at high-priority sites across the local government area (for the public-access models).”

He said the council would “see if external funding from the Office of Sport and Recreation was available”, but would also look at the council’s budget.

Mr Kerr, who plans to run for the Northern Beaches Council, said he would be pushing this as a major policy issue ahead of the September 9 election.

What’s On? Northern Beaches Council Events – School holidays

June 30th, 2017

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 training courses provided by Simple Instruction are on some of the things happening in the July School Holidays.

All public courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) and is centrally located to cater for all suburbs from Brookvale to Avalon, Manly to Belrose and Freshwater to Mona Vale. All courses are accredited through Allen’s Training.

Simple Instruction is a proud Northern Beaches, Sydney business and want to ensure we have a safe community. Please ensure you are safe these school holidays and get trained in First Aid or CPR. Private courses are available!

If you are looking for things to do it might be wise to have a ‘staycation’ and look at the Northern Beaches Council link listed below.

http://thingstodo.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/whats-on/event-calendar

First Aid Northern Beaches – Dee Why RSL Training Course

May 4th, 2017

First aid for Northern Beaches locals is a vital skill. Having the skills to able to save someones life is something you will never forget. Northern Beaches and Simple Instructions first aid courses are designed to help you feel ready to deal with an emergency situation. We don’t bore you with a long day of dull power point presentations we make sure that you are moving and practicing the first aid skills.

As a first responder — and as any of my professional paramedic friends will say — there’s nothing worse than attending a drowning incident involving a child and finding people standing around panicking and unsure of what to do.

With the prevalence of backyard pools in Australia and our love of the water, it’s an all too common scenario. To know that there was a chance to save that child’s life if only someone had even attempted CPR is just awful.

People panic — we get that — but first responders are human too and any incident involving a child really hits you emotionally.

Even rudimentary first aid skills could make all the difference in a drowning situation. Especially involving kids. Because with quick intervention — a drowning child has got a better chance of making it than adults do.

Statistics show that injuries and accidents are the leading cause of death in children aged 1-14 — and boys make up two thirds of that number.

Yet 40 percent of parents say they wouldn’t be confident in knowing what to do if their child — or another child or adult — were drowning and 25 percent say they wouldn’t be confident in administering CPR to a child.

I’m a parent to two kids myself and I can’t imagine any worse feeling in an emergency situation involving a child, than looking back and thinking “I wish I’d known what to do or I wish I’d done that first aid course I kept saying I’d do”.

A fairly minor accident I witnessed has always stayed with me. I saw a boy running around the edge of a swimming pool — in what seemed like slow motion, he slipped and bashed his face resulting in quite a nasty cut in his mouth.

Those kind of injuries tend to bleed a lot but aren’t necessarily serious. What really struck me was that his mum had no idea what to do and she went into shock herself because of the panic. She was screaming and crying and it was actually making her son worse.

Of course, it’s understandable. No parent can stand to see their child hurt or in pain, but if the Mum had a bit of an idea what to do she would’ve felt so much better because she had the skills to help her son.

Everyone’s busy, but in the critical moment where even a bit of first aid knowledge could save a life, I think most parents would rather be able to say they’d done all they could to prepare.

The stats say that around 50 percent of parents say they don’t have any first aid knowledge at all or wouldn’t know how to treat certain injuries.

The most common injury incidents involving kids under 15 — after car accidents — would be sporting related or falls especially from trampolines or bikes, scooters or skateboards. These often result in concussions, sprains and fractures.

Most people know what to do to stem bleeding, but I’ve lost count of the times I’ve seen a big icepack dumped on top of a break or fracture which can actually cause more pain and damage because of the pressure.

People see swelling and immediately think ice but it’s not always the right thing to do. Just even knowing a bit about assessing injuries is helpful.

Other injuries or issues we’d most commonly see affecting kids are usually to do with burns, poisoning, choking, asthma or anaphylaxis attacks.I think having a broad range of first aid skills particularly those that cover off issues most likely to affect kids is a good place to start but even only knowing something about CPR is useful.

St John Ambulance WA offers a specific nationally accredited CPR course where you can come in for half a day and train in the recovery position and basic CPR. We also run Caring For Kids courses during school hours which covers all the major first aid components, including CPR, then if you want, you can go into more advanced training too.

First aid knowledge can go such a long way in making a bad situation less awful. I think of having first aid skills, especially as a parent, as like a type of insurance on your child.

Of course they’ll help if the worst happens — and hopefully you’ll never need them — but the peace of mind is priceless too.

Northern Beaches Hospital

March 8th, 2017

Simple Instruction has been interested in how the Northern Beaches Hospital Project has been progressing over the last year. Residents in Forestville, Belrose, Davidson and Frenchs Forest have been feeling the affects of the project during the building stages but I believe that this will be a great outcome for the Northern Beaches and everyone across Sydney. The Northern Beaches Council NBC is trying to limit the impact on residents throughout all stages and we need to focus on the overall outcome of state of the art facilities to keep the Northern Beaches safe.

Please make a booking with Simple Instruction for all your first aid and CPR requirements that are held at the Dee Why RSL.

http://www.warringah.nsw.gov.au/your-council/current-works-and-projects/northern-beaches-hospital-project

The NSW Government is building a new hospital at Frenchs Forest with an estimated completion date of 2018.

Northern Beaches Hospital is being built on a 6.5 hectare site at Frenchs Forest, bound by Frenchs Forest Road West, Warringah Road, Wakehurst Parkway and The Forest High School. This is known as the Northern Beaches Hospital project.

Precinct Planning

Council is preparing the Northern Beaches Hospital Precinct Structure Plan. The purpose of the Plan is to look at the wider land use implications of the proposed new hospital. It will involve a detailed analysis of opportunities and constraints, to properly plan for future development around the new hospital.

Council has engaged consultants to undertake this important planning task. It’s hoped the first draft will be avilable for public comment in early 2016.

Northern Beaches Hospital

Northern Beaches Hospital is the first major investment in public health infrastructure on the northern beaches for decades, and a long-held ambition for the local community.

A new hospital for the northern beaches community will provide more health services and complex care at contemporary standards, with modern infrastructure that supports innovation, research, teaching and clinical changes well into the future.

When the doors open in 2018, the new facility will deliver level 5 hospital services to the local community; with 488 beds, a large emergency department, theatres and a GP clinic on site.

For the first time, the northern beaches community won’t have to travel outside the area to receive complex healthcare treatments.

northernbeacheshospital.com.au

[email protected]

0427 088 526

North Shore First Aid Course – Provide First Aid and Provide CPR

January 11th, 2017

Simple Instruction is based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney at the Dee Why RSL but prides itself on catering for all of Sydney. The North Shore is the Northern Beaches close neighbour and we are seeing people coming to our First Aid and CPR training courses from Mosman, Cammeray, Naremburn, Willoughby, Crows Nest, North Sydney, Neutral Bay, Cremorne and Chatswood. In fact a lot of people would rather travel and park at the Dee Why RSL than battle traffic to get into Sydney’s CBD.

Simple Instruction has been catering for the Northern Beaches and North Shore for the past 7 years and we support local business and initiatives. We pride ourselves on customer service and cater to your needs from start to finish.

Simple Instruction already caters for many childcare centers and gyms by providing private courses and we have great feedback from all staff and personal trainers with many returning for their renewals.

Make a payment to book a course online via our website.

Dehydration – know the facts. First Aid and CPR courses available.

January 10th, 2017

This urine colour chart will give you an idea of whether a person is drinking enough or is dehydrated (lost too much water from the body). Dark yellow urine - very dehydrated; drink a large bottle of water immediately. Bright yellow urine - dehydrated; drink 2-3 glasses of water now. Light yellow urine - somewhat dehydrated; drink a large glass of water now. Almost clear urine - hydrated - you are drinking enough; keep drinking at the same rate. Be Aware! If you are taking single vitamin supplements or a multivitamin supplement, some of the vitamins in the supplements can change the colour of the urine for a few hours, making it bright yellow or discoloured.

Simple Instruction is making sure you are safe over the next few days. Prevention is always better than cure – lets try stay hydrated and avoid a first aid situation in the first place. Simple Instruction is offering first aid and CPR training courses on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. Located at the DYRSL (Dee Why RSL) we cater for all suburbs including Manly, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Warriewood, Freshwater, Belrose, Bilgola, Avalon and many more. All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909, book first aid courses online through the website.

First Aid Care for treating Sunburn – Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR

January 9th, 2017

We know, you didn’t mean to get sunburned. You lost track of time, or nodded off, and now you can tell you’re going to be lobster-red and miserable. It can take several hours for the full damage to show itself. So at the first sign, get out of the sun and follow this expert advice from dermatologist Jeffrey Brackeen, MD, a member of The Skin Cancer Foundation.

Nobody’s perfect, and a sunburn can happen. But it’s important to take it seriously and stop it from happening again. Your risk for melanoma doubles if you’ve had more than five sunburns.

1. Act Fast to Cool It Down

If you’re near a cold pool, lake or ocean, take a quick dip to cool your skin, but only for a few seconds so you don’t prolong your exposure. Then cover up and get out of the sun immediately. Continue to cool the burn with cold compresses. You can use ice to make ice water for a cold compress, but don’t apply ice directly to the sunburn. Or take a cool shower or bath, but not for too long, which can be drying, and avoid harsh soap, which might irritate the skin even more.

2. Moisturize While Skin Is Damp

While skin is still damp, use a gentle moisturizing lotion (but not petroleum or oil-based ointments, which may trap the heat and make the burn worse). Repeat to keep burned or peeling skin moist over the next few days.

3. Decrease the Inflammation

At the first sign of sunburn, taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), such as ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin, can help with discomfort and inflammation, says Dr. Brackeen, who practices at the Skin Cancer Institute in Lubbock, Texas. You can continue with the NSAIDs as directed till the burn feels better. You can also use a 1 percent over-the-counter cortisone cream as directed for a few days to help calm redness and swelling. Aloe vera may also soothe mild burns and is generally considered safe. Wear loose, soft, breathable clothing to avoid further skin irritation, and stay out of the sun.

4. Replenish Your Fluids

Burns draw fluid to the skin’s surface and away from the rest of the body, so you may become dehydrated, explains Dr. Brackeen. It’s important to rehydrate by drinking extra liquids, including water and sports drinks that help to replenish electrolytes, immediately and while your skin heals.

5. See a Doctor If …

You should seek medical help if you or a child has severe blistering over a large portion of the body, has a fever and chills, or is woozy or confused. Don’t scratch or pop blisters, which can lead to infection. Signs of infection include red streaks or oozing pus.

Bottom line: Your skin will heal, but real damage has been done. “Repeat sunburns put you at a substantial risk for skin cancer and premature skin aging, and I want people to ‘learn from the burn,’” Dr. Brackeen says. Review the guidelines in The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Prevention Handbook. Remember how bad this sunburn felt, then commit to protecting yourself from the sun every day, all year long.

Sunburn and other relevant first aid treatments are taught in Simple Instruction courses. Simple Instruction is located locally on the Northern Beaches of Sydney and is based at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL). We cater for everyone from beginners to experts and have people coming across the Manly, Warringah and Pittwater regions. If you are looking for a private course we can come to you and have visited suburbs from Avalon, Balgowlah, Mosman, Freshwater, Brookvale, Manly, Belrose, Narrabeen, Mona Vale, Warriwood, Frenchs Forest, Chatswood and many more. Please make a booking for a Provide First Aid HLTAID003 course, Provide CPR HLTAID001 course or Childcare HLTAID004 course online via the website.

 

Northern Beaches and Sydney CBD Safety – Provide First Aid HLTAID003 and Provide CPR HLTAID001 course

October 24th, 2016

LAURA SULLIVAN, CENtRAL
October 18, 2016 2:57pm

A DEADLY snake was seen slithering along George St, Sydney sending people into a panic.

Snake handler, Harley Jones from Snake’s in the City, was called to George St around 2.20pm with reports of a red-bellied black snake on the loose.

Mr Jones was contacted by police and two other witnesses to remove the snake from the busy area outside a hotel.

After taking the full grown red-bellied black snake to a Crows Nest vet, Mr Jones said the snake has a good chance of survival despite having blood on its head.

“The snake’s injury is as much of a mystery as why it was there in the first place,” he said.

“There was quite a lot of blood on the footpath, it could be a lung injury.”

Mr Jones said he was pleasantly surprised by the amount of people concerned for the snake’s welfare.

“People were more curious than scared, which is really fantastic to see,” he said.

The venue manager at the Morrison Bar said staff rushed to close the doors and call police as soon as they saw there was a snake out the front.

He said the snake appeared to be injured and distressed, with a large amount of blood on it’s head.
“The staff couldn’t believe what they were seeing and covered the snake up straight away,” the venue manager said.

“You don’t expect to see a massive deadly snake in the city while you are relaxing and having a drink.”

He said none of the patrons appeared to be injured or stressed by the situation.
A picture of a one-month old baby red-bellied black snake. Picture: Jono Searle
Mr Jones said finding a snake in the CBD was far from a regular thing for him.

“It is very unusual to find a red-bellied black snake in front of a hotel, in the middle of the city,” Mr Jones said.

The venom is poisonous and symptoms include bleeding and or swelling at the bite site, nausea, vomiting, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, sweating, local or general muscle pain and weakness, and red-brown urine.

Although there are a number of bites each year, very few human deaths have resulted and most deaths were in earlier times.

Often bite victims experience only mild or negligible symptoms but some end up in hospital.

But there is a greater risk for children and pets.

The snakes grow to an average size of 1.5 to 2m, with males growing slightly larger. But they can grow up to about 2.5m.

Yes folks its that time of year again. Snakes are coming out to look for food. Make sure you are ready in case a family member gets a snake bite, learn first aid in a nationally recognised first aid course on the Northern Beaches. We are the best first aid course in Sydney and we offer training with a defibrillator to all participants. Book now for a day you wont forget. Simple Instruction is centrally located at the Dee Why RSL DYRSL and caters Provide First Aid HLTAID003 and Provide CPR HLTAID001 courses for all Northern Beaches and North Shore locals from Avalon, Narrabeen, Mona Vale and Warriewood to Belrose, Frenchs Forest, Beacon Hill to Manly, Dee Why, Freshwater and Brookvale to Mosman, Cammeray and Neutral Bay.

All courses are conducted under www.allenstraining.com.au

White Card course www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

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