Posts Tagged ‘CPR’

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

CPR Performed on Collaroy Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney.

March 14th, 2018

A sad incident on the Northern Beaches where members of the public have performed CPR on a man who unfortunately has passed away. CPR is crucial life skill to learn and a massive congratulations should go to the people who got involved to help this man. Please remember that doing something is better than nothing when faced with a first aid situation. Follow the DRSABCD guidelines and you might be able to help a family member, friend or another member of the public.

Please get trained in CPR and first aid to help keep the Northern Beaches a safe place – it is a life saving skill that you may need one day.

Manly Daily, Manly Daily
February 20, 2018 6:07pm

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/man-dies-on-sydneys-northern-beaches/news-story/8d92e3880ab6e6b1d41b5dd61192b13e

A man has died at Collaroy Beach, on Sydney’s northern beaches, this afternoon.

Police said emergency services were called to Collaroy, just before 4.30pm, after a man was found unconscious in the water.

Members of the public commenced CPR on the man, aged in his 70s, before surf lifesavers arrived.

NSW Ambulance Paramedics and police attended, but he died at the scene.

Officers from Northern Beaches Police Area Command have commenced investigations into the incident.

Initial inquires suggest there are no suspicious circumstances.

All accredted training courses are held at the Dee Why RSL conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Northern Beaches First Aid – HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting

March 2nd, 2018

The Northern Beaches community should feel very safe with most child care centers meeting the National Quality standard. With the current figure at 77% and growing year on year, we must make sure our children and families feel safe and the staff have the appropriate training.

If you are a current child care educator or TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care student make sure you book into one of our HLTAID004 Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting training courses today. We are located at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney, and conduct courses on a regular basis. We offer a variety of training courses including HLTAID001 Provide CPR – $55, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – $110 and our tailor HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid training course which includes asthma and anaphylaxis training – $140. Don’t miss out on the cheapest price for first aid training on the Northern Beaches.

https://www.acecqa.gov.au/latest-news/more-three-quarters-education-and-care-services-rated-meeting-national-quality-standard

Thursday, 8 February 2018
ACECQA today announced that 94% of all children’s education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework (NQF) have received a quality rating, with 77% rated at ‘Meeting National Quality Standard’ (NQS) or above (as at 31 December 2017).

“In the last five years, the proportion of services rated at ‘Meeting NQS’ or above has risen from 59% to 65%, 69%, 72% and now 77%”, said ACECQA CEO Gabrielle Sinclair.

“Continuous quality improvement is one of the core objectives of the National Quality Framework. It is very pleasing to see this year-on-year improvement in service quality”, added Ms Sinclair.

Key findings from ACECQA’s NQF Snapshot include:

94% (14,687) of approved education and care services have a quality rating
77% (11,253) of rated services have an overall quality rating of ‘Meeting NQS’ or above
40% (1373) of services rated at ‘Working Towards NQS’ do not meet five or fewer of the 58 elements of quality
3776 quality rating reassessments have been completed
Of the 2700 reassessments of services rated ‘Working Towards NQS’, 68% (1827) resulted in a higher overall quality rating.
The findings are published in full on the ACECQA website: acecqa.gov.au/nqf/snapshots

On 1 February 2018, a revised version of the NQS came into effect, which reduced the number of standards from 18 to 15, and the number of elements from 58 to 40. All education and care services will be quality assessed and rated against the revised NQS from 1 February onwards.

Parents and carers are encouraged to visit Starting Blocks for more information about their local education and care services.

Education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework include long day care, outside school hours care and family day care services, as well as most preschools/kindergartens.

All course offered under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Free Online First Aid Courses (Unaccredited)

December 19th, 2017

While sitting here in a Los Angeles coffee shop, I thought why not have a look at the types of first aid training courses are on offer in this massive and highly densely popualted city. I stumbled across the following website http://www.firstaidforfree.com  and thought why can’t we offer something similar in Australia. Course like this are not available in Sydney, Australia and must be accredited to get the complete training.

However, if we can provide training for free and information is spread far and wide isn’t that a good thing??? Well I thought about what we offer at Simple Instruction through the Allen’s Training family and we actually do this for our clients for their basic knowledge test as a pre course refresher. It you want an unaccredited pre course online First Aid course please log on to https://enrol.allenstraining.com.au – if you would like to complete your fully accredited HLTAID003 Provide First Aid or HLTAID001 Provide CPR course then you will need to sit a practical component at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney, Australia.

Full payment and booking is required – www.simpleinstruction.com.au

HLTAID004

 

BIG Freeze – Northern Beaches Ticks

November 21st, 2017

Simple Instruction loves promoting a great product and wants all Northern Beaches people to know about the recommended way to use First Aid and remove ticks. Please remember that child care workers HLTAID004 are not able to remove ticks or splinter in child care centres.

Scientist and gardener invents product to snap freeze ticks
Julie Cross, Manly Daily
November 19, 2017 12:30am
New research backs ‘freeze, don’t squeeze’
Mum almost dies after eating meat pie
A WOMAN who has suffered multiple tick bites while visiting the northern beaches believes she has invented a product which can freeze and kill them safely.

Peggy Douglass, 61, said her experience with ticks drove her to create a product to deal with the potentially life-threatening parasite.

Having trained in microbiology and chemistry, working for the Australian National University and then in food regulation bodies in the Commonwealth Government, she devised a pocket-sized solution, called Tick Tox.

It’s a simple aerosol can the size of a small deodorant tube. With one squirt it can snap freeze the tick.

Peggy Douglass has found herself covered in ticks after visits to family living on the northern beaches. Now she has produced a product called Tick Tox to kill them. Picture: Adam Yip
“In the old days I used to just pull them out,” Ms Douglass said.

“Sometimes I’d have 20 or more after working in my aunt’s garden in Palm Beach.

“Once I went home with 43.

“But having heard the advice that we should ‘freeze it, not squeeze it’, I looked around but found nothing that was specifically for ticks.”

At the moment tick experts advise people to use a freezing agent from the chemist.

The only ones available are for other conditions such as warts or tags.

Ms Douglass, who lives in Canberra, said hers is essentially the same product as those, but the applicator is smaller and more precise.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital, recently revealed results from a study looking at the best way to remove a tick.

He said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

Dr Andy Ratchford at Mona Vale Hospital Emergency department. Picture: Adam Yip
He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Prof van Nunen said she could not comment on the product Tick Tox, but would be looking at it with other members of Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness, TIARA, at their next meeting.

Tick Tox is currently on sale online at ticktox.com.au or from chemists in Avalon and Mona Vale.

Peggy Douglass with her product Tick Tox. Picture: Adam Yip.
HOW TO REMOVE A TICK
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off.

If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Book in for a Simple Instruction First Aid or CPR course for November, December, and January 2018. We have Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 at the Dee Why RSL. Book online

Northern Beaches Council Lifeguard Dee Why Beach

July 11th, 2017

A MAN has returned to Dee Why Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney to thank the people who provided first aid spinal techniques after a terrifying ordeal in which he floated paralysed while struggling for air between waves.

Pooyan Shargh, 32, paid tribute to council lifeguards Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer, without whom he probably would have died.

“Thankfully, these gentlemen came and helped, and the first thing I said was, ‘I’m dying, I’m dying’,” Mr Shargh said.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by Scott Mortimer and Sean Woolnough. Picture: Phil Rogers.

Mr Shargh, 32, went bodyboarding but, on his first wave, went headfirst into the sand, suffering excruciating pain.

“Next thing I noticed, I was paralysed,” he said.

“I was underwater — I couldn’t even feel my legs. I knew straight away something had happened to my neck. I was struggling to breathe, struggling to stay afloat. I thought then. I’m not going to make it.

“Somehow, I managed to get on my back. I was just floating — I was drinking in a lot of water with every wave.”

Shockingly, he said people swam right past him and observed him floating on his back but did not stop to check if he was OK.

Mr Woolnough, 38, was the first to respond to the incident, on May 21.

He was in the lifeguard kiosk with Mr Mortimer when they noticed Mr Shargh floating on his back less than 10m offshore.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach. Picture: Phil Rogers

“We were watching him. We didn’t actually see anything happen and he was on his back, with his arms by his side — he drifted in towards a rip and someone even walked past him and just looked down,” Mr Woolnough said.

Mr Woolnough said he noticed Mr Shargh’s facial expressions were odd as he approached him on a paddleboard.

“Straight away I knew that it was a spinal problem,” he said

“I could stand so I actually got rid of my board and just floated him, because I didn’t want to move him that much.”

Pooyan Shargh with Sean Woolnough and Scott Mortimer.

Mr Mortimer, 47, and two off-duty lifeguards assisted in the water with a spinal board to stop Mr Shargh moving too much.

Mr Shargh was even handed back his bodyboard from lifeguards who retrieved it as part of the service.

“If it wasn’t for you guys, I never would have seen my family again,” Mr Shargh said.

“I just want to say how proud we are to have you guys around, watching over us and saving lives.”

Iran-born Mr Shargh, who moved to Dee Why five years ago, urged others to learn from his experience and not go into the surf alone.

“My mistake was going alone, especially me, or anyone that is foreign and probably less experienced than some locals, you definitely have to go with a partner and you have to try to swim within the flags, that is so important,” he said.

Northern Beaches Council aquatic services executive manager Peter Livanes said efficiencies created from the merger of the three former councils — Manly, Warringah and Pittwater — meant it could keep lifeguards on patrol longer.

Pooyan Shargh was rescued by lifesavers at Dee Why Beach after he was found face down. Picture: Phil Rogers.

“Lifeguard presence meant our team were able to respond immediately and provide the highest level of care,” Mr Livanes said.

Mr Mortimer said that changes in shifts meant they were stationed at Dee Why during winter this season.

“This time of year, normally lifeguards are gone but we are staying longer now, just because it has been busier, winter is getting warmer.

“We are here on the weekends — two years ago we wouldn’t have been here,” Mr Mortimer said.

“The old mentality was we used to just watch the flags but now it is different — it is a whole-beach approach. We watch everything.

“You’ve got the playgrounds, surfers, bodyboarders, rock fishermen, not just the swimmers.”

Mr Livanes said the council’s professional lifeguard service conducted more than 220,000 preventive actions during the 2016/17 season.

“I’m extremely proud of the professionalism and work ethic of our team to keep the community safe,” he said. “The northern beaches has some of the best beaches in the world and our team strives to provide the highest level of beach safety to match.”

Simple Instruction provides Spinal training as part of our first aid and CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Originally published: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/bodyboarder-returns-to-thank-hero-lifeguards-after-crashing-headfirst-into-sand-at-dee-why-beach/news-story/97a3195d36e65ee22079d7d8e42fc46d

Dee Why, Northern Beaches, Sydney – HLTAID004 Training Course

July 10th, 2017

Dee Why RSL is centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Simple Instruction is conducting public First Aid and CPR courses every 5 days during the month of July and August. Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004.

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 course is for anyone in the childcare industry and covers the asthma and anaphylaxis components as well as the first aid and CPR components.

The HLTAID004 course has been price reduced for this financial year as we have seen an increase in childcare professionals taking up the opportunity. Our Registered Training Organisation RTO Allen’s Training has also reduced their costs to Simple Instruction and we have passed this onto our TAFE and child care Certificate 3 graduates.

We look forward to all child care centres taking up the opportunity to be trained by Simple Instruction in the HLTAID004 and look forward to continuing to support the Northern Beaches community. Simple Instruction also comes to your child care centre or pre school at a time that suits you.

 

Northern Beaches Defibrillator Access

July 6th, 2017

Northern Beaches defibrillator roll out – well done Duncan Kerr! With this great initiative we need to make sure the Northern Beaches community is trained in CPR and defibrillator use. Please book into a HLTAID001 Provide CPR training course at the Dee Why RSL

Original Article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/public-access-defibrillators-to-be-installed-in-hightraffic-areas-on-the-northern-beaches/news-story/d6a0fdc81ee672a5f7e55349dbba2c84

Public access defibrillators to be installed in high-traffic areas on the northern beaches
Robbie Patterson, Manly Daily
July 5, 2017 12:00am

PUBLICLY accessible defibrillators would be rolled out across high-priority areas of the northern beaches as part of a campaign to improve survival chances of heart attack victims.

Frenchs Forest resident Duncan Kerr, a paramedic of 10 years, has urged Northern Beaches Council to explore the possibility of putting 24-hour public-access defibrillators in high-traffic areas.

He highlighted areas such as The Corso at Manly, Warringah Mall and high-use sporting fields as key spots.

Mr Kerr said defibrillators were often hard to access as they are usually locked away inside sport clubs.

A public access defibrillator could be installed in Manly Corso. Picture: David Swift.
“These are public-access defibrillators, which means anyone can use, ” he said.

The former Warringah councillor and member of the Cardiac Arrest Survival Foundation, pointed to the peninsula’s only device of that calibre, which has been installed at Cromer Park.

“It is a big deal, especially at night or if you are just out walking the dog and no one else is around and something happens,” he said.

“They are always accessible and always monitored, which means when you pull the defibrillator out a triple-0 call is made.”

At last week’s Northern Beaches Council meeting, infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor agreed to look into the proposal.

Northern Beaches Council infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor. Picture: Troy Snook.
“If you save one life, it is well and truly worth supporting such a proposal,” he said. “My recommendation would be that council support sporting clubs in terms of the rollout of portable defibrillators but also look at high-priority sites across the local government area (for the public-access models).”

He said the council would “see if external funding from the Office of Sport and Recreation was available”, but would also look at the council’s budget.

Mr Kerr, who plans to run for the Northern Beaches Council, said he would be pushing this as a major policy issue ahead of the September 9 election.

What’s On? Northern Beaches Council Events – School holidays

June 30th, 2017

Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 training courses provided by Simple Instruction are on some of the things happening in the July School Holidays.

All public courses are conducted at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) and is centrally located to cater for all suburbs from Brookvale to Avalon, Manly to Belrose and Freshwater to Mona Vale. All courses are accredited through Allen’s Training.

Simple Instruction is a proud Northern Beaches, Sydney business and want to ensure we have a safe community. Please ensure you are safe these school holidays and get trained in First Aid or CPR. Private courses are available!

If you are looking for things to do it might be wise to have a ‘staycation’ and look at the Northern Beaches Council link listed below.

http://thingstodo.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/whats-on/event-calendar

First Aid Northern Beaches – Dee Why RSL Training Course

May 4th, 2017

First aid for Northern Beaches locals is a vital skill. Having the skills to able to save someones life is something you will never forget. Northern Beaches and Simple Instructions first aid courses are designed to help you feel ready to deal with an emergency situation. We don’t bore you with a long day of dull power point presentations we make sure that you are moving and practicing the first aid skills.

As a first responder — and as any of my professional paramedic friends will say — there’s nothing worse than attending a drowning incident involving a child and finding people standing around panicking and unsure of what to do.

With the prevalence of backyard pools in Australia and our love of the water, it’s an all too common scenario. To know that there was a chance to save that child’s life if only someone had even attempted CPR is just awful.

People panic — we get that — but first responders are human too and any incident involving a child really hits you emotionally.

Even rudimentary first aid skills could make all the difference in a drowning situation. Especially involving kids. Because with quick intervention — a drowning child has got a better chance of making it than adults do.

Statistics show that injuries and accidents are the leading cause of death in children aged 1-14 — and boys make up two thirds of that number.

Yet 40 percent of parents say they wouldn’t be confident in knowing what to do if their child — or another child or adult — were drowning and 25 percent say they wouldn’t be confident in administering CPR to a child.

I’m a parent to two kids myself and I can’t imagine any worse feeling in an emergency situation involving a child, than looking back and thinking “I wish I’d known what to do or I wish I’d done that first aid course I kept saying I’d do”.

A fairly minor accident I witnessed has always stayed with me. I saw a boy running around the edge of a swimming pool — in what seemed like slow motion, he slipped and bashed his face resulting in quite a nasty cut in his mouth.

Those kind of injuries tend to bleed a lot but aren’t necessarily serious. What really struck me was that his mum had no idea what to do and she went into shock herself because of the panic. She was screaming and crying and it was actually making her son worse.

Of course, it’s understandable. No parent can stand to see their child hurt or in pain, but if the Mum had a bit of an idea what to do she would’ve felt so much better because she had the skills to help her son.

Everyone’s busy, but in the critical moment where even a bit of first aid knowledge could save a life, I think most parents would rather be able to say they’d done all they could to prepare.

The stats say that around 50 percent of parents say they don’t have any first aid knowledge at all or wouldn’t know how to treat certain injuries.

The most common injury incidents involving kids under 15 — after car accidents — would be sporting related or falls especially from trampolines or bikes, scooters or skateboards. These often result in concussions, sprains and fractures.

Most people know what to do to stem bleeding, but I’ve lost count of the times I’ve seen a big icepack dumped on top of a break or fracture which can actually cause more pain and damage because of the pressure.

People see swelling and immediately think ice but it’s not always the right thing to do. Just even knowing a bit about assessing injuries is helpful.

Other injuries or issues we’d most commonly see affecting kids are usually to do with burns, poisoning, choking, asthma or anaphylaxis attacks.I think having a broad range of first aid skills particularly those that cover off issues most likely to affect kids is a good place to start but even only knowing something about CPR is useful.

St John Ambulance WA offers a specific nationally accredited CPR course where you can come in for half a day and train in the recovery position and basic CPR. We also run Caring For Kids courses during school hours which covers all the major first aid components, including CPR, then if you want, you can go into more advanced training too.

First aid knowledge can go such a long way in making a bad situation less awful. I think of having first aid skills, especially as a parent, as like a type of insurance on your child.

Of course they’ll help if the worst happens — and hopefully you’ll never need them — but the peace of mind is priceless too.

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