First Aid Certificate required in the industry. HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001 available

October 6th, 2018 by ian

First Aid certificates are required in all Northern Beaches workplaces. Are you covered by insurance? Have your employees updated their CPR training and certificates?

Simple Instruction offers accredited HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and Provide CPR HLTAID001 training courses at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Book in to update your training certificate and qualifications in October and November.

The 4 Workplace First Aid statistics that you need
to know
1. Only 13% of employers are compliant with the First Aid national code of practice
(This code of practice requires employers to implement training for first aiders, first aid procedures and have
sufficient first aid kits and signage)
2. Over 65% of employers are unaware of their obligations under the First Aid code of practice
3. Only 31% of Australian workers feel confident in how to response to a workplace first aid emergency
4. Less than 50% of workplaces offer First Aid training to their employees
The statistics above paint a picture that illustrates Australian workplaces aren’t adequately prepared for First Aid emergencies
in the workplace. Further the majority of Australian employers are unaware of their requirements under the national code
of practice.
First Aid training is one of the best control measures to ensure that your workplace is adequately prepared for first aid
emergencies that may occur at work. First Aid training must be relevant to the industry and workplace to ensure that it is well
accepted by all course participants.
Our First Aid research found that:
• Employers should ensure an accurate first aid training register is maintained and regularly reviewed to ensure
compliance with the code of practice
• The majority of workplaces are ill prepared to effectively deal with an incident at work
• First Aid training improves the confidence of workers to respond to an on-site First Aid emergency
If you want to substantially reduce the risk of your workers not knowing what to do during a First Aid emergency, you should
consider a 4 point approach to First Aid safety and compliance:
1. Offer first aid training to all interested staff and ensure that adequate numbers of people are trained to act as First
Aiders and a First Aid register is kept up to date
2. First Aid response procedures are written and kept up to date as a protection for First Aiders at work and as protection
for the employer
3. Adequate First Aid kits and signage is in place according with the code of practise
4. Regular emergency response drills should be conducted to ensure that you are prepared for any eventuality
Summary:
This paper is an educational tool to give you the knowledge and skills to decide on the most appropriate First Aid safety
measures for your workplace. I hope you read this document and this helps you in making an informed decision to reduce
the likelihood of workers not knowing how to respond to a First Aid incident your workplace. We wish you the very best with
your workplace safety and we hope that this tool helps you to understand some of the research from within this field.

All courses through Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909. Find us online www.simpleinstruction.com.au

First Aid and CPR certification

September 16th, 2018 by ian

First Aid and CPR certificates must be current at all times in order for your Exercise Professional Registration with Fitness Australia to remain valid. Your insurance may also be invalid if your first aid or CPR certificates expire.

First Aid and CPR certification (combined) should include the unit of competency:

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 (also known as Senior First Aid, Workplace Level 2 or Apply First Aid).

The unit HLTAID001 is required for the CPR update.

An Australian First Aid certification is valid for 3 years and CPR is valid for 12 months.

AusREPs must ensure compliance with relevant legislative requirements in relation to first aid, including State/Territory requirements for currency.

Simple Instruction is your local Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Provider offering HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 CPR training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

First Aid Kit and First Aid Course

September 7th, 2018 by ian

As well as knowing some basic first aid techniques, it is important that households and workplaces have a first aid kit that meets their needs and is well organised, fully stocked and readily available at all times.

The contents should be appropriate to cope with a range of emergency situations, depending on the setting. It’s a good idea to have a number of kits handy in different places, such as in the home, car or office.

First aid kits are available for purchase from a variety of providers, including Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 or your local pharmacy. Specialty kits are also available to meet specific needs.

Simple Instruction is your local Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR training provider. We conduct accredited training courses out of the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) which are very popular. Centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney the training courses are the HLTAID003 Provide First Aid Course, HLKTAID001 Provide CPR and HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting.

Please book with www.simpleinstruction.com.au or www.northshorefirstaid.com.au

First Aid Techniques – HLTAID003 Provide First Aid

August 26th, 2018 by ian

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

It is a good idea to take a first aid course so that you can recognise an emergency and give basic first aid until professional help arrives.
Learn the first aid method of DRSABCD
First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan.

DRSABCD stands for:
Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.
Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?
Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.
Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?
If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.
If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.
Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) – if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin. Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds. The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.
Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations. An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself. The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

Book a first aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on the Northern Beaches with courses conducted at the Dee Why RSL. HLTAID003 Provide first aid is our most popular first aid course and the HLTAID004 Child Care first aid course for anyone in the child care industry under ACECQA. The HLTAID001 Provide CPR is a great refresher training course for those looking top update their skills.All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and the accredited and preferred supplier on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All training course participants will receive a free manual, free chart and free CPR face shield.

Provide CPR when its needed! Northern Beaches Training Courses available.

July 29th, 2018 by ian

Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 conducts training courses on the Northern Beaches. Simple Instruction provides First Aid, CPR and Child Care First Aid Courses. Time to book online for a easy first aid or CPR course.

Young footballer’s sudden death shocks small Victorian town

A young country football player is being mourned after collapsing and dying at the end of a match near Ballarat yesterday.

The man, aged in his 20s, had just finished a match at Learmonth oval when he told team mates he wasn’t feeling well.

Shortly after 4.00pm, he walked over to the sidelines where he collapsed.

Paramedics and club staff made efforts to revive the Dunnstown Football Club player, but he died at the scene.

The Central Highlands Football League released a statement saying “members are shocked at the tragic death of a Dunnstown reserves player”.

The statement said the man, whose name has not been released, collapsed at the end of a game and that nothing within the match led to the player’s death.

“Despite the best efforts of club staff and paramedics he was not able to be saved,” the statement read.

The organisation also offered support to members affected by the tragedy.

In May, 22-year-old Tory Brunning was playing a rugby match in Sydney’s Illawarra region when he collapsed in the sheds during half-time.

He was unable to be revived.

Last month, Liam Birch a young AFL player in Wallan, Victoria, suffered a heart attack on the field in the middle of a match.

One of the spectators was able to save his life by performing CPR on the young man.

No further information has been released on the man’s health or any prior medical conditions from yesterday’s tragedy.

The club has requested the privacy of the player’s family be respected at this difficult time.

Police are not treating the death as suspicious and a report will now be prepared for the coroner.

Course Codes: HLTAID001, HLTAID003, HLTAID004

CPR Training Courses on the Northern Beaches

July 23rd, 2018 by ian

Book online for a Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide First Aid HLTAID003 Training Course conducted at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All courses are conducted under the Auspices of Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909.

If someone dropped to the ground beside you, would you know how to do CPR?

Jarrod MacDonald, 22, saved the life of his uncle Laurence Crawley last month after he dropped to the ground in cardiac arrest during a touch footy game at Brendale, north of Brisbane.

Mr MacDonald had done a CPR course just three days before and jumped into action, immediately starting CPR.

Luckily for the 49-year-old father-of-four the referee of the game just happened to be off-duty paramedic Leonie Van der Meer.

Ms Van der Meer spoke to her ambulance colleagues as Mr MacDonald continued compressions.

Paramedic Matthew Davis said he was immediately impressed by Mr MacDonald’s efforts upon arriving at the scene.

“I would struggle to find a paramedic that would have done a better job,” Mr Davis said.

Cheaper than St John’s, online course work, free manual, free CPR mask, free CPR chart

July 16th, 2018 by ian

Simple Instruction is based in Sydney’s Northern region (North Shore and Northern Beaches) but is willing to travel all over Sydney to complete nationally accredited training courses. We provide public training courses at The Dee Why RSL and are more than happy to come to your workplace, home, child care facility etc.

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 is a comprehensive course that will give you the knowledge, skills and confidence to help an ill or injured person until emergency help arrives. You will learn the DRSABCD action plan as well as Provide Cardiopulmonary resuscitation HLTAID001 (Including defibrillation), asthma, anaphylaxis and the management of various injuries and illnesses. Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 is required by ACECQA for anyone working with children including those completing their certificate 3 at TAFE in child services.

The First Aid training course has essential free online pre-work to be completed before you attend the course. Payment is easy and cheap. All course bookings receive a free manual, free CPR face shield, free CPR chart and a Dee Why RSL pen.

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 and are Nationally recognised and accredited.

First Aid Course – Northern Beaches. Do you know what to do?

July 15th, 2018 by ian

First Aid and CPR training on the Northern Beaches has never been so Simple! Do you know what to do in an emergency? Can you help a loved one? Do you know how to do CPR or use a defibrillator?

Book now with Simple Instruction for the HLTAID001 Provide CPR. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid or HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting. We conduct all public courses at the Dee Why RSL and will also do private courses throughout Sydney. All Accredited training courses are nationally recognised and conducted under the auspices of Allens Training RTO 90909.

People are dying of cardiac arrest because the majority of the public have no idea how to use a defibrillator, St John Ambulance has said.

Most people in the UK do not have the knowledge to respond if someone’s heart stops beating, a survey by the charity found.

Nearly two-thirds admitted they would not know what to do if faced with a cardiac arrest and seven out of 10 people said they would not feel confident using a defibrillator, according to the YouGov poll.

Defibrillator
Defibrillators are increasingly common in public places CREDIT: TELEGRAPH
The first aid charity warned that lives were being put at risk as it launched its campaign to educate the public how to deal with a cardiac arrest.

More than half of people do not know where their nearest life-saving equipment is and 62 per cent wrongly believe a defibrillator would cause harm to a patient, the survey also found.

But up to seven out of 10 people who suffer a cardiac arrest could survive if they are treated with a defibrillator within the first five minutes, St John Ambulance said.

None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life
James Radford, director of St John Ambulance
The charity urged people to find their closest defibrillator, be ready to spot the signs of cardiac arrest, know how to perform CPR and remember that early defibrillation gives the best chance of survival – grouped under the acronym C.A.R.E.

James Radford, director of St John Ambulance, said its research showed Britain has “a long way to go” in educating the public.

He said: “None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life, any more than we’d want them to stand by helpless if we suffered a cardiac arrest.

“That’s why we are urging everybody to learn the four simple steps of C.A.R.E today; so that if the worst happens tomorrow, we can all act quickly and confidently, especially when every second counts.”

Defibrillators are increasingly available in busy public spaces.

Earlier this year a study in Sweden found defibrillator-carrying drones could dramatically boost survival after a trial showed they could reach patients four times faster than an ambulance.

First Aid and CPR Safety Tip – Sydney Northern Beaches

June 19th, 2018 by ian

First Aid Course. Book your training today. Nationally Recognised Certificate. Excellent Provider. Great Location. We Come to You.

Even though running isn’t a contact sport, injuries and accidents can happen. There are few things worse than a gravel-encrusted knee or a muscle cramp that takes you out of the game. But what do you do if you’re far from home with limited resources when they happen?

Here are eight first aid tips every runner should know about and carry with them, whether you’re just going out for three easy miles on back roads or you’re racing a 50K on the trails.

1. Clean Cuts and Scrapes Right Away
One wrong step can lead to an open cut that derails your run, and although it’s tempting to push through, you should tend to it first. “The best thing to do is stop the bleeding, and clean and protect the area,” says Katie Lawton, an exercise physiologist in Rehabilitation and Sports Therapy at the Cleveland Clinic.

Jacob Erickson, a sports medicine physician at the Mayo Clinic, agrees. “Make sure to clean the area as soon as you are able with hydrogen peroxide or warm, soapy water. If you only have a bottle of water, that water will suffice,” he says. “Use some type of antibiotic ointment or plain petroleum jelly to keep the area moist. You can keep it exposed if it’s not draining, otherwise keep it covered until the drainage stops or is better controlled.”

If you don’t have supplies readily available, Lawton suggests using a T-shirt—especially if the wound is gushing. “Tear off a piece of your shirt and tie it on the area for compression,” she says.

2. Don’t Pop Your Blisters
We know: It’s the most tempting thing in the world to pop a blister, but it’s best to leave it alone. “To cut or ‘pop’ the blister can increase infection risk,” says Patrick Lank, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Cleaning your blister off with water can also make things worse, according to Lawton, because the combination of sweat and water has the potential to create more blisters. Instead, use gel blister pads or petroleum jelly to speed up healing.

blistered feet
GETTY IMAGESMHJERPE
3. Stay Hydrated
It’s easy for newbies and even experienced runners to lose track of hydration as factors like heat and humidity change. “Severe dehydration can cause lightheadedness, loss of consciousness, and confusion,” Lank says. “If you feel you are becoming dehydrated, it’s best to stop running, rehydrate, and give yourself time.”

You may also experience muscle cramps if you’re dehydrated, Lank adds. If this happens, Corey Wencl, L.A.T., athletic trainer at the Mayo Clinic, suggests you stop running and stretch the muscle out or massage it for some relief.

To prevent dehydration, Lawton recommends having salt or electrolyte tablets on hand—they’re easy to add to your water bottle. However, “be aware that some gel packets have caffeine, which is also a diuretic, and could be a cause for dehydration,” she says.

man running in the desert
GETTY IMAGESADAM HESTER
4. Always Apply Sunscreen
Lawton says applying SPF prerun is a must. But if you do end up with a bad burn, your first move is to get out of the sun. “Find a way to properly cover up your skin or seek shade,” she says. If it’s too late, you can find sunburn relief with aloe vera spray with lidocaine. “Do not use petroleum jelly, as this can trap the heat in that the body is trying to release,” she says. Drinking a lot of water is also key because burns can increase your risk of dehydration, adds Lank.

5. Stock Your Car With Supplies
You can’t realistically carry every first aid product with you on your run, but make sure to keep a kit in your car. “Have a single-use ice pack or elastic bandage on hand for bad sprains,” Lawton says. You also can’t go wrong with some Band-Aids, blister pads, and chafing cream.

6. Run With a Friend
It may sound obvious, but running solo can be risky in case of an emergency. So if you plan to run a more remote route, ask a friend to go along, suggests Wencl. If not, you can utilize safety features in certain apps and phones to have a close friend or family member keep track of you during your run.

Female runners
GETTY IMAGESWESTEND61
7. Let Someone Know Your Plans
When running solo, be sure to share your specific plans. “Let family members know what time to expect you home by and the location where you will be running, especially if you don’t like running with your phone,” Lawton says.

8. Know When to Call 911
“If you lose consciousness while running, you should immediately seek medical attention,” Lank says. The same goes for a friend or running partner. “And if you develop abnormal chest pain or difficulty breathing, you should immediately stop running call 911 to be brought to the hospital for evaluation.”

Asthma and Anaphylaxis Course – HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

June 11th, 2018 by ian

Northern Beaches HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training course is available at the Dee Why RSL weekly. This course is ideal for Child Care workers and anyone in the child services industry. Simple Instruction offers online easy of use training before sitting the course. Please contact our team for HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR certified and Nationally Recognised Training courses.

Who uses an EpiPen?
EpiPens are first aid treatment for anaphylaxis, a potentially life threatening allergic reaction that affects a person’s breathing and blood pressure.

EpiPens deliver a single shot of adrenaline to reverse the symptoms of anaphylaxis. Allergy sufferers who experience an anaphylactic allergic reaction need to call an ambulance immediately and go to hospital, both for further treatment and to be under observation for at least four hours.

Why is there a shortage?
Australian supplier Mylan says the US manufacturer Pfizer is responsible for the supply shortage. Pfizer puts the delay down to a problem with the autoinjector’s components – one that’s caused production delays for months.

Pfizer tells CHOICE the shortage has to do with a third-party component, as well as changes made to its manufacturing facility. “At this time, we cannot commit to a specific time for when the supply constraint will be fully resolved,” a spokesperson says.

The company is advising people to fill their prescriptions closer to expiration dates to help them manage EpiPen supply over the next few months.

What happens if I have an attack?
If you don’t have an EpiPen on hand, immediately call 000 – or better yet, have someone with you make the call.

Follow your ASCIA action plan that you’ve developed with your doctor, and either sit or lay down on the ground with your feet outstretched in front of you. Don’t stand up or sit on a chair, as this could cause a sudden drop in blood pressure.

If you’re having a severe allergic reaction, Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia recommends that you follow your ASCIA action plan:

sit or lie down on the ground
use the EpiPen on your outer mid-thigh
call for an ambulance
(if the symptoms persist and it’s needed) take a second EpiPen five minutes after the first.
You’ll need to go to hospital for further treatment and remain under observation for at least four hours.

Can I use an expired EpiPen?
Most allergy sufferers will have an EpiPen on hand, even if it’s an expired one.

EpiPens have a one- to two-year shelf life before they expire. It’s not ideal, but consumer allergy groups and pharmacists recommend people use their expired EpiPens if necessary during the shortage.

These adrenaline autoinjectors do become less effective over time, but the consensus is an expired EpiPen is better than not having one to use at the time of an attack.

If all of your EpiPens have expired, use the most recent one. Be sure to check the expiration date on the EpiPen itself and not on the box as they may differ.

You can gauge the quality of an EpiPen by checking the clear window near its tip. The adrenaline should be transparent – free from sediment and discolouration – for it to be most effective.

How long do I have to wait for a replacement EpiPen?
After leaving your prescription with a pharmacist, it takes between a couple of days to two weeks for an EpiPen to arrive.

The pharmacists we spoke to say they haven’t had EpiPens in stock for months. Before the shortage, pharmacies would typically stock two EpiPens at any time, with replacement stock being delivered daily.

The shortage has been going on for how long?
The government’s Therapeutics Goods Administration (TGA) says EpiPens have been in short supply since January 2018.

Initially orders were not being fulfilled at all, forcing people to visit different pharmacies in the hope they could find untapped stock. Supply has marginally improved, with an ordering system delivering EpiPens to the people who need an EpiPen the most.

Has the shortage been linked to any deaths or serious injuries?
The shortage has not been linked to any deaths or serious injuries in Australia, a Department of Health spokesperson told CHOICE.

We asked manufacturer Pfizer if it has contributed to any deaths or injuries globally, but the company chose not to address the question.

Can I reuse an EpiPen?

EpiPens can only be used once – even if there’s some adrenaline still in the device. After use, they should be placed in a container, marked with the time it was administered and handed over to ambulance staff.

Does the shortage affect EpiPen Junior autoinjectors?
EpiPen Junior autoinjectors are not experiencing a stock shortage.

Are there any alternatives to an EpiPen?
We’re one of the few countries that don’t have an alternative adrenaline autoinjector, along with Canada, which makes us more vulnerable to the ongoing shortage as people don’t have a substitute.

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