Archive for the ‘000 or 112’ category

First Aid Techniques – HLTAID003 Provide First Aid

August 26th, 2018

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

It is a good idea to take a first aid course so that you can recognise an emergency and give basic first aid until professional help arrives.
Learn the first aid method of DRSABCD
First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan.

DRSABCD stands for:
Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.
Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?
Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.
Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?
If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.
If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.
Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) – if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin. Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds. The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.
Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations. An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself. The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

Book a first aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on the Northern Beaches with courses conducted at the Dee Why RSL. HLTAID003 Provide first aid is our most popular first aid course and the HLTAID004 Child Care first aid course for anyone in the child care industry under ACECQA. The HLTAID001 Provide CPR is a great refresher training course for those looking top update their skills.All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and the accredited and preferred supplier on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All training course participants will receive a free manual, free chart and free CPR face shield.

Every Parent should know CPR and First Aid

August 4th, 2017

A mother has revealed how the first aid classes she took helped to save her son’s life when he stopped breathing.
Rachel Taylor had just called an ambulance when 10-month-old Finnley turned blue after going into septic shock.

Fortunately the 30-year-old was able to keep a calm head and performed the life-saving procedure until paramedics arrived.
Her action saved her son’s life and Rachael and Tom Batham are now urging others to learn CPR in case they ever find themselves in a similar situation.
‘It was petrifying but I just took my mind back to that day we did first aid training and just focused on what I needed to do,’ said Rachael, who is from Heaton, Newcastle.
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR

‘I didn’t start crying because there was no time to do that.’
Finnley first fell ill a month ago with a cold, cough and temperature and doctors prescribed him antibiotics for a possible infection.

Helicopter police officer spied on people sunbathing naked and having sex
On Monday I switched on the baby monitor and left him sleeping. Half an hour later, I heard a small noise,
so went up.
‘Finn was sat but as I went over to pick him up, his face just changed, it kind of contorted. Then he keeled over and started convulsing.
‘He’d had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with.’
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR
Finnley will make a full recovery (Picture: NCJ Media)
Rachael called 999 and was told an ambulance was on its way to her home.
But just as she was about to hang up Finnley stopped fitting, stiffened, turned blue and stopped breathing.

‘Panther-like creature’ stalks group for more than a mile through woodland
Rachael added: ‘That’s when the panic started to set in. I told the operator he’d stopped breathing and asked if I should do CPR.’
An ambulance crew arrived minutes later after FInnley was taken to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where he spent a week in intensive care.
Fortunately, he will make a full recovery but Rachael is now urging all parents to take paediatric first aid.
MORE: UK

Man stabbed in buttocks on platform of Leytonstone tube station

Soldier woke up to find false widow spider biting his leg

Hero computer expert who stopped cyber attack that hit the NHS is arrested
She said: ‘I don’t want to scare people but I want to raise awareness of how important it is. Without it, we could have lost him.
‘It was reading a story similar to ours on Facebook, that prompted me to book our course. I hope this might do the same for someone else.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/08/02/mother-reveals-why-every-parent-should-know-cpr-6823531/#ixzz4oklsMOjt

First Aid Certificate on the Northern Beaches

August 2nd, 2017

Training Courses on the Northern Beaches have never been so Simple! First aid and CPR courses are available most weekends at the Dee Why RSL. Course codes – HLTAID001, HLTAID003 and HLTAID004

Remember to call 000 or 112 for any emergency. Enjoy the CPR video below.

Provide First Aid and Provide CPR course – relaxed, simple, fun and relevant.

March 26th, 2017

Simple Instruction likes this article about first aid HLTAID003 and CPR HLTAID001 courses on the Northern Beaches. We hope you enjoy this article as well. We are trying to get the emphasis the importance of first aid training for their staff but this article on explaining first aid to students/kids is great. Simple Instruction first aid courses are designed for adults but we can come to you and complete a basic children’s first aid course or HLTAID004 courses so that they are aware especially of when to call 000. Some great ideas before you attend a first aid or CPR course here though.

“Mom, give me some ice.” Ranvir, 6, and Viraj, 4, hardly ever seem to get along. One can spot them getting on their mother’s nerves on several occasions. “Such is the case with siblings, especially boys, I guess,” says their mom, Smriti.

Last week however, Ranvir surprised his mother when he came running into the kitchen looking for ice. His brother had fallen off the bed and had got a bump on his head.

“Not only did Ranvir cajole Viraj, he even applied ice and an antiseptic cream on the wound,” says Smriti, proudly.

Smriti says that she feels a certain sense of relief knowing that her child is well equipped to be a caregiver in case there’s a need. “These are required skills you know and should not be looked upon as burdening the child.”

It’s comforting to know that children are competent, especially when it comes to first aid. “Nobody can misguide them,” she says. Plus, these are survival strategies that human beings should know.

Knowing first aid can be fascinating for children if we use the right methods. All we need to do is combine learning with our day-to-day slips and falls; our job is done.

Want to know how? Read the following 10 tips:

1) Wounds as stories

“I treat wounds while giving tips.”

Pranali, mother of a four-year-old, explains every step of the first aid that she gives to her child. Recently, he fell down the stairs and bruised his knee.

“I’m cleaning the wound with antiseptic first. This avoids infection,” she said as she started first aid. Then, she went on to explain that after cleaning, she is applying an antiseptic cream.

“I was crossing my fingers because he licks everything,” she chuckles and explains how her son took the tube of cream in his hands and looked at it as she applied.

“Shaurya stops crying and gets distracted when I involve him in doing his own first aid. I think he learns and remembers my tips,” says Pranali.

If you’re comfortable and calm while giving first aid to your child, you can help him/her remain calm during medical emergencies too. Also, you’re teaching first aid.

Sounds cool. Doesn’t it?

2) Replicate

“He’s a lot into superheroes. They thrill him,” says Ashish. His seven-year-old enjoys action-packed films and does not get anxious or scared when he witnesses accidents. That gave Ashish an idea to teach his son about first aid by replicating a few things at home.

“I used socks and cotton balls to display swellings,” when his son had wanted to see what a swelling around a wound looked like. Ashish also showed him the way to tie bandages.

“I put some tomato sauce on my arm, told my son that a wound bleeds like that, and taught him how to bandage it. The sauce made it fun!”

Ashish believes that there’s no harm being realistic with your children. They need to know how the human body reacts during adverse situations so that, god forbid, if they are in similar situations, they know what to do.

Makes sense!

Doctor doctor!3) Play doctor

Well, this is a tried and tested, age-old method that still works. Playing doctor with young kids teaches them a lot about medical emergencies while maintaining a dose of fun.

“I don’t want him to get nightmares about cuts and wounds,” says Anamika. Her son is barely three and they’ve recently bought him a doctor’s kit. Since he wants to learn how to use it, she uses playtime to teach him about first aid.

“I know he is still too young, but I thought why not start now,” she explains.

Children learn fast when they find fun and relaxation in learning which is why Anamika feels that planning out serious first-aid sessions may not work with her son. During his natural urge for playing doctor, she is teaching her son about injuries, falls, and accidents.

“He listens to it like a story. Later, he’ll know better and by then, we’ll have bypassed the fear,” she exclaims.

First aid kit!4) Make a kit

Mumbai-based preschool teacher Jhanvi tells me that making a first-aid kit together is a good way to teach children the uses of each thing that go into the kit.

It also helps them understand that the first-aid kit is to be used in case of an emergency, it isn’t a toy.

“Yes, many times my kids play with the kit and spoil the contents, especially creams. It’s risky but I need to keep the kit easy-to-reach too,” says Dipika, mother to two boys.

Making a kit together will work as a DIY activity as well as a session on the importance of first aid. Try it!

5) The priority list

“My daughter does not have patience to sit and listen. Even if it’s her favourite activity, I cannot make her sit for more than 10 minutes at a stretch.”

Ridhima’s daughter is like any other kid—she lacks patience. Making a priority list of problems where first aid might be required and teaching children about those aspects first, helps curb this problem.

So, what can be included in this list?

Stopping a wound from bleeding
Holding nostrils to stop a nosebleed
Running a burnt body part under water
Putting ice over swellings
“We made a decorated chart with kids where we drew different body parts and basic first aid for them. It was fun,” says Shradha from Notre Dame Academy, Patna.

Why don’t you try making a quick chart or list too?

6) ‘Might’ happen and not ‘will’ happen

“Don’t scare them by saying that these things will happen. That’s key to teaching first aid,” says Dr Thakrey from Mumbai-based Sai Swasthya Clinic.

“Make them feel like superheroes who have the power during any medical emergency,” he says. He explains that describing to children the gory details, plus how important it’s to manage oneself during a medical problem will scare them and first aid should work as a fun tool.

“Kids are smart enough to apply knowledge when needed, we need not push it,” he concludes.

7) All that breaks

“I introduced him to first aid for fractures by using a doll. By slowly bending the doll’s limbs, I spoke about cracked bones and he listened to me, mesmerised,” says Sheena.

Sheena is a dentist who is currently a stay-at-home mom. She enjoys passing on her medical knowledge to her six-year-old.

Sheena says that talking to kids about bones and blood supply grabs their interest. “These things are real and there’s a lot of fun in reality,” she says. She has explained to her son that when bones get hurt, blood oozes out from them, which is why they hurt so much.

In these times, one must be patient with the person who is suffering the pain. Secondly, if he comes across someone who has fallen or is complaining of a hurting bone, he should immediately call another adult to help. Calling for help is also first aid.

First aid for fractures and sprains also means making the person who has fallen sit or lie down in a comfortable position. Not touching the hurting bone is the last, but most important rule.

“Helping out without a first-aid kit also comes under first aid, doesn’t it?” asks Sheena and I agree. Don’t you?

8) Raise an alarm!

“They should know that calling an adult to help is sometimes the best help they can provide,” says Dr Thakrey.

Shalini, a marketing executive with a cosmetics firm and mother of two, says that children should be taught to raise an alarm. It’s not their job to assess a situation. By raising alarms during medical emergencies, they will help themselves out of the situation and help the person in need too.

So, teach them to raise an alarm!

9) Mind over matter!

“We dropped him and went grocery shopping next door. Our cell phones were out of reach in that basement shop. He managed alone!”

Swayam had hurt himself at the football field and was feeling faint after that. His coach did some first aid and thereafter, tried calling Swayam’s parents. He was not able to get across to them, but felt helpless since the rest of the team of six-year-olds could not have been left unattended.

While Swayam sat in a corner and waited for his parents, he decided to breathe and stay calm. He pulled out his napkin and pressed his wounds till he felt better.

“We arrived and panicked when we saw the coach panicking around him. But our son stayed calm,” say Swayam’s parents.

They add that we might not always have resources for first aid and even if we have them, they may not work if there is no presence of mind. So along with first aid, teach your kids to employ their minds too!

10) A kid is but a kid!

“Every time I talk about first aid, I talk about personal safety first,” says Swati.

She believes that the safety of her two sons is more important than them helping out. “You can’t jump into a pool to save someone even if you know how to swim,” she tells her kids.

Dr Thakrey says, “Kids are taught first aid to help. That does not mean that they fix other’s problems on their own. They also need to be taught whether a situation demands first aid or not.”

“Getting close to open wires, people who have burnt themselves, or someone injured on the road is not the business of kids,” he adds

“I don’t talk to my sons about all the scary things that might happen,” says Swati.

Don’t you think she’s right? Children need not worry about consequences as they learn first aid. All they need to focus on is that knowledge is fun and that they can help themselves if certain situations arise.

As they say, knowledge is power!

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid Course – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

October 25th, 2016

Do you think its time to complete the HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting?

Learn all the important skills to save your child.

Topics include:

CPR
Asthma Awareness
Fracture management and skin injuries
Anaphylaxis
Control of external bleeding
Medical Conditions

A local mum has stressed the benefit of learning first aid after ‘one of the scariest moments of her life’ occurred when her little girl began choking. A child choking is among every parent’s greatest fears and one which was shockingly real for Martina Cullen, the Donegal mum behind this weekend’s Bump and Baby Expo in Letterkenny. The traumatic incident involving her first child, at the age of just 10 months, left Martina regretting that she’d never learned how to respond to such a life-threatening situation. When she set about organising a two-day baby show featuring the latest products, service and expert advice for parents, top of her list was the provision of expert advice on child choking and first aid.“There were so many things I hadn’t a clue about as a first time parent but in hindsight child first aid is vitally important. “To see your baby choking is a horrific experience. Our little girl was playing on a mat when all of a sudden she went quiet. My husband lifted her up and saw she was in distress – unable to breath, gasping to get air. “In that moment we both realised that we didn’t know what to do. We tried slapping her gently on the back but didn’t want to hurt her, we tried looking in her mouth but nothing was visible. We had no idea what she had swallowed. “She was turning blue. Within 30 seconds we were in the car and on the way to the hospital which was only a few minutes from the house. My husband kept tapping her on the back the whole way. It wasn’t until we were pulling into the hospital grounds that she finally vomited and started to breathe once again. Words can’t describe the relief as we pulled into A&E and she was smiling as though completely unaware of the danger. “We were lucky, sadly it can be a different story for other families. That’s why two of our key talks during the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny in the Radisson Blu Hotel on Saturday and Sunday will be delivered by First Aid Aware on ‘What to do when a child is choking’ and ‘Choking hazards and what to look out for’.” First Aid Aware Paediatric Instructor Niall Clancy said families should be aware of the dangers to infants and young children to be best placed to deal with situations. “Choking is one of the main causes of cardiac arrest in children so it’s very important for parents and anyone responsible for children to know how to react. We’re delighted to be taking part in the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny where we’ll be giving people a chance to learn about what to do when a child is choking and allowing them to practice the techniques on mannequins. We’ll also be advising people on what dangers to look out for and explaining that if an item can fit through the inside of a toilet toll then it may represent a choking hazard,” he said. In establishing Bump and Baby Expo, Martina aimed to give parents “information that really matters” all under one roof. The career mum – who co-founded human resources and employment law consultancy, HR Team while pregnant with her second child and following a successful career as operations manager for a multinational retailer – said the event will be highly informative in everything needed from pregnancy to pre-school. “I have two bouncing baby girls aged one and three and – as anyone with young children will tell you – it can be hard to keep up with the latest information on products, child safety and health matters for mums and babies. “The whole idea behind the Bump and Baby Expo is to provide expert advice, the best products and most beneficial services needed by families with babies and young children.

Read more at: http://www.derryjournal.com/news/mum-urges-awareness-of-choking-hazards-and-first-aid-1-7528612

Book in to a Provide first aid or Provide CPR course on the Northern Beaches by checking our website at www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Provide CPR Training Courses vital and available on the Northern Beaches

July 5th, 2016

Simple Instruction is not St John’s Ambulance but we provide accredited training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney that is vital to all school students learning and just as effective. Simple Instruction is a local first aid and CPR provider and have been conducting courses in Northern Beaches schools since 2009. We conduct fundraisers for school and are happy to support any Northern Beaches cause.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/the-hills/never-too-young-to-save-someones-life/news-story/c78acdba7c8c26ebcf4391266fbc0a54

Boy, 9, saves little brother’s life after he stops breathing while parents rush him to hospital

Bev Jordan, Hills Shire Times
March 28, 2016 2:02pm

WHEN his five-year-old brother Ben stopped breathing, Zachary Redwood calmly performed lifesaving CPR..

Earlier this month, the Baulkham Hills boy celebrated his ninth birthday with his little brother and extremely proud and grateful parents by his side.

Zach learnt CPR last year at a first-aid training course run by long-time St John volunteers and his scout leaders at 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Group, Jennie and Taylor Page.

Three-year-old Ben with his big brother Zach, 9.
The boys’ father Julian said Ben ate a Snickers bar at a birthday party, then vomited up the peanuts. About 30 minutes later he had trouble breathing.

“We thought he might be having an asthma attack but he did not respond to treatment,” Mr Redwood said.

“At this point we realised this was now an emergency situation and decided to rush Ben to hospital.”

Mum Jenny drove Zach and Ben in her car while Mr Redwood followed in another car.

“During the trip to the hospital Ben stopped breathing, his lips turned blue, eyes rolled into the back of his head and he lost consciousness,” said Mr Redwood. “My wife was distraught.”

Ben and Zach at their Baulkham Hills home.
Mrs Redwood pulled over to the side of the road and Zach calmly put his first-aid lesson into practice, performing CPR on Ben as he had been taught to do.

“I just took my seatbelt off and I just breathed into him,” Zach said.

Mr Redwood said: “After a few minutes some colour returned to Ben’s face and lips and he regained consciousness.”

When the family arrived at The Children’s Hospital, Westmead, they were told they were lucky Zach had known how to perform CPR.

“I felt really helpless and scared,” Mrs Redwood said.

“Just knowing what to do is so important.”

Zach (right) learned CPR at a first aid course at the 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Group.
Ms Page said she couldn’t think of the story without getting emotional.

“I am so proud of (Zach),” she said.

“I feel children are never too young to learn CPR.

“Even if they can’t do it themselves because of their size, there is always a chance they can instruct an adult should the need arise.”

Julian Redwood with his sons Ben and Zac.
What to Do

■ Check for danger

■ Check if the affected person is conscious

■ If not, call 000

■ If yes, make the person comfortable

■ If unconscious, open the mouth, clear the airway

■ Check breathing

■ Start CPR if not breathing — 30 compressions, two breaths, then repeat

■ Place in recovery position when conscious

Zach (right) used the first-aid skills he learnt at Scouts to save his brother Ben’s life.
Jennie Page, a St John Ambulance superintendent and 2nd Baulkham Hills Scout Leader, said learning CPR should be compulsory in schools.

She has been running annual workshops for her cubs and scouts with the help of her daughter Taylor and other St John cadets for 10 years.

“I firmly believe that all school-age children should be taught first aid, including CPR.

“You can never be too young to know how to save a life,” she told the Times.

“Even if they can’t do it themselves because of their size there is always a chance they can instruct an adult should the need arise.

“We have had three reports of children saving lives in the past 18 months,” Mrs Page said.

She said she wished all primary schools took up the free St John Ambulance First Aid in Schools program. Last year, more than 20,400 students took part in the program.

There are two programs available. One is aimed at years 3 and 4 students and the other is for students in years 5 and 6.

Up to 40 St John volunteers deliver the program across NSW.

For details, call 9745 8740 or email [email protected]

Northern Beaches local – Guy Leech knows the importance of early Defibrillation and early CPR

April 11th, 2016

Nth Beaches – Manly Daily

Ironman Guy Leech wants TV friend’s death to make a difference, asking for firms to buy lifesaving device
April 5, 2016 12:00am
Sarah Swain – Manly Daily
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/northern-beaches/ironman-guy-leech-wants-tv-friends-death-to-make-a-difference-asking-for-firms-to-buy-lifesaving-device/news-story/083d445b2256a1c3d0d833f9cae9ac1a

A CELEBRITY fitness trainer has launched a campaign to get lifesaving medical devices into businesses and homes after losing a beloved friend to a heart attack.

World champion ironman and surf lifesaver, Guy Leech, wants firms, and even families, to invest in $2000 easy-to-use defibrillators which could mean the difference between life and death.

He believes his friend Charles Stewart, 63, known as Chucky, could have survived if one of the devices had been close when he had a heart attack in Manly, in January.

Guy Leech with his friend Charles Stewart, journalist and film maker, who died from a sudden heart attack in Manly this year. Picture: Supplied.
Leech, from Curl Curl, has trained stars including Madonna and George Clooney. He had been friends with the journalist, writer and filmmaker who used to work for Channel 9 on The Today Show, Wide World of Sports and Sports Sunday for 20 years.

He said he was like “an older brother” to him.

Chucky, from Seaforth, took part in Leech’s paddling group three times a week at Manly Cove, and was ‘strong and fit’ according to Leech

But on January 4, tragedy struck.

While the group was out in the harbour, Leech got a message that Chucky was heading back because he “wasn’t feeling 100 per cent”.

Leech want’s Chucky’s death to make a difference. He’s teamed up with defibrillator firm Physio-Control to get more into companies and homes. Picture: Troy Snook
And when the group got back to Manly Cove not long after, they noticed a man being given CPR on the grass near the beach.

Leech was shocked to realise it was his friend. He took over CPR until an ambulance arrived and a defibrillator brought back a faint heartbeat.

But it was too late, and Chucky’s life support was switched off at the Royal North Shore Hospital six days later.

Now Leech wants Chucky’s death to make a difference. He’s teamed up with defibrillator firm Physio-Control to get more into companies and homes.

Guy Leech is a former champion ironman and surf lifesaver.

Guy Leech tried to save his friend after he was found collapsed from a heart attack. Picture: Troy Snook
“It’s the difference between life and death,” he said. “More than 500 people a week have heart attacks or strokes. Unless a defibrillator is put on you within about three minutes you’ve got a 10 per cent chance of survival.

“The average time for an ambulance to arrive is 12 or 13 minutes.

“I don’t want Chucky’s death to be something that just goes by. He would want something to come from it.”

For details, visit guyleech.com.

Book your First Aid and CPR course with Simple Instruction at our Dee Why RSL training rooms. All courses include learning how to use the defibrillator. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Learn First Aid or CPR and save a life!

January 5th, 2016

In the Manly, Warringah and Pittwater regions of our beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney, we are blessed with fantastic water areas and beaches. It is important for everyone from Palm Beach to French’s Forest to Manly to become trained in First Aid and to potentially keep a loved one safe. Make the most of your holidays and get trained in our January 2016 courses that are available at the DY RSL in Dee Why. Make a payment with Simple Instruction to confirm your booking.

A FIRST aid course could save a life according to Red Cross and that life could be a young child.

Children and young adults are particularly at risk toddlers under four account for one in 10 drowning fatalities and young people from 15 to 24 account for 15%, knowing the basics of first aid can save lives according to Red Cross.

Ensure children are supervised when they go into the water even if they are strong swimmers, do not enter the water if someone appears to be drowning unless you are specifically trained, follow the basic life support procedure and do not endanger yourself, always call ‘000’ at the first opportunity to make sure help arrives as soon as possible.

A single day of training could potentially save the life of a friend or family member this summer and Red Cross offers a wide range of training courses in every state and territory. First aid trainer Anthony Cameron believes at least one person in every household should know first aid.

“First aid training is something you should do for the people you love.”

“Having the skills and confidence to react and respond correctly in an emergency can minimise the impact of an injury, assist with recovery and even save a life, it means you can relax a little more this summer.”

The funds generated from first aid training support the everyday work of Red Cross such as providing breakfast for school children who might otherwise go to school hungry, a daily phone call to check on the welfare of an elderly person living alone or clean water for families from remote villages in Myanmar and Timor-Leste.

To reserve a place at the next Red Cross first aid course in your area or to purchase a Red Cross first aid kit online go to redcross.org.au/firstaid or call 1300 367 428.

Warning for parents: Do you know what to do if your child starts choking?

November 15th, 2015

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/warning-for-parents-do-you-know-what-to-do-if-your-child-starts-choking/story-fni0cx12-1227607619027
November 15, 2015 12:00am
Jane HansenThe Sunday Telegraph

Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. We have courses conducted at the DY RSL at Dee Why which is a central location for the Northern Beaches. Make a payment online today.

WATCHING a few first aid videos on YouTube was all that stood between Claudine Thomas and her daughter Luciana choking to death.
“Mums around me had been telling me to do a first aid course and I hadn’t got around to it but I had watched YouTube videos to get the basics,” Ms Thomas said.

“I put her over my knee, supported her head and hit her back three times and out came this 5cm piece of grout. I was shocked and I still called an ambulance.”

Choking killed three NSW children last year and, with the peak season for choking coming up, doctors are warning that parents must be prepared, not wait until they are in the middle of a life or death situation.

“It’s a frightening event and you can’t check the internet then on what to do, you need to know beforehand what to do,” Dr John Curotta, from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, said.

The approaching festive season is a peak time for choking incidents, he said.

“A few years ago we had 10 cases coming up to Christmas. There’s Christmas parties, party food like nuts and stuff left behind like Lego and kids will swallow anything because they like to test taste things and test things with their mouths,” Dr Curotta said.

In Luciana’s case, it was a piece of loose tile grout.

Luciana, 13 months, almost choked on a piece of tile grout but her mother Claudine saved her. Picture: Justin Lloyd
The pair had been in the bathroom of their Parramatta home, brushing their teeth. Ms Thomas was distracted for only a moment. The next thing she knew, her child was choking.

“I heard this choking sound and I grabbed her and she was red and blue,” Ms Thomas, 31, said.

Luciana is now fine but Dr Curotta said parents cannot be complacent.

Thanks to Hollywood, he said most people mistakenly think the Heimlich manoeuvre, where you squeeze a child from behind and push their stomachs, is the correct technique.

“Heimlich is in everyone’s mind but it’s not the technique recommended and there’s remarkably little evidence that it works,” he said.“If the child is coughing but still breathing, the best thing to do is quiet them down and call the ambulance with no sudden moves, you don’t want to dislodge the object to a more dangerous position.

“If the child is blue and not breathing, the best thing to do is put the child across you knee with their head down lower than their chest and deliver four sharp blows between the shoulder blades.

“You have gravity helping and the chest on your knees so you are getting good pressure to get air to blast things out.

“If that doesn’t work, put your fingers down the child’s throat and by then you or someone else should call Triple-0.”

Choking is mainly caused by the inhalation of food, followed by inhalation of other foreign bodies. Small airways can easily become blocked or compressed.

CHOKING: WHAT TO DO

■ If child is choking, check first if the child is still able to breathe, cough or cry. Child may be able to dislodge the foreign object by coughing

■ If the child IS breathing, do not try to dislodge the foreign object by hitting the child on the back because this may move the food into a more dangerous position and make the child stop breathing. Phone Triple-0 for an ambulance

■ If the child is NOT breathing try to dislodge the foreign object by placing the child face down over your lap so that their head is lower than their chest and give the child four sharp blows on the back just between the shoulder blades. This should provide enough force to dislodge the foreign object

■ Check again for breathing. If the child is still not breathing, urgently call Triple-0 and ask for an ambulance. The ambulance service will tell you what to do next

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