Archive for the ‘Ambulance’ category

Certificate III in Childcare – HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting

October 23rd, 2018

Providing First Aid and CPR certificates for the childcare industry on the Northern Beaches is our pleasure. The HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting is for Certificate III students to complete their Childcare course. Book in online today to secure your spot in a first aid or CPR course at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches.

Food allergy occurs in around 1 in 20 children and in about 2 in 100 adults. The most common triggers are egg, cow’s milk, peanut, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy, fish and wheat. The majority of food allergies in children are not severe, and may be ‘outgrown’ with time. However, peanut, tree nut, seed and seafood allergies are less likely to be outgrown and tend to be lifelong allergies. Some food allergies can be severe, causing life-threatening reactions known as anaphylaxis.

What is allergy?
An allergy is when the immune system reacts to a substance (allergen) in the environment which is usually harmless (e.g. food, pollen, animal dander and dust mite) or bites, stings and medications. This results in the production of allergy antibodies which are proteins in the immune system which identify and react with foreign substances.

An allergic reaction is when someone develops symptoms following exposure to an allergen, such as hives, swelling of the lips, eyes or face, vomiting or wheeze. It is important to note that only some people with allergy antibodies will develop symptoms following exposure to the allergen, hence confirmation of allergy by a clinical immunology/allergy specialist is required.

Allergic reactions range from mild to severe. Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction.

Symptoms of food allergy
Mild to moderate symptoms of food allergy include:

Swelling of face, lips and/or eyes
Hives or welts on the skin
Abdominal pain, vomiting
Signs of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to foods include:

Difficult/noisy breathing
Swelling of tongue
Swelling/tightness in throat
Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice
Wheeze or persistent cough
Persistent dizziness and/or collapse
Pale and floppy (in young children)
Food allergy can sometimes be dangerous
Although Mild, moderate and even severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to foods are common in Australia and New Zealand. However, deaths from anaphylaxis due to food allergy are rare in Australia and New Zealand. Most deaths can be prevented by careful allergen avoidance measures and immediate administration of an adrenaline autoinjector.

The most common foods causing life-threatening anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and egg. Symptoms of anaphylaxis affect our breathing and/or our heart.

Sometimes food allergy may be less obvious
Less common symptoms of food allergy include infantile colic, reflux of stomach contents, eczema, chronic diarrhoea and failure to thrive in infants.

Not all adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy
The term allergy is often misused to describe any adverse reaction to foods which results in annoying (but ultimately harmless) symptoms such as headaches after overindulging in chocolate or red wine, or bloating after drinking a milkshake or eating too much pasta. While these reactions are not allergic, the result is a widespread impression that all adverse reactions to foods are trivial.

Adverse reactions to foods that are not allergy include food intolerances, toxic reactions, food poisoning, enzyme deficiencies, food aversion or irritation from skin contact with certain foods. These adverse reactions are often mistaken for food allergy.

How common is food allergy and is it increasing?
Studies have shown that food allergy affects 10% of children up to 1 year of age; between 4-8% of children aged up to 5 years of age and approximately 2% of adults.

Hospital admissions for severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have doubled over the last decade in Australia, USA and UK. In Australia, admissions for anaphylaxis due to food allergy in children aged 0 to 4 years are even higher, having increased five-fold over the same period.

Why the rise in food allergy?
We currently do not have clear information as to why food allergy seems to have increased so rapidly in recent years, particularly in young children. This area requires additional research studies, several of which are already underway.

Proposed explanations (which have not yet been proven in studies) include:

Hygiene hypothesis, which proposes that less exposure to infections in early childhood, is associated with an increased risk of allergy. A more recent version of the hygiene hypothesis proposes that the make-up and type of the micro-organisms to which the mother, baby and infant is exposed and colonised with may alter allergic risk.
Delayed introduction of allergenic foods such as egg, peanut or tree nuts.
Methods of food processing, such as roasted versus boiled peanuts.
Development of allergy to food by skin exposure such as the use of unrefined nut oil based moisturisers.
These areas require additional research studies, several of which are underway.

Allergies to cow’s milk, eggs and peanuts are the most common in children
Nine foods cause 90% of food allergic reactions, including cow’s milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, sesame, soy, fish, shellfish and wheat. Peanut, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, sesame and egg are the most common food allergens in older children and adults. Other triggers such as herbal medicines, fruits and vegetables have been described and almost any food can cause an allergic reaction.

When does food allergy develop?
Food allergy can develop at any age, but is most common in young children aged less than 5 years. Even young babies can develop symptoms of food allergy.

Reliable diagnosis of food allergy is important
Your doctor will normally ask a series of questions that may help to narrow down the list of likely causes such as foods or medicines consumed that day, or exposure to stinging insects. This approach will also help to exclude conditions that can sometimes be confused with food allergy and anaphylaxis.
Skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests help to confirm or exclude potential triggers. Sometimes a temporary elimination diet under close medical and dietetic supervision will be needed, followed by food challenges to identify the cause. Long term unsupervised restricted diets should not be undertaken, as this can lead to malnutrition and other complications such as food aversion.

While the results of allergy testing are a useful guide in determining whether the person is allergic, they do not provide a reliable guide to whether the reaction will be mild or severe. Information on allergy tests is available on the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/allergy-testing

Food allergy does not run in the family
Most of the time, children with food allergy do not have parents with food allergy. However, if a family has one child with food allergy, their brothers and sisters are at a slightly higher risk of having food allergy themselves, although that risk is still relatively low.

Some parents want to have their other children screened for food allergy. If the test is negative, that may be reassuring, but does not mean that the other child will never develop an allergy in the future. If their screening test is positive, it is not always clear whether it definitely represents allergy. In this situation, a food challenge (under medical supervision) may be required to confirm the allergy.

A positive allergy test is not the same as being food allergic
It is important to know that a positive skin prick allergy test or allergy blood test means that the body’s immune system has produced a response to a food, but sometimes these are false positives. In other words, the test may be positive yet the person can actually eat the food without any symptoms. For this reason, it is important to confirm the significance of a positive allergy test (in some circumstances) with a supervised food challenge. In a child with a positive test of uncertain meaning, this is often done around school entry age under medical supervision. Interpretation of test results (and whether challenge should be undertaken) should be discussed with your doctor.

Unorthodox so called allergy tests are unproven
There are several methods of unorthodox so called tests for food allergy. Examples include cytotoxic food testing, Vega testing, kinesiology, allergy elimination techniques, iridology, pulse testing, Alcat testing, Rinkel’s intradermal skin testing, reflexology, hair analysis and IgG food antibody testing. These have no scientific basis, are unreliable and have no useful role in the assessment of allergy. These techniques have not been shown to be reliable or reproducible when subjected to formal study. ASCIA advises against the use of these tests for diagnosis or to guide medical treatment. No Medicare rebate is available in Australia for these tests, and their use is also not supported in New Zealand.

Adverse consequences may also arise from unorthodox testing and treatments. Treatment based on inaccurate, false positive or clinically irrelevant results is not only misleading, but can lead to ineffective and at times expensive treatments, and delay more effective therapy. Sometimes harmful therapy may result, such as unnecessary dietary avoidance and risk of malnutrition, particularly in children. Information on these methods is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/unorthodox-testing-and-treatment

Most children grow out of their food allergy
Most children allergic to cow’s milk, soy, wheat or egg will ‘outgrow’ their food allergy. By contrast, allergic reactions to peanut, tree nuts, sesame and seafood persist in the majority (~ 75%) of children affected. When food allergy develops for the first time in adults, it usually persists.

Allergic reactions may be mild, moderate or severe, and can be influenced by a number of factors
These factors include:

the severity of the allergy
the amount eaten
the form of the food (liquid may sometimes be absorbed faster)
whether it is eaten on its own or mixed in with other foods
exercise around the same time as the meal, as this may worsen severity
whether the food is cooked, as cooked food is sometimes better tolerated
the presence or absence of asthma
menstrual cycle in females
intake of alcohol
Can food allergies be prevented?
Information about allergy prevention is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention

Research into food allergy is ongoing
The increased frequency of food allergy is driving research into areas such as prevention, treatment and why it has become more common. Current areas of research include allergen immunotherapy (also referred to as desensitisation) to switch off the allergy once it has developed. Initial results are encouraging but it is not yet ready for routine clinical use. Research continues to explore new ways of more effectively treating this condition.

ASCIA Action Plans are essential
Many people with food allergies will have an accidental exposure every few years, even when they are very careful to avoid the foods they are allergic to. The difficulties of avoiding some foods completely make it essential to have an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis if an adrenaline autoinjector has been prescribed.

For those who are not thought to be at high risk of anaphylaxis and therefore have not been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector, an ASCIA Action Plan for Allergic Reactions should be completed and provided by your medical doctor. ASCIA Action Plans must be completed by a doctor and are available from the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources/ascia-action-plan-for-anaphylaxis

Living with your food allergy
As there is currently no cure for food allergy, strict avoidance is essential in the management of food allergy. It is important for individuals with food allergy to:

Carry their adrenaline (epinephrine) autoinjector (if prescribed) and ASCIA Action Plan with them at all times;
Know the signs and symptoms of mild to moderate and severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) and what to do when a reaction occurs;
Read and understand food labels for food allergy;
Tell wait staff that they have a food allergy when eating out;
Be aware of cross contamination of food allergens when preparing food.
Food allergy can be effectively managed
The good news is that people with food allergy can learn to live with their condition with the guidance of their clinical immunology/allergy specialist and a network of supportive contacts. Having an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and adrenaline autoinjector offers reassurance, but this is not a substitute for strategies to minimise the risk of exposure.

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (www.allergyfacts.org.au/) and Allergy New Zealand (www.allergy.org.nz) are community support organisations that offer valuable updates and tips for living with food allergies.

Further information on food allergy and anaphylaxis is provided on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy
www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources

First Aid Techniques – HLTAID003 Provide First Aid

August 26th, 2018

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

It is a good idea to take a first aid course so that you can recognise an emergency and give basic first aid until professional help arrives.
Learn the first aid method of DRSABCD
First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan.

DRSABCD stands for:
Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.
Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?
Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.
Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?
If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.
If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.
Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) – if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin. Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds. The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.
Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations. An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself. The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

Book a first aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on the Northern Beaches with courses conducted at the Dee Why RSL. HLTAID003 Provide first aid is our most popular first aid course and the HLTAID004 Child Care first aid course for anyone in the child care industry under ACECQA. The HLTAID001 Provide CPR is a great refresher training course for those looking top update their skills.All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and the accredited and preferred supplier on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All training course participants will receive a free manual, free chart and free CPR face shield.

CPR Training Courses on the Northern Beaches

July 23rd, 2018

Book online for a Provide CPR HLTAID001 or Provide First Aid HLTAID003 Training Course conducted at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All courses are conducted under the Auspices of Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909.

If someone dropped to the ground beside you, would you know how to do CPR?

Jarrod MacDonald, 22, saved the life of his uncle Laurence Crawley last month after he dropped to the ground in cardiac arrest during a touch footy game at Brendale, north of Brisbane.

Mr MacDonald had done a CPR course just three days before and jumped into action, immediately starting CPR.

Luckily for the 49-year-old father-of-four the referee of the game just happened to be off-duty paramedic Leonie Van der Meer.

Ms Van der Meer spoke to her ambulance colleagues as Mr MacDonald continued compressions.

Paramedic Matthew Davis said he was immediately impressed by Mr MacDonald’s efforts upon arriving at the scene.

“I would struggle to find a paramedic that would have done a better job,” Mr Davis said.

First Aid Course – Northern Beaches. Do you know what to do?

July 15th, 2018

First Aid and CPR training on the Northern Beaches has never been so Simple! Do you know what to do in an emergency? Can you help a loved one? Do you know how to do CPR or use a defibrillator?

Book now with Simple Instruction for the HLTAID001 Provide CPR. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid or HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting. We conduct all public courses at the Dee Why RSL and will also do private courses throughout Sydney. All Accredited training courses are nationally recognised and conducted under the auspices of Allens Training RTO 90909.

People are dying of cardiac arrest because the majority of the public have no idea how to use a defibrillator, St John Ambulance has said.

Most people in the UK do not have the knowledge to respond if someone’s heart stops beating, a survey by the charity found.

Nearly two-thirds admitted they would not know what to do if faced with a cardiac arrest and seven out of 10 people said they would not feel confident using a defibrillator, according to the YouGov poll.

Defibrillator
Defibrillators are increasingly common in public places CREDIT: TELEGRAPH
The first aid charity warned that lives were being put at risk as it launched its campaign to educate the public how to deal with a cardiac arrest.

More than half of people do not know where their nearest life-saving equipment is and 62 per cent wrongly believe a defibrillator would cause harm to a patient, the survey also found.

But up to seven out of 10 people who suffer a cardiac arrest could survive if they are treated with a defibrillator within the first five minutes, St John Ambulance said.

None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life
James Radford, director of St John Ambulance
The charity urged people to find their closest defibrillator, be ready to spot the signs of cardiac arrest, know how to perform CPR and remember that early defibrillation gives the best chance of survival – grouped under the acronym C.A.R.E.

James Radford, director of St John Ambulance, said its research showed Britain has “a long way to go” in educating the public.

He said: “None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life, any more than we’d want them to stand by helpless if we suffered a cardiac arrest.

“That’s why we are urging everybody to learn the four simple steps of C.A.R.E today; so that if the worst happens tomorrow, we can all act quickly and confidently, especially when every second counts.”

Defibrillators are increasingly available in busy public spaces.

Earlier this year a study in Sweden found defibrillator-carrying drones could dramatically boost survival after a trial showed they could reach patients four times faster than an ambulance.

First Aid – Shark, Bear and Snake

April 24th, 2018

First Aid Course. First Aid Training at the right price in a CBD location. On the Northern Beaches of Sydney Hopefully this man has some training. Free first aid manual. Free CPR Mask, Free Online workbook, Free First Aid App.

THIS guy is lucky to be alive – but otherwise he has the worst luck imaginable, after a series of terrifying run-ins with deadly animals.

WHEN Dylan McWilliams was bitten by a shark in Hawaii on Thursday, it meant he had been bitten by a shark, a bear and a rattlesnake — all in less than four years.

“I don’t know,” Mr McWilliams told the Honolulu Star-Advertiseron Friday. “I’m either really lucky or really unlucky.”

Not surprisingly, the 20-year-old from Grand Junction says he spends a lot of time outdoors.

In Thursday’s attack, about 50m from Shipwreck’s Beach off Poipu, Mr McWilliams suffered deep cuts to one of his legs, but the injury wasn’t life-threatening, reports Fox News.

“The scariest part was swimming back,” he told the news outlet, adding that he was hoping the shark wouldn’t continue following the trail of blood from his leg.

The leg wound required seven stitches, the Star-Advertiser reported.

Last July, McWilliams told the paper, he received nine staples in his scalp after a nearly 140kg bear invaded his Colorado campsite.

“The bear grabbed the back of my head and started pulling me and I was fighting back as best as I could,” he told Hawaii News Now. “It dropped me and stomped on me a little bit, and I was able to get back to the group and they scared it away.”

As for the rattlesnake, that encounter occurred about three-and-a-half years ago in Utah, Mr McWilliams told the Star-Advertiser.

Luckily, he took in only a small amount of venom, so he was only briefly ill afterwards, he told the newspaper.

“My parents are grateful I’m still alive,” he said.

This article was originally published by Fox News and is republished with permission.

Book a First Aid or CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL. We provide Nationally Recognised Courses that are accredited through RTO Allen’s Training. HLTAID001, HLTAID003, HLTAID004 training courses offered regularly.

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

CPR Performed on Collaroy Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney.

March 14th, 2018

A sad incident on the Northern Beaches where members of the public have performed CPR on a man who unfortunately has passed away. CPR is crucial life skill to learn and a massive congratulations should go to the people who got involved to help this man. Please remember that doing something is better than nothing when faced with a first aid situation. Follow the DRSABCD guidelines and you might be able to help a family member, friend or another member of the public.

Please get trained in CPR and first aid to help keep the Northern Beaches a safe place – it is a life saving skill that you may need one day.

Manly Daily, Manly Daily
February 20, 2018 6:07pm

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/man-dies-on-sydneys-northern-beaches/news-story/8d92e3880ab6e6b1d41b5dd61192b13e

A man has died at Collaroy Beach, on Sydney’s northern beaches, this afternoon.

Police said emergency services were called to Collaroy, just before 4.30pm, after a man was found unconscious in the water.

Members of the public commenced CPR on the man, aged in his 70s, before surf lifesavers arrived.

NSW Ambulance Paramedics and police attended, but he died at the scene.

Officers from Northern Beaches Police Area Command have commenced investigations into the incident.

Initial inquires suggest there are no suspicious circumstances.

All accredted training courses are held at the Dee Why RSL conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Free first aid manual and CPR face mask. Great Sydney CBD Locations.

January 17th, 2018

First Aid Course on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Book today. Excellent first aid and CPR instructors.

Aussie dad’s intuition saves his teen son’s life
A TEENAGER spent a painful 30 hours trapped in his crashed car in bushland until he was rescued by his father who hired a helicopter to find him.

When Samuel Lethbridge, 17, didn’t arrive at a friend’s home on Sunday — and when he failed to reply to messages — his family immediately feared the worst.

As his sister Megan posted frantic messages on social media asking for sightings, their father Tony Lethbridge followed his gut instinct. And that ultimately saved his son’s life.

The teenager was reported missing to police but by yesterday morning Mr Lethbridge decided to hire a chopper to find his son. And he knew exactly where to direct them to search.

“An accident happened there about five years ago … It stuck in my mind … I thought, ‘I can’t leave him out there without looking.’”

The car was eventually found 20m down a bank off the Pacific Highway at Crangan Bay, south of Newcastle. By the time emergency services were able to reach him he had been trapped with broken bones for about 30 hours.

The first on the scene initially feared what they would find inside, but were amazed when they saw his head move.

The rescue was described as extensive and difficult. Picture: Seven News
The rescue was described as extensive and difficult. Picture: Seven NewsSource:Channel 7

Mr Lethbridge was taken to John Hunter Hospital where he underwent surgery for multiple fractures, including a broken arm, leg and spinal injuries, as well as dehydration He remains in a serious condition.

“He’d been there all night. No one could see him from the road, no one at all,” NSW Ambulance superintendent Jeff Atkins said.

When rescuers found him they had to peel the roof back and cut the seats out to free him. The car was so seriously damaged after plunging through bushes as it rolled that Mr Lethbridge couldn’t move inside because he was pinned under the dash.

“He was trapped extensively in the car from the waist down and was fully conscious through the whole ordeal,” Mr Atkins said.

Once freed, he was carried up the bank on a stretcher to a waiting ambulance.

“It was a very extensive rescue, very difficult access, difficult extrication of the patient, [we’re] very lucky the young patient is still alive.”

Sister Megan Lethbridge took to Facebook last night to say how lucky she felt.

“Counting my lucky stars tonight [Sam] is doing well so far,’ she wrote.

[email protected]

Get trained in and accredited Provide First Aid HLTAID003 or Provide CPR HLTAID001 today. You could save a life through your training. We are located at the Dee Why RSL and have been conducting courses on the Northern Beaches of Sydney for many years. All course conducted under RTO Allen’s Training 90909.

BIG Freeze – Northern Beaches Ticks

November 21st, 2017

Simple Instruction loves promoting a great product and wants all Northern Beaches people to know about the recommended way to use First Aid and remove ticks. Please remember that child care workers HLTAID004 are not able to remove ticks or splinter in child care centres.

Scientist and gardener invents product to snap freeze ticks
Julie Cross, Manly Daily
November 19, 2017 12:30am
New research backs ‘freeze, don’t squeeze’
Mum almost dies after eating meat pie
A WOMAN who has suffered multiple tick bites while visiting the northern beaches believes she has invented a product which can freeze and kill them safely.

Peggy Douglass, 61, said her experience with ticks drove her to create a product to deal with the potentially life-threatening parasite.

Having trained in microbiology and chemistry, working for the Australian National University and then in food regulation bodies in the Commonwealth Government, she devised a pocket-sized solution, called Tick Tox.

It’s a simple aerosol can the size of a small deodorant tube. With one squirt it can snap freeze the tick.

Peggy Douglass has found herself covered in ticks after visits to family living on the northern beaches. Now she has produced a product called Tick Tox to kill them. Picture: Adam Yip
“In the old days I used to just pull them out,” Ms Douglass said.

“Sometimes I’d have 20 or more after working in my aunt’s garden in Palm Beach.

“Once I went home with 43.

“But having heard the advice that we should ‘freeze it, not squeeze it’, I looked around but found nothing that was specifically for ticks.”

At the moment tick experts advise people to use a freezing agent from the chemist.

The only ones available are for other conditions such as warts or tags.

Ms Douglass, who lives in Canberra, said hers is essentially the same product as those, but the applicator is smaller and more precise.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital, recently revealed results from a study looking at the best way to remove a tick.

He said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

Dr Andy Ratchford at Mona Vale Hospital Emergency department. Picture: Adam Yip
He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Prof van Nunen said she could not comment on the product Tick Tox, but would be looking at it with other members of Tick Induced Allergies Research and Awareness, TIARA, at their next meeting.

Tick Tox is currently on sale online at ticktox.com.au or from chemists in Avalon and Mona Vale.

Peggy Douglass with her product Tick Tox. Picture: Adam Yip.
HOW TO REMOVE A TICK
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off.

If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

Book in for a Simple Instruction First Aid or CPR course for November, December, and January 2018. We have Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 at the Dee Why RSL. Book online

Northern Beaches Hospital – Mona Vale Tick First Aid

November 5th, 2017

IN a world first, a northern beaches hospital has conducted research into the safest way to remove a tick.

First Aid for Tick removal provided in Simple Instruction First Aid training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital who was involved in the study, said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life-threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

“Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal. If you can remove the tick and decrease your chances of getting a reaction then that is important,” Dr Ratchford said.

Dr Ratchford said the advice was critical for those living on the northern beaches which was a known tick hotspot.

He said at Mona Vale Hospital they were seeing a year-on-year rise in tick related emergencies.

As well as dealing with minor reactions to tick bites, they were also seeing patients with cellulitis, tick typhus and those with life-threatening anaphylaxis caused by an allergy to a tick or to meat, brought on by a tick bite.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Last December an Avalon dad told the Manly Daily how he was left fearing for his life when his throat started to close up and his eyes and tongue turned black, after his wife pulled out a tick in his neck with her fingertips.

Mona Vale doctors had to give 53-year-old wool trader Michael Kiernan three emergency shots of adrenaline to help him breathe in the terrifying ordeal. Despite being bitten many times by ticks, he had never had a reaction before. Now he has to carry an lifesaving Epipen in case he gets another tick.

Michael Kiernan was left fearing for his life after a tick bite turned his eyes and tongue black.
Dr Ratchford said they saw most of their tick patients between July and December, as that was when the adult female needs its last blood meal before producing offspring.

He said during this period around two per cent of all cases at Mona Vale’s emergency department were tick-related, which was high.

The study looked at 124 patients between July and December in 2016. He said that didn’t include everyone who came to emergency with a tick bite, but a large sample of patients with tick issues.

Dr Ratchford said those on the frontline of tick emergencies had been advising people to freeze not squeeze ticks for some time.

One of the ticks removed from patients at Mona Vale Hospital. Picture: Adam Yip
However, without research to back it up health authorities have been reluctant to promote the method.

“There’s so much conflicting evidence out there on how to remove ticks, it’s a minefield,” he said.

“This is the first research looking at the best way to remove ticks.”

He said he would be submitting his research to journals in the hope of getting the information out there.

HOW TO REMOVE A TICK:
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off. If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

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