Archive for the ‘Childcare First Aid’ category

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Course

November 19th, 2018

First Aid and CPR Training courses located on the Northern Beaches. Simple Instruction conducts HLTAID003 Provide First Aid, HLTAID001 Provide CPR and HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting (childcare first aid) training courses at the Dee Why RSL which is the centre of the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Accredited and nationally recognised training courses with certification are our speciality and our Northern Beaches community has responded with 5 star Google reviews and positive feedback from all our training courses. Travelling from Mona Vale or even from the Sydney CBD is easy on the B Line with many people coming from all over Sydney. Many people travel from Manly, Brookvale, Belrose, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Cammeray, North Sydney, Mosman, Seaforth and from all over the Northern Beaches and North Shore with easy parking at the Dee Why RSL.

Book online now for the easiest, cheapest and best First Aid and CPR experience. Apply your first aid knoweldge. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allens Training RTO 90909

Certificate III in Childcare – HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting

October 23rd, 2018

Providing First Aid and CPR certificates for the childcare industry on the Northern Beaches is our pleasure. The HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting is for Certificate III students to complete their Childcare course. Book in online today to secure your spot in a first aid or CPR course at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches.

Food allergy occurs in around 1 in 20 children and in about 2 in 100 adults. The most common triggers are egg, cow’s milk, peanut, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy, fish and wheat. The majority of food allergies in children are not severe, and may be ‘outgrown’ with time. However, peanut, tree nut, seed and seafood allergies are less likely to be outgrown and tend to be lifelong allergies. Some food allergies can be severe, causing life-threatening reactions known as anaphylaxis.

What is allergy?
An allergy is when the immune system reacts to a substance (allergen) in the environment which is usually harmless (e.g. food, pollen, animal dander and dust mite) or bites, stings and medications. This results in the production of allergy antibodies which are proteins in the immune system which identify and react with foreign substances.

An allergic reaction is when someone develops symptoms following exposure to an allergen, such as hives, swelling of the lips, eyes or face, vomiting or wheeze. It is important to note that only some people with allergy antibodies will develop symptoms following exposure to the allergen, hence confirmation of allergy by a clinical immunology/allergy specialist is required.

Allergic reactions range from mild to severe. Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction.

Symptoms of food allergy
Mild to moderate symptoms of food allergy include:

Swelling of face, lips and/or eyes
Hives or welts on the skin
Abdominal pain, vomiting
Signs of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to foods include:

Difficult/noisy breathing
Swelling of tongue
Swelling/tightness in throat
Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice
Wheeze or persistent cough
Persistent dizziness and/or collapse
Pale and floppy (in young children)
Food allergy can sometimes be dangerous
Although Mild, moderate and even severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to foods are common in Australia and New Zealand. However, deaths from anaphylaxis due to food allergy are rare in Australia and New Zealand. Most deaths can be prevented by careful allergen avoidance measures and immediate administration of an adrenaline autoinjector.

The most common foods causing life-threatening anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and egg. Symptoms of anaphylaxis affect our breathing and/or our heart.

Sometimes food allergy may be less obvious
Less common symptoms of food allergy include infantile colic, reflux of stomach contents, eczema, chronic diarrhoea and failure to thrive in infants.

Not all adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy
The term allergy is often misused to describe any adverse reaction to foods which results in annoying (but ultimately harmless) symptoms such as headaches after overindulging in chocolate or red wine, or bloating after drinking a milkshake or eating too much pasta. While these reactions are not allergic, the result is a widespread impression that all adverse reactions to foods are trivial.

Adverse reactions to foods that are not allergy include food intolerances, toxic reactions, food poisoning, enzyme deficiencies, food aversion or irritation from skin contact with certain foods. These adverse reactions are often mistaken for food allergy.

How common is food allergy and is it increasing?
Studies have shown that food allergy affects 10% of children up to 1 year of age; between 4-8% of children aged up to 5 years of age and approximately 2% of adults.

Hospital admissions for severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have doubled over the last decade in Australia, USA and UK. In Australia, admissions for anaphylaxis due to food allergy in children aged 0 to 4 years are even higher, having increased five-fold over the same period.

Why the rise in food allergy?
We currently do not have clear information as to why food allergy seems to have increased so rapidly in recent years, particularly in young children. This area requires additional research studies, several of which are already underway.

Proposed explanations (which have not yet been proven in studies) include:

Hygiene hypothesis, which proposes that less exposure to infections in early childhood, is associated with an increased risk of allergy. A more recent version of the hygiene hypothesis proposes that the make-up and type of the micro-organisms to which the mother, baby and infant is exposed and colonised with may alter allergic risk.
Delayed introduction of allergenic foods such as egg, peanut or tree nuts.
Methods of food processing, such as roasted versus boiled peanuts.
Development of allergy to food by skin exposure such as the use of unrefined nut oil based moisturisers.
These areas require additional research studies, several of which are underway.

Allergies to cow’s milk, eggs and peanuts are the most common in children
Nine foods cause 90% of food allergic reactions, including cow’s milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, sesame, soy, fish, shellfish and wheat. Peanut, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, sesame and egg are the most common food allergens in older children and adults. Other triggers such as herbal medicines, fruits and vegetables have been described and almost any food can cause an allergic reaction.

When does food allergy develop?
Food allergy can develop at any age, but is most common in young children aged less than 5 years. Even young babies can develop symptoms of food allergy.

Reliable diagnosis of food allergy is important
Your doctor will normally ask a series of questions that may help to narrow down the list of likely causes such as foods or medicines consumed that day, or exposure to stinging insects. This approach will also help to exclude conditions that can sometimes be confused with food allergy and anaphylaxis.
Skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests help to confirm or exclude potential triggers. Sometimes a temporary elimination diet under close medical and dietetic supervision will be needed, followed by food challenges to identify the cause. Long term unsupervised restricted diets should not be undertaken, as this can lead to malnutrition and other complications such as food aversion.

While the results of allergy testing are a useful guide in determining whether the person is allergic, they do not provide a reliable guide to whether the reaction will be mild or severe. Information on allergy tests is available on the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/allergy-testing

Food allergy does not run in the family
Most of the time, children with food allergy do not have parents with food allergy. However, if a family has one child with food allergy, their brothers and sisters are at a slightly higher risk of having food allergy themselves, although that risk is still relatively low.

Some parents want to have their other children screened for food allergy. If the test is negative, that may be reassuring, but does not mean that the other child will never develop an allergy in the future. If their screening test is positive, it is not always clear whether it definitely represents allergy. In this situation, a food challenge (under medical supervision) may be required to confirm the allergy.

A positive allergy test is not the same as being food allergic
It is important to know that a positive skin prick allergy test or allergy blood test means that the body’s immune system has produced a response to a food, but sometimes these are false positives. In other words, the test may be positive yet the person can actually eat the food without any symptoms. For this reason, it is important to confirm the significance of a positive allergy test (in some circumstances) with a supervised food challenge. In a child with a positive test of uncertain meaning, this is often done around school entry age under medical supervision. Interpretation of test results (and whether challenge should be undertaken) should be discussed with your doctor.

Unorthodox so called allergy tests are unproven
There are several methods of unorthodox so called tests for food allergy. Examples include cytotoxic food testing, Vega testing, kinesiology, allergy elimination techniques, iridology, pulse testing, Alcat testing, Rinkel’s intradermal skin testing, reflexology, hair analysis and IgG food antibody testing. These have no scientific basis, are unreliable and have no useful role in the assessment of allergy. These techniques have not been shown to be reliable or reproducible when subjected to formal study. ASCIA advises against the use of these tests for diagnosis or to guide medical treatment. No Medicare rebate is available in Australia for these tests, and their use is also not supported in New Zealand.

Adverse consequences may also arise from unorthodox testing and treatments. Treatment based on inaccurate, false positive or clinically irrelevant results is not only misleading, but can lead to ineffective and at times expensive treatments, and delay more effective therapy. Sometimes harmful therapy may result, such as unnecessary dietary avoidance and risk of malnutrition, particularly in children. Information on these methods is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/unorthodox-testing-and-treatment

Most children grow out of their food allergy
Most children allergic to cow’s milk, soy, wheat or egg will ‘outgrow’ their food allergy. By contrast, allergic reactions to peanut, tree nuts, sesame and seafood persist in the majority (~ 75%) of children affected. When food allergy develops for the first time in adults, it usually persists.

Allergic reactions may be mild, moderate or severe, and can be influenced by a number of factors
These factors include:

the severity of the allergy
the amount eaten
the form of the food (liquid may sometimes be absorbed faster)
whether it is eaten on its own or mixed in with other foods
exercise around the same time as the meal, as this may worsen severity
whether the food is cooked, as cooked food is sometimes better tolerated
the presence or absence of asthma
menstrual cycle in females
intake of alcohol
Can food allergies be prevented?
Information about allergy prevention is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention

Research into food allergy is ongoing
The increased frequency of food allergy is driving research into areas such as prevention, treatment and why it has become more common. Current areas of research include allergen immunotherapy (also referred to as desensitisation) to switch off the allergy once it has developed. Initial results are encouraging but it is not yet ready for routine clinical use. Research continues to explore new ways of more effectively treating this condition.

ASCIA Action Plans are essential
Many people with food allergies will have an accidental exposure every few years, even when they are very careful to avoid the foods they are allergic to. The difficulties of avoiding some foods completely make it essential to have an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis if an adrenaline autoinjector has been prescribed.

For those who are not thought to be at high risk of anaphylaxis and therefore have not been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector, an ASCIA Action Plan for Allergic Reactions should be completed and provided by your medical doctor. ASCIA Action Plans must be completed by a doctor and are available from the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources/ascia-action-plan-for-anaphylaxis

Living with your food allergy
As there is currently no cure for food allergy, strict avoidance is essential in the management of food allergy. It is important for individuals with food allergy to:

Carry their adrenaline (epinephrine) autoinjector (if prescribed) and ASCIA Action Plan with them at all times;
Know the signs and symptoms of mild to moderate and severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) and what to do when a reaction occurs;
Read and understand food labels for food allergy;
Tell wait staff that they have a food allergy when eating out;
Be aware of cross contamination of food allergens when preparing food.
Food allergy can be effectively managed
The good news is that people with food allergy can learn to live with their condition with the guidance of their clinical immunology/allergy specialist and a network of supportive contacts. Having an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and adrenaline autoinjector offers reassurance, but this is not a substitute for strategies to minimise the risk of exposure.

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (www.allergyfacts.org.au/) and Allergy New Zealand (www.allergy.org.nz) are community support organisations that offer valuable updates and tips for living with food allergies.

Further information on food allergy and anaphylaxis is provided on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy
www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources

First Aid Kit and First Aid Course

September 7th, 2018

As well as knowing some basic first aid techniques, it is important that households and workplaces have a first aid kit that meets their needs and is well organised, fully stocked and readily available at all times.

The contents should be appropriate to cope with a range of emergency situations, depending on the setting. It’s a good idea to have a number of kits handy in different places, such as in the home, car or office.

First aid kits are available for purchase from a variety of providers, including Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 or your local pharmacy. Specialty kits are also available to meet specific needs.

Simple Instruction is your local Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR training provider. We conduct accredited training courses out of the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) which are very popular. Centrally located on the Northern Beaches of Sydney the training courses are the HLTAID003 Provide First Aid Course, HLKTAID001 Provide CPR and HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting.

Please book with www.simpleinstruction.com.au or www.northshorefirstaid.com.au

First Aid Techniques – HLTAID003 Provide First Aid

August 26th, 2018

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

It is a good idea to take a first aid course so that you can recognise an emergency and give basic first aid until professional help arrives.
Learn the first aid method of DRSABCD
First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan.

DRSABCD stands for:
Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.
Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?
Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.
Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?
If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.
If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.
Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) – if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin. Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds. The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.
Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations. An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself. The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

Book a first aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on the Northern Beaches with courses conducted at the Dee Why RSL. HLTAID003 Provide first aid is our most popular first aid course and the HLTAID004 Child Care first aid course for anyone in the child care industry under ACECQA. The HLTAID001 Provide CPR is a great refresher training course for those looking top update their skills.All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and the accredited and preferred supplier on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All training course participants will receive a free manual, free chart and free CPR face shield.

Asthma and Anaphylaxis Course – HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

June 11th, 2018

Northern Beaches HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting training course is available at the Dee Why RSL weekly. This course is ideal for Child Care workers and anyone in the child services industry. Simple Instruction offers online easy of use training before sitting the course. Please contact our team for HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and HLTAID001 Provide CPR certified and Nationally Recognised Training courses.

Who uses an EpiPen?
EpiPens are first aid treatment for anaphylaxis, a potentially life threatening allergic reaction that affects a person’s breathing and blood pressure.

EpiPens deliver a single shot of adrenaline to reverse the symptoms of anaphylaxis. Allergy sufferers who experience an anaphylactic allergic reaction need to call an ambulance immediately and go to hospital, both for further treatment and to be under observation for at least four hours.

Why is there a shortage?
Australian supplier Mylan says the US manufacturer Pfizer is responsible for the supply shortage. Pfizer puts the delay down to a problem with the autoinjector’s components – one that’s caused production delays for months.

Pfizer tells CHOICE the shortage has to do with a third-party component, as well as changes made to its manufacturing facility. “At this time, we cannot commit to a specific time for when the supply constraint will be fully resolved,” a spokesperson says.

The company is advising people to fill their prescriptions closer to expiration dates to help them manage EpiPen supply over the next few months.

What happens if I have an attack?
If you don’t have an EpiPen on hand, immediately call 000 – or better yet, have someone with you make the call.

Follow your ASCIA action plan that you’ve developed with your doctor, and either sit or lay down on the ground with your feet outstretched in front of you. Don’t stand up or sit on a chair, as this could cause a sudden drop in blood pressure.

If you’re having a severe allergic reaction, Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia recommends that you follow your ASCIA action plan:

sit or lie down on the ground
use the EpiPen on your outer mid-thigh
call for an ambulance
(if the symptoms persist and it’s needed) take a second EpiPen five minutes after the first.
You’ll need to go to hospital for further treatment and remain under observation for at least four hours.

Can I use an expired EpiPen?
Most allergy sufferers will have an EpiPen on hand, even if it’s an expired one.

EpiPens have a one- to two-year shelf life before they expire. It’s not ideal, but consumer allergy groups and pharmacists recommend people use their expired EpiPens if necessary during the shortage.

These adrenaline autoinjectors do become less effective over time, but the consensus is an expired EpiPen is better than not having one to use at the time of an attack.

If all of your EpiPens have expired, use the most recent one. Be sure to check the expiration date on the EpiPen itself and not on the box as they may differ.

You can gauge the quality of an EpiPen by checking the clear window near its tip. The adrenaline should be transparent – free from sediment and discolouration – for it to be most effective.

How long do I have to wait for a replacement EpiPen?
After leaving your prescription with a pharmacist, it takes between a couple of days to two weeks for an EpiPen to arrive.

The pharmacists we spoke to say they haven’t had EpiPens in stock for months. Before the shortage, pharmacies would typically stock two EpiPens at any time, with replacement stock being delivered daily.

The shortage has been going on for how long?
The government’s Therapeutics Goods Administration (TGA) says EpiPens have been in short supply since January 2018.

Initially orders were not being fulfilled at all, forcing people to visit different pharmacies in the hope they could find untapped stock. Supply has marginally improved, with an ordering system delivering EpiPens to the people who need an EpiPen the most.

Has the shortage been linked to any deaths or serious injuries?
The shortage has not been linked to any deaths or serious injuries in Australia, a Department of Health spokesperson told CHOICE.

We asked manufacturer Pfizer if it has contributed to any deaths or injuries globally, but the company chose not to address the question.

Can I reuse an EpiPen?

EpiPens can only be used once – even if there’s some adrenaline still in the device. After use, they should be placed in a container, marked with the time it was administered and handed over to ambulance staff.

Does the shortage affect EpiPen Junior autoinjectors?
EpiPen Junior autoinjectors are not experiencing a stock shortage.

Are there any alternatives to an EpiPen?
We’re one of the few countries that don’t have an alternative adrenaline autoinjector, along with Canada, which makes us more vulnerable to the ongoing shortage as people don’t have a substitute.

Northern Beaches First Aid – HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting

March 2nd, 2018

The Northern Beaches community should feel very safe with most child care centers meeting the National Quality standard. With the current figure at 77% and growing year on year, we must make sure our children and families feel safe and the staff have the appropriate training.

If you are a current child care educator or TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care student make sure you book into one of our HLTAID004 Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting training courses today. We are located at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney, and conduct courses on a regular basis. We offer a variety of training courses including HLTAID001 Provide CPR – $55, HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – $110 and our tailor HLTAID004 Childcare First Aid training course which includes asthma and anaphylaxis training – $140. Don’t miss out on the cheapest price for first aid training on the Northern Beaches.

https://www.acecqa.gov.au/latest-news/more-three-quarters-education-and-care-services-rated-meeting-national-quality-standard

Thursday, 8 February 2018
ACECQA today announced that 94% of all children’s education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework (NQF) have received a quality rating, with 77% rated at ‘Meeting National Quality Standard’ (NQS) or above (as at 31 December 2017).

“In the last five years, the proportion of services rated at ‘Meeting NQS’ or above has risen from 59% to 65%, 69%, 72% and now 77%”, said ACECQA CEO Gabrielle Sinclair.

“Continuous quality improvement is one of the core objectives of the National Quality Framework. It is very pleasing to see this year-on-year improvement in service quality”, added Ms Sinclair.

Key findings from ACECQA’s NQF Snapshot include:

94% (14,687) of approved education and care services have a quality rating
77% (11,253) of rated services have an overall quality rating of ‘Meeting NQS’ or above
40% (1373) of services rated at ‘Working Towards NQS’ do not meet five or fewer of the 58 elements of quality
3776 quality rating reassessments have been completed
Of the 2700 reassessments of services rated ‘Working Towards NQS’, 68% (1827) resulted in a higher overall quality rating.
The findings are published in full on the ACECQA website: acecqa.gov.au/nqf/snapshots

On 1 February 2018, a revised version of the NQS came into effect, which reduced the number of standards from 18 to 15, and the number of elements from 58 to 40. All education and care services will be quality assessed and rated against the revised NQS from 1 February onwards.

Parents and carers are encouraged to visit Starting Blocks for more information about their local education and care services.

Education and care services approved under the National Quality Framework include long day care, outside school hours care and family day care services, as well as most preschools/kindergartens.

All course offered under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

First Aid and CPR Training Classes Near Me!

January 30th, 2018

Sydney’s Northern Beaches is a popular location due to its beautiful beaches. With summer in full swing and with school classes returning to normality its time to be trained in first aid and CPR. Simple Instruction conducts HLTAID003 Provide First Aid, Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting (HLTAID004) and HLTAID001 Provide CPR at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney or we provide private classes and can come to your workplace or house. We have been a part of the Northern Beaches community for the last nine years and enjoy being near our clients.

Book a first aid or CPR course online through our website www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

First Aid skills used on Child left in a hot car!

January 7th, 2018

First Aid and CPR Training on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. Training Rooms in the Dee Why RSL. Free Provide First Aid Manual and CPR face Mask. Allen’s Training First Aid online App access.

WOMAN was outraged after finding a baby crying and sweating in a parked car, but the dad’s reaction really made her see red.

Emma Russell, NZ Herald
news.com.auJANUARY 7, 20186:34AM
Have you ever left your child in the car?
A WOMAN is outraged after finding a four-month-old baby “cooking” in a parked car in Whanganui, New Zealand on Wednesday.

Margi Keys said there was something distressing about the baby’s crying that prompted her to investigate, the New Zealand Herald reports.

To her horror she found the crying baby red and sweating in a car she described as a furnace.

“There were heaps of people around but no one took any notice. I started calling out asking whose baby it was and eventually a man in his 20s waved at me but didn’t come over to the car,” she said.

The incident occurred around midday when the outside temperature peaked at 25C and there was no wind.

Ms Keys said the baby looked extremely uncomfortable so she slid open the back door unclipped the seatbelt from his car seat and gently pulled him out.

“As soon as he was out of the car and in my arms, he stopped crying.”

Police say that young children must never be left alone in a house or vehicle and they require constant supervision.

The parent of the child didn’t appear to realise how dangerous leaving a child in a car was, according to Ms Keys. Picture: iStock
The parent of the child didn’t appear to realise how dangerous leaving a child in a car was, according to Ms Keys. Picture: iStockSource:Supplied

It is illegal to leave a child under the age of 14 without reasonable provision for their care.

Ms Keys said she couldn’t believe with all the publicity about the danger of leaving a child in a hot car that it still happens.

“Heatstroke can happen in two minutes. Brain damage can occur. Death is then not far away.”

In 2015 a 16-month-old baby died after being left in a car outside of the mothers Whanganui workplace.

Ms Keys said she approached the man and told him that the baby was very hot and distressed and about the dangers of leaving a baby in a hot car.

“He protested that he’d ‘only been gone two minutes’ and that ‘he was asleep’ when he parked the car.”

She said the man didn’t seem that concerned and told her that the baby usually cries and it was normal.

“I said to him that most babies need to be held a lot, they need to feel secure, and being held and soothed helps them to have that sense of security.”

But Ms Keys said even though the man agreed not to do it again, she was unsure he understood how dangerous it was.

“If you are at the beach and you see a child distressed in the water you go to save them, the same principle should apply to a baby left in a car.”

This article was originally published by the New Zealand Herald and appears here with permission.

2018 First Aid and CPR courses – Northern Beaches, Sydney

January 4th, 2018

Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training courses are back for January and February 2018. With a new year we think its time that we try and get everyone trained in the basics of first aid or CPR. Simple Instruction is a local Northern Beaches, Sydney First Aid provider for all workplaces, industries and safety requirements. Course are available at the Dee Why RSL and caters for people in suburbs across the Manly Warringah region.

Listed below are the 5 top reasons why first aid or CPR training is so important.

• Increases safety: The basis of first aid or CPR training is “prevention”. It is always better to be safe than to be sorry. Knowledge of first aid or CPR promotes the sense of safety and well being amongst people, prompting them to be more alert and safe in the surroundings they dwell in. Awareness and desire to be accident free keeps you more safe and secure, reducing the number of causalities and accidents.

• Helps save lives: If a person who is trained to give first aid administration happens to see any casualty in his vicinity, immediate action can be taken and lives be saved. While it is natural for most of us to rush to support any injured person, a trained person is more reliable, confident and in control of himself and his actions while in trauma situations.

• Helps relieve pain: Some injuries require a very simple solution like applying ice pack or a quick rub. A ride to the emergency room is not necessary, at least not for some time. In such cases, calling a person trained in first aid courses is more reliable. They can help reduce the pain by performing simple procedures and can help relieve pain at least temporarily.

• Makes people more secure: Knowing that you can save your own life when required, or that of the people you know or those in trauma during some emergency helps you relax more and be more secure. The sense of security promotes a healthy and a more confident environment around you where you and the people around you would feel more secure. The presence of such people provides reassurance to the others in the situation.

• Prevents the situation from becoming worse: A trained person would know how to keep the situation from becoming bad to worse. They will provide temporary treatment which will keep the condition of the victim from deteriorating, till professional help arrives. Something is better than nothing!

Knowledge of first aid and CPR training promotes a healthy, secure and a safer environment, and instills confidence amongst people, their families, their colleagues and associates thus making the Northern Beaches, Sydney a safer place. Basic first aid or CPR knowledge is very helpful in dealing with trauma situations. Not just the medical help they provide, but the confidence they exhibit is very helpful during casualties. Being trained to provide first aid is useful to oneself and society.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

January First Aid and CPR Courses

January 3rd, 2018

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR accredited training course are continuing throughout January and February 2018 with Simple Instruction conducting courses out of the Dee Why RSL. The courses are filling fast as participants are coming to the Northern Beaches from all over Sydney.

We cater to not only locals on the Northern Beaches from Palm Beach and Newport to Manly, Dee Why and Belrose but to all of Sydney with people coming form the CBD, North Shore, Chatswood, Bondi and the Central Coast. With First aid and CPR courses essential for most jobs and careers its essential we cater for individuals as they make their New Years resolutions which include Career changes.

Training course we have on offer include:
HLTAID001 – Provide CPR
HLTAID003 – Provide First Aid (Senior/Apply First Aid)
HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting (Childcare First Aid)
CPCCWHS1001 – (Online White Card) Prepare to work safely in the construction industry with Live Assessment.
www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au
All course are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909

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