Archive for the ‘Dee Why’ category

First Aid Training course on the Northern Beaches Sydney.

September 30th, 2019

First Aid and CPR Training course are available throughout October and November for the Northern Beaches community. Simple Instruction conducts accreddited training courses out of the transforming Dee Why RSL.

Simple Instruction is CPR friendly and welcomes those just wanting to update the CPR components. We have short Provide CPR HLTAID001 refresher courses that take 2 hours to complete and with minimal online effort.

First Aid training courses have never been so Simple! We conduct the Provide First Aid HLTAID003 training course which takes 5.5 hours and covers the general first aid course components (previously senior first aid). The childcare specific first aid is the Provide an Emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 which also covers the Asthma and Anaphylaxis needed in a child care setting.

With course dates available every 3 to 4 days it makes Simple Instruction the number 1 course provider in the Northern Beaches and Sydney. We encourage all Northern Beaches residents to book a first aid or CPR course at the Dee Why RSL as we give back to the local schools and provide training courses at cost price.

Please make a booking online www.simpleinstruction.com.au – Training and Assessment delivered on behalf of Allen’s Training pty ltd RTO 90909.

First aid course Northern Beaches

July 18th, 2019

First aid courses are available for July, August and September on the Northern Beaches, Sydney. First aid courses are hosted by the Dee Why RSL (www.deewhyrsl.com.au). Simple Instruction is your leading first aid and CPR course specialist.

Courses available include:

Private first aid courses are also available for your workplace or business and we are happy to tailor courses to suit your needs.

*Please remember that your first aid qualifications last for 3 years and your CPR certificate last for 1 year. It is recommended that everyone updates their accreditation and first aid skills every year. Book online through www.simpleinstruction.com.au

First aid event today on the Northern Beaches, Sydney

July 16th, 2019

Simple Instruction has just posted all first aid and CPR dates that are being conducted at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches, Sydney to the @Simpleinstruction Facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/Simpleinstruction

The events are booking out fast and are available online through the PayPal payment protal on the website www.simpleinstruction.com.au Provide First Aid HLTAID003 is $125 which is the cheapest on the Northern Beaches, Provide CPR HLTAID001 is $60 and is quick and easy to complete and the
Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for child care workers caters to their needs in the child care industry and ACECQA.

All training is accredited and are courses conducted by Simple Instruction do so under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

HLTAID003 Provide First Aid Course (previously Senior First Aid) on the Northern Beaches

July 12th, 2019

The HLTAID003 Provide First Aid course is available on the Northern Beaches through Simple Instruction. The Provide First Aid course (previously Senior First Aid) is accredited across all states and territories across Sydney and Australia.

The training course is a requirement for most job applications and must stay updated for insurance and safety requirements in most workplaces, other than the child care industry. The HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting is a requirement for child care providers and workers and must be updated every 3 years.

Simple Instruction also offers the HLTAID001 Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR and it is a requirement to stay updated every year in the majority of industries. The HLTAID001 CPR course is also a competency of the HLTAID003 and HLTAID004 training course packages.

All recognised first aid and CPR certificates are delivered on the Northern Beaches. The public courses are held at the Dee Why RSL and private courses can be held at your workplace or offices. Courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Please make a booking online via the website to secure your place in the course. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

First Aid and CPR Certificate Northern Beaches Sydney

July 9th, 2019

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Training is provided by Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney. We provide accredited certificates via online email within 2/3 business days and training is conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003 (Formerly Senior First Aid), Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an Emergency First Aid response in an Education and Care setting HLTAID004 for both public courses at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney, NSW and private courses at your workplace or business.

What sets our First Aid or CPR courses a part from St John’s or Red Cross? Simple Instruction has local Northern Beaches trainers and knows what is required to deliver a fun, easy, interactive and educational training experience. Simple Instruction’s courses are cheaper than our competitors, we have free online training and we have free parking available at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney, NSW.

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Training Courses

July 1st, 2019

Based on the Northern Beaches of Sydney at the Dee Why RSL, Simple Instruction is the leading first aid and CPR training course provider. Dee Why RSL is centrally located in the middle of the Northern Beaches and is accessible via the B Line, car and has ample parking available. Simple Instruction First Aid and CPR training has over 67 – 5 star google reviews and has a proven to the Northern Beaches community that we are the leader in the first aid and CPR training.

Simple Instruction offers training courses: Provide First Aid HLTAID003, Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an Emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004. All course dates are available and are in high demand. We do have an online first aid component before sitting the course.

December and January 2019 First aid and CPR training courses

November 22nd, 2018

The Northern Beaches leading first aid and CPR training company is offering a larger number of courses for December 2018 and January 2019. Our most popular certificates include the HLTAID003 Provide First Aid Course (formerly senior first aid or apply first aid), HLTAID001 Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting. All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allens Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 and are nationally recognised.

Simple Instruction conducts training courses at the Dee Why RSL (DYRSL) offering both day and evening courses. Our courses are popular with Fitness trainers, Personal Trainers, construction workers and the childcare industry.

Book online with Simple Instruction today. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Belrose, Avalon, Brookvale, Balgowlah, Cammeray, Chatswood, collaroy, Cremorne, Cromer, Crows Nest, Frenchs Forest, Freshwater, Manly, Mona Vale, Mosman, Naremburn, Narrabeen, Newport, North Sydney, North Shore, Palm Beach

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Course

November 19th, 2018

First Aid and CPR Training courses located on the Northern Beaches. Simple Instruction conducts HLTAID003 Provide First Aid, HLTAID001 Provide CPR and HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting (childcare first aid) training courses at the Dee Why RSL which is the centre of the Northern Beaches of Sydney.

Accredited and nationally recognised training courses with certification are our speciality and our Northern Beaches community has responded with 5 star Google reviews and positive feedback from all our training courses. Travelling from Mona Vale or even from the Sydney CBD is easy on the B Line with many people coming from all over Sydney. Many people travel from Manly, Brookvale, Belrose, Balgowlah, Narrabeen, Cammeray, North Sydney, Mosman, Seaforth and from all over the Northern Beaches and North Shore with easy parking at the Dee Why RSL.

Book online now for the easiest, cheapest and best First Aid and CPR experience. Apply your first aid knoweldge. www.simpleinstruction.com.au

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allens Training RTO 90909

Certificate III in Childcare – HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting

October 23rd, 2018

Providing First Aid and CPR certificates for the childcare industry on the Northern Beaches is our pleasure. The HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting is for Certificate III students to complete their Childcare course. Book in online today to secure your spot in a first aid or CPR course at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches.

Food allergy occurs in around 1 in 20 children and in about 2 in 100 adults. The most common triggers are egg, cow’s milk, peanut, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy, fish and wheat. The majority of food allergies in children are not severe, and may be ‘outgrown’ with time. However, peanut, tree nut, seed and seafood allergies are less likely to be outgrown and tend to be lifelong allergies. Some food allergies can be severe, causing life-threatening reactions known as anaphylaxis.

What is allergy?
An allergy is when the immune system reacts to a substance (allergen) in the environment which is usually harmless (e.g. food, pollen, animal dander and dust mite) or bites, stings and medications. This results in the production of allergy antibodies which are proteins in the immune system which identify and react with foreign substances.

An allergic reaction is when someone develops symptoms following exposure to an allergen, such as hives, swelling of the lips, eyes or face, vomiting or wheeze. It is important to note that only some people with allergy antibodies will develop symptoms following exposure to the allergen, hence confirmation of allergy by a clinical immunology/allergy specialist is required.

Allergic reactions range from mild to severe. Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction.

Symptoms of food allergy
Mild to moderate symptoms of food allergy include:

Swelling of face, lips and/or eyes
Hives or welts on the skin
Abdominal pain, vomiting
Signs of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to foods include:

Difficult/noisy breathing
Swelling of tongue
Swelling/tightness in throat
Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice
Wheeze or persistent cough
Persistent dizziness and/or collapse
Pale and floppy (in young children)
Food allergy can sometimes be dangerous
Although Mild, moderate and even severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to foods are common in Australia and New Zealand. However, deaths from anaphylaxis due to food allergy are rare in Australia and New Zealand. Most deaths can be prevented by careful allergen avoidance measures and immediate administration of an adrenaline autoinjector.

The most common foods causing life-threatening anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and egg. Symptoms of anaphylaxis affect our breathing and/or our heart.

Sometimes food allergy may be less obvious
Less common symptoms of food allergy include infantile colic, reflux of stomach contents, eczema, chronic diarrhoea and failure to thrive in infants.

Not all adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy
The term allergy is often misused to describe any adverse reaction to foods which results in annoying (but ultimately harmless) symptoms such as headaches after overindulging in chocolate or red wine, or bloating after drinking a milkshake or eating too much pasta. While these reactions are not allergic, the result is a widespread impression that all adverse reactions to foods are trivial.

Adverse reactions to foods that are not allergy include food intolerances, toxic reactions, food poisoning, enzyme deficiencies, food aversion or irritation from skin contact with certain foods. These adverse reactions are often mistaken for food allergy.

How common is food allergy and is it increasing?
Studies have shown that food allergy affects 10% of children up to 1 year of age; between 4-8% of children aged up to 5 years of age and approximately 2% of adults.

Hospital admissions for severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have doubled over the last decade in Australia, USA and UK. In Australia, admissions for anaphylaxis due to food allergy in children aged 0 to 4 years are even higher, having increased five-fold over the same period.

Why the rise in food allergy?
We currently do not have clear information as to why food allergy seems to have increased so rapidly in recent years, particularly in young children. This area requires additional research studies, several of which are already underway.

Proposed explanations (which have not yet been proven in studies) include:

Hygiene hypothesis, which proposes that less exposure to infections in early childhood, is associated with an increased risk of allergy. A more recent version of the hygiene hypothesis proposes that the make-up and type of the micro-organisms to which the mother, baby and infant is exposed and colonised with may alter allergic risk.
Delayed introduction of allergenic foods such as egg, peanut or tree nuts.
Methods of food processing, such as roasted versus boiled peanuts.
Development of allergy to food by skin exposure such as the use of unrefined nut oil based moisturisers.
These areas require additional research studies, several of which are underway.

Allergies to cow’s milk, eggs and peanuts are the most common in children
Nine foods cause 90% of food allergic reactions, including cow’s milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, sesame, soy, fish, shellfish and wheat. Peanut, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, sesame and egg are the most common food allergens in older children and adults. Other triggers such as herbal medicines, fruits and vegetables have been described and almost any food can cause an allergic reaction.

When does food allergy develop?
Food allergy can develop at any age, but is most common in young children aged less than 5 years. Even young babies can develop symptoms of food allergy.

Reliable diagnosis of food allergy is important
Your doctor will normally ask a series of questions that may help to narrow down the list of likely causes such as foods or medicines consumed that day, or exposure to stinging insects. This approach will also help to exclude conditions that can sometimes be confused with food allergy and anaphylaxis.
Skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests help to confirm or exclude potential triggers. Sometimes a temporary elimination diet under close medical and dietetic supervision will be needed, followed by food challenges to identify the cause. Long term unsupervised restricted diets should not be undertaken, as this can lead to malnutrition and other complications such as food aversion.

While the results of allergy testing are a useful guide in determining whether the person is allergic, they do not provide a reliable guide to whether the reaction will be mild or severe. Information on allergy tests is available on the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/allergy-testing

Food allergy does not run in the family
Most of the time, children with food allergy do not have parents with food allergy. However, if a family has one child with food allergy, their brothers and sisters are at a slightly higher risk of having food allergy themselves, although that risk is still relatively low.

Some parents want to have their other children screened for food allergy. If the test is negative, that may be reassuring, but does not mean that the other child will never develop an allergy in the future. If their screening test is positive, it is not always clear whether it definitely represents allergy. In this situation, a food challenge (under medical supervision) may be required to confirm the allergy.

A positive allergy test is not the same as being food allergic
It is important to know that a positive skin prick allergy test or allergy blood test means that the body’s immune system has produced a response to a food, but sometimes these are false positives. In other words, the test may be positive yet the person can actually eat the food without any symptoms. For this reason, it is important to confirm the significance of a positive allergy test (in some circumstances) with a supervised food challenge. In a child with a positive test of uncertain meaning, this is often done around school entry age under medical supervision. Interpretation of test results (and whether challenge should be undertaken) should be discussed with your doctor.

Unorthodox so called allergy tests are unproven
There are several methods of unorthodox so called tests for food allergy. Examples include cytotoxic food testing, Vega testing, kinesiology, allergy elimination techniques, iridology, pulse testing, Alcat testing, Rinkel’s intradermal skin testing, reflexology, hair analysis and IgG food antibody testing. These have no scientific basis, are unreliable and have no useful role in the assessment of allergy. These techniques have not been shown to be reliable or reproducible when subjected to formal study. ASCIA advises against the use of these tests for diagnosis or to guide medical treatment. No Medicare rebate is available in Australia for these tests, and their use is also not supported in New Zealand.

Adverse consequences may also arise from unorthodox testing and treatments. Treatment based on inaccurate, false positive or clinically irrelevant results is not only misleading, but can lead to ineffective and at times expensive treatments, and delay more effective therapy. Sometimes harmful therapy may result, such as unnecessary dietary avoidance and risk of malnutrition, particularly in children. Information on these methods is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/unorthodox-testing-and-treatment

Most children grow out of their food allergy
Most children allergic to cow’s milk, soy, wheat or egg will ‘outgrow’ their food allergy. By contrast, allergic reactions to peanut, tree nuts, sesame and seafood persist in the majority (~ 75%) of children affected. When food allergy develops for the first time in adults, it usually persists.

Allergic reactions may be mild, moderate or severe, and can be influenced by a number of factors
These factors include:

the severity of the allergy
the amount eaten
the form of the food (liquid may sometimes be absorbed faster)
whether it is eaten on its own or mixed in with other foods
exercise around the same time as the meal, as this may worsen severity
whether the food is cooked, as cooked food is sometimes better tolerated
the presence or absence of asthma
menstrual cycle in females
intake of alcohol
Can food allergies be prevented?
Information about allergy prevention is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention

Research into food allergy is ongoing
The increased frequency of food allergy is driving research into areas such as prevention, treatment and why it has become more common. Current areas of research include allergen immunotherapy (also referred to as desensitisation) to switch off the allergy once it has developed. Initial results are encouraging but it is not yet ready for routine clinical use. Research continues to explore new ways of more effectively treating this condition.

ASCIA Action Plans are essential
Many people with food allergies will have an accidental exposure every few years, even when they are very careful to avoid the foods they are allergic to. The difficulties of avoiding some foods completely make it essential to have an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis if an adrenaline autoinjector has been prescribed.

For those who are not thought to be at high risk of anaphylaxis and therefore have not been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector, an ASCIA Action Plan for Allergic Reactions should be completed and provided by your medical doctor. ASCIA Action Plans must be completed by a doctor and are available from the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources/ascia-action-plan-for-anaphylaxis

Living with your food allergy
As there is currently no cure for food allergy, strict avoidance is essential in the management of food allergy. It is important for individuals with food allergy to:

Carry their adrenaline (epinephrine) autoinjector (if prescribed) and ASCIA Action Plan with them at all times;
Know the signs and symptoms of mild to moderate and severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) and what to do when a reaction occurs;
Read and understand food labels for food allergy;
Tell wait staff that they have a food allergy when eating out;
Be aware of cross contamination of food allergens when preparing food.
Food allergy can be effectively managed
The good news is that people with food allergy can learn to live with their condition with the guidance of their clinical immunology/allergy specialist and a network of supportive contacts. Having an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and adrenaline autoinjector offers reassurance, but this is not a substitute for strategies to minimise the risk of exposure.

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (www.allergyfacts.org.au/) and Allergy New Zealand (www.allergy.org.nz) are community support organisations that offer valuable updates and tips for living with food allergies.

Further information on food allergy and anaphylaxis is provided on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy
www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources

First Aid Certificate required in the industry. HLTAID004, HLTAID003, HLTAID001 available

October 6th, 2018

First Aid certificates are required in all Northern Beaches workplaces. Are you covered by insurance? Have your employees updated their CPR training and certificates?

Simple Instruction offers accredited HLTAID003 Provide First Aid and Provide CPR HLTAID001 training courses at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Book in to update your training certificate and qualifications in October and November.

The 4 Workplace First Aid statistics that you need
to know
1. Only 13% of employers are compliant with the First Aid national code of practice
(This code of practice requires employers to implement training for first aiders, first aid procedures and have
sufficient first aid kits and signage)
2. Over 65% of employers are unaware of their obligations under the First Aid code of practice
3. Only 31% of Australian workers feel confident in how to response to a workplace first aid emergency
4. Less than 50% of workplaces offer First Aid training to their employees
The statistics above paint a picture that illustrates Australian workplaces aren’t adequately prepared for First Aid emergencies
in the workplace. Further the majority of Australian employers are unaware of their requirements under the national code
of practice.
First Aid training is one of the best control measures to ensure that your workplace is adequately prepared for first aid
emergencies that may occur at work. First Aid training must be relevant to the industry and workplace to ensure that it is well
accepted by all course participants.
Our First Aid research found that:
• Employers should ensure an accurate first aid training register is maintained and regularly reviewed to ensure
compliance with the code of practice
• The majority of workplaces are ill prepared to effectively deal with an incident at work
• First Aid training improves the confidence of workers to respond to an on-site First Aid emergency
If you want to substantially reduce the risk of your workers not knowing what to do during a First Aid emergency, you should
consider a 4 point approach to First Aid safety and compliance:
1. Offer first aid training to all interested staff and ensure that adequate numbers of people are trained to act as First
Aiders and a First Aid register is kept up to date
2. First Aid response procedures are written and kept up to date as a protection for First Aiders at work and as protection
for the employer
3. Adequate First Aid kits and signage is in place according with the code of practise
4. Regular emergency response drills should be conducted to ensure that you are prepared for any eventuality
Summary:
This paper is an educational tool to give you the knowledge and skills to decide on the most appropriate First Aid safety
measures for your workplace. I hope you read this document and this helps you in making an informed decision to reduce
the likelihood of workers not knowing how to respond to a First Aid incident your workplace. We wish you the very best with
your workplace safety and we hope that this tool helps you to understand some of the research from within this field.

All courses through Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909. Find us online www.simpleinstruction.com.au

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