Archive for the ‘Posions’ category

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

Northern Beaches Hospital – Mona Vale Tick First Aid

November 5th, 2017

IN a world first, a northern beaches hospital has conducted research into the safest way to remove a tick.

First Aid for Tick removal provided in Simple Instruction First Aid training courses at the Dee Why RSL.

Dr Andy Ratchford, emergency director at Mona Vale Hospital who was involved in the study, said results showed killing the tick by freezing it while it was still embedded in the skin was the best course of action and could potentially save a life.

He said the research proves it was safer than using other methods such as pulling it out while still alive with tweezers or your fingertips.

“In general, we found that four out of five people who removed the ticks without killing them first suffered an allergic reaction, mostly it was a local reaction, but in some cases it was life-threatening,” Dr Ratchford said.

He said in comparison, only one out of ten patients who killed ticks in place by freezing them first, suffered a reaction.

“Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal. If you can remove the tick and decrease your chances of getting a reaction then that is important,” Dr Ratchford said.

Dr Ratchford said the advice was critical for those living on the northern beaches which was a known tick hotspot.

He said at Mona Vale Hospital they were seeing a year-on-year rise in tick related emergencies.

As well as dealing with minor reactions to tick bites, they were also seeing patients with cellulitis, tick typhus and those with life-threatening anaphylaxis caused by an allergy to a tick or to meat, brought on by a tick bite.

Allergy expert professor Sheryl van Nunen, who first linked ticks to meat allergies, estimates that more than 1000 people on the northern beaches have developed a meat allergy caused by a tick bite, while others have developed an allergy to ticks themselves.

Last December an Avalon dad told the Manly Daily how he was left fearing for his life when his throat started to close up and his eyes and tongue turned black, after his wife pulled out a tick in his neck with her fingertips.

Mona Vale doctors had to give 53-year-old wool trader Michael Kiernan three emergency shots of adrenaline to help him breathe in the terrifying ordeal. Despite being bitten many times by ticks, he had never had a reaction before. Now he has to carry an lifesaving Epipen in case he gets another tick.

Michael Kiernan was left fearing for his life after a tick bite turned his eyes and tongue black.
Dr Ratchford said they saw most of their tick patients between July and December, as that was when the adult female needs its last blood meal before producing offspring.

He said during this period around two per cent of all cases at Mona Vale’s emergency department were tick-related, which was high.

The study looked at 124 patients between July and December in 2016. He said that didn’t include everyone who came to emergency with a tick bite, but a large sample of patients with tick issues.

Dr Ratchford said those on the frontline of tick emergencies had been advising people to freeze not squeeze ticks for some time.

One of the ticks removed from patients at Mona Vale Hospital. Picture: Adam Yip
However, without research to back it up health authorities have been reluctant to promote the method.

“There’s so much conflicting evidence out there on how to remove ticks, it’s a minefield,” he said.

“This is the first research looking at the best way to remove ticks.”

He said he would be submitting his research to journals in the hope of getting the information out there.

HOW TO REMOVE A TICK:
1. For adult ticks, use a freezing agent, containing ether, such as WART-Off. Apply five presses of the treatment half a centimetre above the tick and wait for the tick to fall off. If it doesn’t, reapply. Seek medical help if a tick, dead or alive, doesn’t drop off.

2. For tiny ticks, such as larvae and nymphs, use a permethrin-based cream such as Lyeclear. Leave on for one to three hours and they should fall off.

3. For more information on how to prevent and remove ticks go to tiara.org.au.

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

Calling an Ambulance

October 18th, 2010

What is a medical emergency?
Always call triple zero (000) for an ambulance in the following circumstances. If you are unsure the operators will talk you through any situation.

  • Unconscious person – who doesn’t wake or respond when shaken.
  • Heart attack (suspected) – pain in the chest, especially if it is crushing or like indigestion and lasts more than five minutes. The pain may spread to arms and jaw.
  • Breathing difficulty – especially if the person is unable to speak more than a few words or has blue lips or mouth.
  • Abdominal pain – that is severe and undiagnosed.
  • Haemorrhages – major uncontrolled bleeding.
  • Bleeding – that does not stop after at least 10 minutes of continuous pressure.
  • Back pain (severe) – after a fall or after sudden onset of back pain if over 50 years of age.
  • Burns – which are bigger than the size of a hand and/or cause severe pain that is not relieved with simple painkillers, or if the person has difficulty breathing.
  • Choking – especially if the person is unable to talk, cry or breathe.
  • Convulsions or fitting – if the person is still fitting as you phone triple zero (000) or if they have no history of convulsions (for example epilepsy or brain injury).
  • Drowning, near drowning, diving or scuba accident.
  • Stroke (possible) – especially if the person experiences numbness, loss of function of hand, arm or leg, slurred speech, facial droop or severe abrupt headache.
  • Headache (severe) – not the usual kind, with or without loss of function of arm or leg.
  • Motor vehicle accidents – if you think someone has been injured.
  • Industrial accidents – where a person is injured or trapped.
  • Vaginal bleeding (severe) – with possible or confirmed pregnancy.
  • Suicide attempt.
  • Pain (severe) after a fall or injury – when the person is unable to sit up, stand or walk.
  • Drug overdose or poisoning – whether you know for sure or just suspect an overdose.
  • Diabetes – if the person is not fully awake or not behaving normally.
  • Allergic reaction – especially with difficulty breathing or loss of consciousness.
  • Electrical shock – of any kind.
  • Trauma (injury) – which is severe, especially to the head, neck, chest or abdomen – for example if the person was stabbed, shot or impaled, or hit by or ran into an object.
  • Meningococcal disease – if symptoms indicate possible infection.
  • Hypothermia or heat stress – which is severe.

First aid courses
It is strongly recommended that you take a first aid course, so you can recognise a medical emergency and administer first aid until the ambulance paramedics arrive to take over. Your quick and effective action could mean the difference between life and death for the injured person. For more information on first aid or CPR courses please contact Ian at Simple Instruction by using the contact us section to the right of the page. Or alternatively email or call ; [email protected] or 0411 557 405.

Simple Instruction’s next course will be conducted at the Brookvale Hotel / Pub on Saturday the 20th of November 2010. All are welcome and I look forward to seeing you on the day.

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