Posts Tagged ‘Red Cross’

Northern Beaches NOT trained in First Aid

August 2nd, 2019

FEWER than 5 per cent of Australians are qualified in first aid, sparking an urgent call from emergency services for people to update their skills and save a life.

Red Cross data released yesterday revealed Australia had one of the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world.

Parents were among those singled out as Red Cross ­trainer Janie McCullagh said first-aid skills could save the life of a loved one. “It can be the difference between life and death,” Ms McCullagh said.

“Our program is popular with pregnant ladies and their partners, they come along to learn what to do even before they have children. I think it would be appropriate for all adults to learn whether they are starting a family or not.”

First-aid training helped Seaforth mum Susie Campbell save two lives, including her young son Thomas when he was a baby.

The 43-year-old was taking then-nine-week-old Thomas, now seven, for a walk in a sling when she noticed he wasn’t breathing. She was able to resuscitate­ Thomas using cardio­pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills she had learned just a week earlier.

Susie Campbell was able to revive her son Thomas Campbell, now 7, after he went into cardiac arrest. Picture: Danny Aarons
Susie Campbell was able to revive her son Thomas Campbell, now 7, after he went into cardiac arrest. Picture: Danny Aarons

Her first-aid training kicked in again just six months later when she heard her neighbour screaming frantically for help.

“I ran across and my neighbour’s son was turning blue, he had a lollipop stuck in his throat,” Mrs Campbell said.

“I knew I had to get it out because if it went down his throat any more he wouldn’t have been able to breathe.

“I flipped him upside down and all of a sudden it just shot out of his mouth.”

Mrs Campbell said knowing first aid was essential and every parent should make it their responsibility to learn.

“It gave me the confidence to deal with it then and there,” she said. “Without it, it may have been too late.”

Ms McCullagh said at the very minimum people learn CPR, which keeps oxygenated blood pumping through the body — ensuring it reaches the brain and vital organs.

If administered within the first minute after a person’s heart has stopped, their chance of surviving is 80 per cent. “People have to be ready to know what to do,” Ms McCullough said.

Knowing how to stop a critical bleed could also mean the difference between life and death, she said, adding that while first-aid won’t always result in the best outcome it can make a real difference.

“Once you have the knowledge it stays with you for life and gives you the confidence to react in the event of an accident,” she said.

Book in for a first aid or CPR training course with Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL, Northern Beaches, Sydney.

First Aid and CPR Certificate Northern Beaches Sydney

July 9th, 2019

Northern Beaches First Aid and CPR Training is provided by Simple Instruction at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney. We provide accredited certificates via online email within 2/3 business days and training is conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

Simple Instruction offers Provide First Aid HLTAID003 (Formerly Senior First Aid), Provide CPR HLTAID001 and Provide an Emergency First Aid response in an Education and Care setting HLTAID004 for both public courses at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney, NSW and private courses at your workplace or business.

What sets our First Aid or CPR courses a part from St John’s or Red Cross? Simple Instruction has local Northern Beaches trainers and knows what is required to deliver a fun, easy, interactive and educational training experience. Simple Instruction’s courses are cheaper than our competitors, we have free online training and we have free parking available at the Dee Why RSL, Sydney, NSW.

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

Learn First Aid or CPR and save a life!

January 5th, 2016

In the Manly, Warringah and Pittwater regions of our beautiful Northern Beaches of Sydney, we are blessed with fantastic water areas and beaches. It is important for everyone from Palm Beach to French’s Forest to Manly to become trained in First Aid and to potentially keep a loved one safe. Make the most of your holidays and get trained in our January 2016 courses that are available at the DY RSL in Dee Why. Make a payment with Simple Instruction to confirm your booking.

A FIRST aid course could save a life according to Red Cross and that life could be a young child.

Children and young adults are particularly at risk toddlers under four account for one in 10 drowning fatalities and young people from 15 to 24 account for 15%, knowing the basics of first aid can save lives according to Red Cross.

Ensure children are supervised when they go into the water even if they are strong swimmers, do not enter the water if someone appears to be drowning unless you are specifically trained, follow the basic life support procedure and do not endanger yourself, always call ‘000’ at the first opportunity to make sure help arrives as soon as possible.

A single day of training could potentially save the life of a friend or family member this summer and Red Cross offers a wide range of training courses in every state and territory. First aid trainer Anthony Cameron believes at least one person in every household should know first aid.

“First aid training is something you should do for the people you love.”

“Having the skills and confidence to react and respond correctly in an emergency can minimise the impact of an injury, assist with recovery and even save a life, it means you can relax a little more this summer.”

The funds generated from first aid training support the everyday work of Red Cross such as providing breakfast for school children who might otherwise go to school hungry, a daily phone call to check on the welfare of an elderly person living alone or clean water for families from remote villages in Myanmar and Timor-Leste.

To reserve a place at the next Red Cross first aid course in your area or to purchase a Red Cross first aid kit online go to redcross.org.au/firstaid or call 1300 367 428.

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