Archive for the ‘Defib’ category

Cheaper than St John’s, online course work, free manual, free CPR mask, free CPR chart

July 16th, 2018

Simple Instruction is based in Sydney’s Northern region (North Shore and Northern Beaches) but is willing to travel all over Sydney to complete nationally accredited training courses. We provide public training courses at The Dee Why RSL and are more than happy to come to your workplace, home, child care facility etc.

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 is a comprehensive course that will give you the knowledge, skills and confidence to help an ill or injured person until emergency help arrives. You will learn the DRSABCD action plan as well as Provide Cardiopulmonary resuscitation HLTAID001 (Including defibrillation), asthma, anaphylaxis and the management of various injuries and illnesses. Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 is required by ACECQA for anyone working with children including those completing their certificate 3 at TAFE in child services.

The First Aid training course has essential free online pre-work to be completed before you attend the course. Payment is easy and cheap. All course bookings receive a free manual, free CPR face shield, free CPR chart and a Dee Why RSL pen.

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 and are Nationally recognised and accredited.

First Aid Course – Northern Beaches. Do you know what to do?

July 15th, 2018

First Aid and CPR training on the Northern Beaches has never been so Simple! Do you know what to do in an emergency? Can you help a loved one? Do you know how to do CPR or use a defibrillator?

Book now with Simple Instruction for the HLTAID001 Provide CPR. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid or HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting. We conduct all public courses at the Dee Why RSL and will also do private courses throughout Sydney. All Accredited training courses are nationally recognised and conducted under the auspices of Allens Training RTO 90909.

People are dying of cardiac arrest because the majority of the public have no idea how to use a defibrillator, St John Ambulance has said.

Most people in the UK do not have the knowledge to respond if someone’s heart stops beating, a survey by the charity found.

Nearly two-thirds admitted they would not know what to do if faced with a cardiac arrest and seven out of 10 people said they would not feel confident using a defibrillator, according to the YouGov poll.

Defibrillator
Defibrillators are increasingly common in public places CREDIT: TELEGRAPH
The first aid charity warned that lives were being put at risk as it launched its campaign to educate the public how to deal with a cardiac arrest.

More than half of people do not know where their nearest life-saving equipment is and 62 per cent wrongly believe a defibrillator would cause harm to a patient, the survey also found.

But up to seven out of 10 people who suffer a cardiac arrest could survive if they are treated with a defibrillator within the first five minutes, St John Ambulance said.

None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life
James Radford, director of St John Ambulance
The charity urged people to find their closest defibrillator, be ready to spot the signs of cardiac arrest, know how to perform CPR and remember that early defibrillation gives the best chance of survival – grouped under the acronym C.A.R.E.

James Radford, director of St John Ambulance, said its research showed Britain has “a long way to go” in educating the public.

He said: “None of us want to find ourselves in a situation where we couldn’t save a loved one’s life, any more than we’d want them to stand by helpless if we suffered a cardiac arrest.

“That’s why we are urging everybody to learn the four simple steps of C.A.R.E today; so that if the worst happens tomorrow, we can all act quickly and confidently, especially when every second counts.”

Defibrillators are increasingly available in busy public spaces.

Earlier this year a study in Sweden found defibrillator-carrying drones could dramatically boost survival after a trial showed they could reach patients four times faster than an ambulance.

Northern Beaches Defibrillator Access

July 6th, 2017

Northern Beaches defibrillator roll out – well done Duncan Kerr! With this great initiative we need to make sure the Northern Beaches community is trained in CPR and defibrillator use. Please book into a HLTAID001 Provide CPR training course at the Dee Why RSL

Original Article – http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/public-access-defibrillators-to-be-installed-in-hightraffic-areas-on-the-northern-beaches/news-story/d6a0fdc81ee672a5f7e55349dbba2c84

Public access defibrillators to be installed in high-traffic areas on the northern beaches
Robbie Patterson, Manly Daily
July 5, 2017 12:00am

PUBLICLY accessible defibrillators would be rolled out across high-priority areas of the northern beaches as part of a campaign to improve survival chances of heart attack victims.

Frenchs Forest resident Duncan Kerr, a paramedic of 10 years, has urged Northern Beaches Council to explore the possibility of putting 24-hour public-access defibrillators in high-traffic areas.

He highlighted areas such as The Corso at Manly, Warringah Mall and high-use sporting fields as key spots.

Mr Kerr said defibrillators were often hard to access as they are usually locked away inside sport clubs.

A public access defibrillator could be installed in Manly Corso. Picture: David Swift.
“These are public-access defibrillators, which means anyone can use, ” he said.

The former Warringah councillor and member of the Cardiac Arrest Survival Foundation, pointed to the peninsula’s only device of that calibre, which has been installed at Cromer Park.

“It is a big deal, especially at night or if you are just out walking the dog and no one else is around and something happens,” he said.

“They are always accessible and always monitored, which means when you pull the defibrillator out a triple-0 call is made.”

At last week’s Northern Beaches Council meeting, infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor agreed to look into the proposal.

Northern Beaches Council infrastructure general manager Ben Taylor. Picture: Troy Snook.
“If you save one life, it is well and truly worth supporting such a proposal,” he said. “My recommendation would be that council support sporting clubs in terms of the rollout of portable defibrillators but also look at high-priority sites across the local government area (for the public-access models).”

He said the council would “see if external funding from the Office of Sport and Recreation was available”, but would also look at the council’s budget.

Mr Kerr, who plans to run for the Northern Beaches Council, said he would be pushing this as a major policy issue ahead of the September 9 election.

First aid and CPR learnt at school saves Lives.

November 1st, 2015

Chloe Booker
Published: October 11, 2015 – 7:25PM

An eight-year-old Altona North boy is being praised after using first aid training learnt at school to save a four-year-old boy from drowning.

Judd Greenham was playing in a Port Douglas resort pool while on a family holiday when he saw Matthew Sagar slip on a step, hit his head and fall unconscious to the bottom of the pool.

Although there were five adults watching over the shallow pool about noon on September 30, it happened so quickly that Judd was the only person to see the incident.

“The little boy slipped over on a step and hit his head and then I scooped him up,” Judd said. “His eyes were rolling back.”

St John Ambulance had visited Judd’s grade 2 class at Sacred Heart Primary School in Newport as part of its first aid in schools program in May.

Judd said his pool safety training kicked in and he began to practice what he’d been taught.

“I pulled his head up from the water,” he said. “I [put] my hand under his nose to see if he was breathing and he wasn’t breathing.”

Judd then called his mother, Natasha, who phoned an ambulance as Matthew’s father jumped in the pool.

Paramedics arrived and Matthew slowly regained consciousness as Judd stood over him repeating questions he learnt at school, such as “how many fingers am I holding up”?

The first aid program’s manager, Martin Wells, said the training had given Judd the confidence to act quickly to save Matthew’s life.

“He was five seconds away from being dead,” he said.

“It’s another testament to the proof that first aid training saves lives and you’re never too young or too old to learn what to do when in an emergency.”

Mr Wells said once water entered a child’s lungs, there was a 90 per cent chance of death at the poolside.

If paramedics were able to revive the child, there was still only a 2 per cent survival rate in hospital.

“We’re talking about a couple of seconds between life and death,” he said.

Mr Wells said it showed how important it was for all members of the public to learn first aid.

Matthew’s father, Peter Sagar, said the Strathmore family was “very fortunate” no water had entered the boy’s lungs.

“Judd was great,” he said. “He was onto him so quickly it didn’t given him a chance for anything to happen.”

Ms Greenham said she was “completely overwhelmed” and planned to take her son to SeaWorld to swim with dolphins as a reward.

Judd remained humble about his actions but said he was “very proud” of his efforts and wanted to learn more first aid.

“I kept giving him cuddles [afterwards] because I was scared of anything happening to him, so I was happy.”

This story was found at: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/five-seconds-from-death-boy-8-saves-child-using-first-aid-learnt-at-school-20151011-gk6d2q.html

Book an online CPR or First Aid course at the Dee Why RSL and get yourself trained for Summer. Simple Instruction is a Northern Beaches First Aid provider that gives back to the local community and schools. In 2015, Narrabeen Sports High School Students will all receive a CPR certificate as part of the PDHPE program.

HLTAID004 Northern Beaches

June 29th, 2015

(HLTAID004) What skills and knowledge will I get from this course?

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role.

There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks at least once in line with state/territory regulations, first aid codes of practice, ARC guidelines and workplace procedures:

  • located and interpreted workplace policies and procedures
  • conducted a hazard assessment and identified strategies to minimise risk
  • demonstrated safe manual handling techniques
  • assessed airway, breathing and responsiveness of casualty

Performed at least two minutes of uninterrupted CPR on an infant, a child and an adult resuscitation manikin placed on the floor, demonstrating the following techniques on each:

  • checking for response and normal breathing
  • recognising abnormal breathing
  • opening and clearing the airway
  • using correct hand location, compression depth rate in line with the ARC recommended ratio of compressions and ventilations
  • acting in the event of regurgitation or vomiting
  • following single rescuer procedure, including the demonstration of a rotation of operators with minimal interruptions to compressions
  • followed prompts of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)

Conducted a verbal secondary survey

Applied first aid procedures for the following:

  • allergic reactions
  • anaphylaxis
  • asthma
  • basic wound care
  • severe bleeding
  • burns
  • cardiac arrest
  • choking and airway obstruction
  • convulsions, including febrile convulsions
  • envenomation (using pressure immobilisation)
  • epilepsy and seizures
  • fractures, sprains and strains (using arm slings, roller bandages or other appropriate immobilisation techniques)
  • head injuries
  • poisoning
  • respiratory distress
  • shock

Followed workplace procedures for reporting details of the incident, including:

  • providing an accurate verbal report of the incident
  • completing an incident, injury, trauma and illness record
  • responded to at least three simulated first aid scenarios contextualised to the candidate’s workplace/community setting, and involving infants and children of varying ages.

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

  • state/territory regulations, first aid codes of practice and workplace procedures including:
  • ARC Guidelines for provision of CPR and first aid to infants, children and adults
  • guidelines from Australian national peak clinical bodies
  • safe work practices to minimise risks and potential hazards
  • first aid requirements for services under the Education and Care Services National Law

Infection control principles and procedures

Requirements for currency of skill and knowledge

Legal, workplace and community considerations, including:

  • need for stress-management techniques and available support following an emergency situation, including the psychological impact on children
  • duty of care requirements
  • respectful behaviour towards a casualty
  • own skills and limitations
  • consent, including situations in which parental/caregiver consent is required
  • privacy and confidentiality requirements
  • importance of debriefing

Considerations when providing first aid including:

  • airway obstruction due to body position
  • appropriate duration and cessation of CPR
  • appropriate use of an AED, including placement of pads for adults and children aged older than 8 years
  • specific considerations when using an AED on children aged between 1 and 8 years, including identification of AED with paediatric capability, paediatric voltage and use of paediatric pads
  • chain of survival
  • standard precautions and infection control

Principles and procedures for application of first aid in the following scenarios:

  • abdominal injuries
  • allergic reactions, including severe reactions
  • anaphylaxis
  • bleeding control
  • burns
  • cardiac conditions
  • choking and airway obstruction
  • cold and crush injuries
  • diabetes
  • dislocations
  • drowning
  • envenomation
  • environmental impact (including hypothermia, hyperthermia, dehydration and heat stroke)
  • epilepsy
  • eye and ear injuries
  • fractures
  • head, neck and spinal injuries
  • minor skin injuries
  • needle stick injuries
  • poisoning and toxic substances
  • respiratory distress, including asthma and other respiratory conditions
  • seizures
  • shock
  • soft tissue injuries
  • unconsciousness, abnormal breathing or not breathing

Basic anatomy and physiology relating to:

  • absence of normal breathing
  • anatomy of the external chest
  • specific anatomy of infant respiratory systems, including trachea, and implications for provision of CPR
  • basic anatomical differences between adults and children, and the implications for provision of first aid
  • normal clinical values for children
  • physiology relating to response/consciousness
  • symptoms and triggers of anaphylaxis
  • symptoms and triggers of asthma
  • upper airway anatomy and effect of positional change.

First Aid and CPR Saves Lives

November 17th, 2011

Bystanders often feel helpless when they see somebody collapse or get injured, but knowing just a little about the basics could transform the chances of survival, writes Lissa Christopher

The young marathon runner was still lying face down and showed no signs of life when Penelope Little arrived.

“As soon as I rolled him over it was very obvious … he wasn’t breathing and … I could tell pretty quickly he needed CPR [cardio pulmonary resuscitation],” the NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said. There were lots of people around but no one had tried to turn him over, let alone start CPR. They’d called for help and left it at that.

“At a bare minimum they should have rolled him onto his side, into the recovery position,” she says. “You should never leave someone lying face down. But this man required CPR and the fact that nobody gave it to him – it was alarming. It was like, ‘come on, people!’ This man is obviously unwell.”

It’s common for bystanders to do nothing when someone has collapsed and wait for “someone in a uniform” to turn up. Studies from the US have shown that the primary reason bystanders don’t attempt CPR is fear of not doing it correctly but, as Harvard Medical School states in its public health guides, “Poor CPR is better than no CPR” (see box).

”People don’t realise that the role of a bystander is actually very important,” Little says. “Particularly in case of CPR. It needs to be done very soon after the person has gone into cardiac arrest. It you have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, your chance of survival is about 3 per cent and the only way you are going to survive is if somebody quickly recognises that you are in cardiac arrest, quickly does CPR and quickly calls an ambulance.”

Presuming CPR requires an expert is probably the most serious first-aid misconception, but as NSW Ambulance and St John Ambulance will attest, there are plenty of others.

Take fainting, for example. It’s common for well-meaning people to try to get someone who has fainted to sit up. In fact, they should be left lying down.

St John Ambulance deals with a lot of fainting during the Royal Easter Show, Little says, particularly among elderly visitors. It happens everywhere from the showbag pavilion to the scones ”and it’s amazing how many times you get there and someone is trying to prop this woman up on a chair when all she wants to do is faint and lie back on the ground”.

“I often say to people, if a person wants to faint, let them do it. In essence, it’s the body trying to fix itself, usually because there’s a problem with their blood pressure.”

Other scenarios where paramedics and St John Ambulance volunteers commonly encounter misapprehensions include bleeding noses, burns, poisoning, penetrating injuries, choking, diabetic coma and seizures.

People often don’t realise that diabetics can lapse into a coma due to high blood sugar as well as low blood sugar, Caroline Woods, an intensive care paramedic with the Ambulance Service of NSW, says. Feeding sugar to someone who is having a high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) attack is only going to make things worse.

“We often find someone lying on the floor with all these lollies hanging out of their mouth,” she says. “Someone has tried their best to help but they’ve got it wrong.”

Little recalls attending to a seven-year-old girl having a seizure and her father had his hand in her mouth, holding onto her tongue in the mistaken belief he was stopping her from swallowing it. “I said to him, ‘take your hand out of her mouth and let her have her seizure’,” she says.

“Never try to hold down someone who is having a seizure,” Woods says. Clear them a space and put something soft under their head if possible. Don’t put anything in their mouth.

It’s not actually possible for someone to swallow their own tongue. People often bite their tongue during a seizure, but they’re highly unlikely to bite through it so don’t panic, she says.

Despite the poor odds, the marathon runner Little found lying face down did survive. Little got to him quite quickly and performed CPR for several minutes, another St John person arrived in minutes with a defibrillator and an ambulance arrived shortly after that. “He was 29 and he made a full recovery,” Little says. “He was a very lucky guy.”

“In my job, you often wish that a bystander had been more helpful. We are so lucky with NSW Ambulance that when you dial 000 they will give you advice over the phone but often people are hysterical or they don’t listen to that advice or they hang up.

“So many times I have thought, ‘please, God, I hope somebody is already doing CPR … because we are not going to be able to save this person unless somebody has started’.”

St John Ambulance runs regular first-aid courses and recommends a CPR refresher every 12 months.

Your closest Apply First Aid and Perform CPR course on The Northern Beaches is at The Brookvale Hotel. Come along and get trained by Simple Instruction and enjoy a fun day out.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/first-aid-and-the-myths-that-cost-lives-20110831-1jlty.html#ixzz1dvo8I1D2

First Aid in the Fitness Industry

August 24th, 2011

Gyms under spotlight after man’s death

Updated August 18, 2011 12:56:00

 Video: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-17/melbourne-gym-death-findings-released/2844062
Coroner calls for first aid training in gyms (7pm TV News VIC)
The coroner has recommended mandatory first-aid training for gym staff.

A Victorian coroner is calling for greater regulation of the
fitness industry after the death of a 29-year-old man at a Melbourne gym.

David Thomas went without CPR immediately after suffering a heart attack in
2007 because there was only one worker on duty and her first-aid training was
out of date.

The coroner found his death was not preventable, but on Wednesday recommended
the State Government introduce regulations for mandatory first-aid training for
gym staff.

Mr Thomas’s sister Jenny Cursio says her family has been fighting for four
years to improve industry regulations.

“We never wanted it to become anything more than a vehicle where we could
make a change,” she said.

The Thomas family’s lawyer, John Cain, says the Government must act
swiftly.

“The clear message from the coroner is that the industry regulation that has
existed to date has failed, it’s inadequate,” he said.

“What the coroner is saying is the Government needs to step in, fill that
void, and introduce some regulations.”

The gym’s owner, Fitness First, supports the move.

Topics: accidents—other, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, courts-and-trials, law-crime-and-justice, melbourne-3000, vic

First posted August 17, 2011 19:33:23

 

Comments (14)

Comments for this story are closed, but you can
still have your say.


  • ABC (Moderator):

    17 Aug 2011 8:29:45pm

    Do you think gyms need tougher regulations?

    Alert moderator


    • hairy nosed wombat:

      17 Aug 2011 9:02:49pm

      All gyms and public swimming pools should have Automated External
      Defibrillators (AEDs). There is very good evidence for this – they would save a
      few lives a year across Australia, and are only a couple of thousand
      dollars.

      Alert moderator


    • TigerLee:

      17 Aug 2011 11:54:59pm

      I’m a regular weight trainer and frequent the gym and believe that everyone
      does need to be sensible and be responsible for themselves. If you know yourself
      and your body well enough and you are honest with yourself then you should know
      your limits, etc. Having said that, there needs to be more guidance in the gym
      and DEFINITELY people with First Aid training on the gym floor – not just one
      person. Not sure that this environment should be too heavily regulated – don’t
      we have enough of that but something needs to happen. Gyms need to be more
      responsible and sensible when it comes to its patrons and their health &
      safety.

      Alert moderator


  • Lindsay Cooper:

    17 Aug 2011 8:39:48pm

    No! We have more than enough regulations now and many of them don’t work
    as intended. Regulations concerning drugs just keep the price up.

    Alert moderator


  • peter of mitcham:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:25pm

    Yes I do! Personally I wouldn’t go anywhere near them but my wife attended
    one of those “women only” gyms. How does that work? Isn’t it against the law to
    discriminate against someone in providing a service on the basis of their
    gender? Anyway this mob was downright dangerous in the pressure they put on
    people. Them and their stupid little school games trying to shame people into
    exercising harder. I think they should be tightly regulated. Take down the “No
    Pain No Gain” signs and put up one that says “A Fitter Person Is Not Necessarily
    A Better Person”

    Alert moderator


  • Founder:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:52pm

    Most of the time I go to the Gym there is no one on duty.
    Will they ban
    the 24 hour gyms?

    People do need to take some responsibility for their
    own lives.

    Alert moderator


    • Michael:

      17 Aug 2011 11:01:16pm

      I completely agree. Let people be responsible for their own decisions. I know
      that I want to be.

      Alert moderator


    • Foundette:

      17 Aug 2011 11:47:19pm

      “People do need to take some responsibility for their own lives.”

      How
      would they do that? By administering first aid to themselves after they’ve
      collapsed?

      Alert moderator


  • Lawrie:

    17 Aug 2011 9:09:56pm

    No! While I don’t use a gym, I run and work out with weights in my own home.
    What ever happened to personal responsibility? Take control of your life. If you
    slip over in a supermarket, you should have taken more care, instead of
    expecting to sue the supermarket for ‘their negligence’. If you have a fatal
    heart attack walking up steps, sad, but that is life.

    Alert moderator


  • Jeppa:

    17 Aug 2011 9:17:12pm

    Gyms do need to take occupational health and safety more seriously than they
    do. They are high risk areas, but there seldom seems to be anyone qualified to
    deal with injuries or illnesses available. At any other high risk workplace, not
    having a staff member with a current first aid certificate would be completely
    unacceptable.

    Whether the government is able to – or even should – change
    the way gym managers choose to run their facilities is another question. A
    better approach would be for consumers to ask serious questions about safety and
    the qualifications of *all* staff before signing up. There are plenty of gyms
    out there to choose from.

    Alert moderator


  • CVL:

    17 Aug 2011 9:28:34pm

    Absolutely – I’ve seen some appalling behaviour from on-duty gym
    “instructors”, from running away to laughing when people have seriously injured
    themselves on the equipment. And then there are those 2-3 hour windows that
    every gym I’ve been a member of has where there are no staff on
    duty.

    Clearly the only way forward is through the threat of government
    sanctions on an organisation and/or an individual.

    Alert moderator


  • rod:

    17 Aug 2011 9:29:30pm

    No

    I suppose first aid training is desirable for anyone, but there is
    no extra risk in a Gym over anything else you do.

    I just think we need
    less rules and more common sense.

    Alert moderator


  • FitnessEmployee:

    17 Aug 2011 9:52:19pm

    In SA, it is an industry standard that gym instructors, personal trainers and
    fitness instructors have up to date CPR and First Aid along with relevant
    qualifications. It is also common sense as fitness facilities have a duty of
    care over all people in their centre, so why wouldn’t a facility ensure staff
    know what they’re doing? Good centres hound their employees when certificates
    fall out of date; even better ones provide training regularly to ensure no one
    has an excuse. I have never worked in a centre that will employ someone without
    first aid and CPR training (and I’ve worked in LOTS of SA fitness facilities).

    I have worked at a centre where a client has died from a heart attack
    and staff were quick to respond and keep the client alive until paremedics
    arrived. Often, despite all the best cues and care and precautions from fitness
    centre staff, people just have heart attacks or other health issues. In the case
    I was exposed to, it was caused by something unpreventable, whether the client
    was at the gym, at home, or at a hospital.

    People do need to accept
    personal responsibility and recognise their boundaries when exercising AND staff
    have a responsibility to provide safe and effective information regarding a
    person’s exercise regieme and known health issues. This is why many choose to
    exercise under supervision of fitness facilities rather than on their
    own.

    If you feel you are not getting this from your fitness centre, ask
    them why, as its a legal requirement (and common sense). It might also be time
    to shop around for another gym!

    Regarding “shaming” participants into
    exercise: every instructor is different, same as doctors, nurses, physios,
    lawyers, etc. and if you don’t like their personality, try another instructor.
    Some do use pushier techniques (like what you imagine or see on TV), but more
    use motivational psychology and encouragement as these are proven to get better
    long-term results which ultimately serves the industry better and provides job
    security!

    Alert moderator


  • Teubes:

    17 Aug 2011 10:31:21pm

    The gym supports it ? if I owned the gym I would of already trained all staff
    in 1st aid and installed AEDs. A big gym like fitness first should already have
    this in place. You would think, wouldn’t you ?

    Alert moderator

Training for an Anapen?? First Aid and CPR courses available.

May 9th, 2011

How do I use the Anapen®?

There are 4 main steps.

REMOVE Anapen and DO NOT touch needle. Massage injection site for 10 seconds.

The needle does not retract completely and may cause a needle stick injury. The used Anapen may be placed in a suitable plastic container.

What should I do after giving the Anapen®?

You should always call an ambulance even if the Anapen® relieves symptoms. Your action plan for anaphylaxis provides the phone number. When an Anapen® has been used the patient should remain under medical observation for at least 4-6 hours after the symptoms have resolved.

This is great information for the use of Anapen’s. Simple Instruction has been conducting Apply First Aid (Senior First Aid) courses showing how the use an Anapen if anaphylaxis occurs. If you would like to come to one of Simple Instruction’s courses on the Northern Beaches or would like to book a Private course, we would love to hear from you. I hope you have enjoyed this information from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead and if you would like any more great information see their website @ www.wch.edu.au .

Northern Beaches, Sydney, one day First Aid course. DRSABCD – CPR guidelines have changed.

March 21st, 2011

Any attempt at CPR is better than none at all !

'If people are unwilling or unable to do ventilations, they should at least do chest compressions.'

‘If people are unwilling or unable to do ventilations, they should at least do chest compressions.’

17/03/2011- Revised national resuscitation guidelines highlight the need to get help as soon as possible, perform compressions before ventilations and give quality cardio-pulmonary resuscitation.

Issued by the Australian Resuscitation Council, the revised guidelines reflect recent scientific evidence that has been evaluated and published by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation.

Council chairman, UWA Winthrop Professor Ian Jacobs said getting help immediately was important because it was very difficult for someone to perform consistent, uninterrupted, quality CPR on their own.  And despite studies suggesting that providing ventilations during CPR had no added benefit in terms of survival over providing chest compressions only, Professor Jacobs said ventilation was still extremely important.

“Ventilation remains an important part of the resuscitation process and if people are trained and competent in resuscitation they should do conventional CPR, which involves both ventilation and compression,” he said.  “If people are unwilling or unable to do ventilations, they should at least do chest compressions.  The bottom line is that any CPR is better than no CPR at all.

“We recommend that you check for responsiveness, open the airway and if the person’s not breathing normally, give chest compressions and then start ventilations.  Compressions should be delivered at a rate of at least 100 compressions per minute (about two compressions per second) followed by two ventilations.”

Professor Jacobs said the Australian Resuscitation Council would hold its 8th International Spark of Life Conference in Perth from April 7 to 9.

“The conference will provide a great opportunity for those at all levels involved in resuscitation to hear leading international and Australian speakers discuss resuscitation guidelines and the evidence behind them,” he said.

A registered nurse who became a paramedic before moving into academia, Professor Jacobs’ research is in emergency medicine, resuscitation and pre-hospital care.

Browse the MedicalSearch directory: Accident & Emergency Care

Source: The University of Western Australia

If you would like to get trained in CPR or First Aid come to one of Simple Instruction’s training courses which are being held most weekends on the beautiful Northern Beaches at The Brookvale Hotel / Pub. The Apply (Senior) First Aid course is conducted from 10am to 4pm and The Perform CPR refresher course is being conducted on the same day from 1pm to 3pm. Remember any attempt is better than not attempt at all. Get trained today by giving Ian a call on – 0411 557 405 or email [email protected] .

Huge surf causes spinal injuries – Manly Daily

January 18th, 2011

17 Jan 11 @ 04:24pm – Manly Daily – http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/huge-surf-causes-spinal-injuries/

(not actual picture from the article – great use of the spinal board though)

TREACHEROUS surf conditions across the NSW coast resulted in the biggest number of spinal injuries in one weekend that the northern beaches has seen in over a decade.

Waves up to three metres high with wave periods of 14 to 16 seconds, as a result of tropical cyclone Vania, indicated a powerful swell that forced lifesavers to close some of the area’s beaches.

“In the last 10 to 15 years we haven’t had that number of spinal injuries in one weekend,” assistant director of rescue services Richard Andjelkovic said.

“It was an unusually high number and – from a branch perspective – it was a very busy weekend.”

On Sunday afternoon alone there were two spinal injuries at both Bilgola and Narrabeen and one at Queenscliff, duty officer Doug Lucas said.

The most serious was a 38-year-old man who had to be airlifted and transported to Royal North Shore Hospital after he went over the top of a wave while body-boarding and crashed into a sand bank, hitting his neck.

“He couldn’t feel anything from the waist down and was in a huge amount of pain,” Mr Lucas said.

“The conditions were unfriendly in the afternoon – the tide was fairly low and the waves were breaking right on the bank.”

The extent of the man’s injuries are yet to be confirmed.

The youngest victim, a 14-year-old male, was also rushed to hospital after diving headfirst into a sandbank at Long Reef Beach.

“People need to take it day by day and listen to what the lifeguards recommend, otherwise you wait for injuries to happen,” Mr Lucas said.

Yesterday, lifeguards were forced to temporarily shut all Pittwater, Manly and Warringah beaches except for Freshwater and Collaroy.

Would you know what to do in an emergency situation?

Simple Instruction conducts Apply First Aid (formerly Senior First Aid) and Perform CPR courses every fortnight at the Brookvale Hotel on the Northern Beaches Sydney.

Come along and get trained, as you never know when you will be in the situation to use your training and emergency care skills.

Course dates for 2011 are available by looking on the contact us / book a course part of the website.

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