Archive for the ‘DRSABCD’ category

Certificate III in Childcare – HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting

October 23rd, 2018

Providing First Aid and CPR certificates for the childcare industry on the Northern Beaches is our pleasure. The HLTAID004 Provide an Emergency First Aid Response in an Education and Care Setting is for Certificate III students to complete their Childcare course. Book in online today to secure your spot in a first aid or CPR course at the Dee Why RSL on the Northern Beaches.

Food allergy occurs in around 1 in 20 children and in about 2 in 100 adults. The most common triggers are egg, cow’s milk, peanut, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy, fish and wheat. The majority of food allergies in children are not severe, and may be ‘outgrown’ with time. However, peanut, tree nut, seed and seafood allergies are less likely to be outgrown and tend to be lifelong allergies. Some food allergies can be severe, causing life-threatening reactions known as anaphylaxis.

What is allergy?
An allergy is when the immune system reacts to a substance (allergen) in the environment which is usually harmless (e.g. food, pollen, animal dander and dust mite) or bites, stings and medications. This results in the production of allergy antibodies which are proteins in the immune system which identify and react with foreign substances.

An allergic reaction is when someone develops symptoms following exposure to an allergen, such as hives, swelling of the lips, eyes or face, vomiting or wheeze. It is important to note that only some people with allergy antibodies will develop symptoms following exposure to the allergen, hence confirmation of allergy by a clinical immunology/allergy specialist is required.

Allergic reactions range from mild to severe. Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction.

Symptoms of food allergy
Mild to moderate symptoms of food allergy include:

Swelling of face, lips and/or eyes
Hives or welts on the skin
Abdominal pain, vomiting
Signs of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to foods include:

Difficult/noisy breathing
Swelling of tongue
Swelling/tightness in throat
Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice
Wheeze or persistent cough
Persistent dizziness and/or collapse
Pale and floppy (in young children)
Food allergy can sometimes be dangerous
Although Mild, moderate and even severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to foods are common in Australia and New Zealand. However, deaths from anaphylaxis due to food allergy are rare in Australia and New Zealand. Most deaths can be prevented by careful allergen avoidance measures and immediate administration of an adrenaline autoinjector.

The most common foods causing life-threatening anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, milk and egg. Symptoms of anaphylaxis affect our breathing and/or our heart.

Sometimes food allergy may be less obvious
Less common symptoms of food allergy include infantile colic, reflux of stomach contents, eczema, chronic diarrhoea and failure to thrive in infants.

Not all adverse reactions to foods are due to allergy
The term allergy is often misused to describe any adverse reaction to foods which results in annoying (but ultimately harmless) symptoms such as headaches after overindulging in chocolate or red wine, or bloating after drinking a milkshake or eating too much pasta. While these reactions are not allergic, the result is a widespread impression that all adverse reactions to foods are trivial.

Adverse reactions to foods that are not allergy include food intolerances, toxic reactions, food poisoning, enzyme deficiencies, food aversion or irritation from skin contact with certain foods. These adverse reactions are often mistaken for food allergy.

How common is food allergy and is it increasing?
Studies have shown that food allergy affects 10% of children up to 1 year of age; between 4-8% of children aged up to 5 years of age and approximately 2% of adults.

Hospital admissions for severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have doubled over the last decade in Australia, USA and UK. In Australia, admissions for anaphylaxis due to food allergy in children aged 0 to 4 years are even higher, having increased five-fold over the same period.

Why the rise in food allergy?
We currently do not have clear information as to why food allergy seems to have increased so rapidly in recent years, particularly in young children. This area requires additional research studies, several of which are already underway.

Proposed explanations (which have not yet been proven in studies) include:

Hygiene hypothesis, which proposes that less exposure to infections in early childhood, is associated with an increased risk of allergy. A more recent version of the hygiene hypothesis proposes that the make-up and type of the micro-organisms to which the mother, baby and infant is exposed and colonised with may alter allergic risk.
Delayed introduction of allergenic foods such as egg, peanut or tree nuts.
Methods of food processing, such as roasted versus boiled peanuts.
Development of allergy to food by skin exposure such as the use of unrefined nut oil based moisturisers.
These areas require additional research studies, several of which are underway.

Allergies to cow’s milk, eggs and peanuts are the most common in children
Nine foods cause 90% of food allergic reactions, including cow’s milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, sesame, soy, fish, shellfish and wheat. Peanut, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, sesame and egg are the most common food allergens in older children and adults. Other triggers such as herbal medicines, fruits and vegetables have been described and almost any food can cause an allergic reaction.

When does food allergy develop?
Food allergy can develop at any age, but is most common in young children aged less than 5 years. Even young babies can develop symptoms of food allergy.

Reliable diagnosis of food allergy is important
Your doctor will normally ask a series of questions that may help to narrow down the list of likely causes such as foods or medicines consumed that day, or exposure to stinging insects. This approach will also help to exclude conditions that can sometimes be confused with food allergy and anaphylaxis.
Skin prick allergy tests or allergy blood tests help to confirm or exclude potential triggers. Sometimes a temporary elimination diet under close medical and dietetic supervision will be needed, followed by food challenges to identify the cause. Long term unsupervised restricted diets should not be undertaken, as this can lead to malnutrition and other complications such as food aversion.

While the results of allergy testing are a useful guide in determining whether the person is allergic, they do not provide a reliable guide to whether the reaction will be mild or severe. Information on allergy tests is available on the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/allergy-testing

Food allergy does not run in the family
Most of the time, children with food allergy do not have parents with food allergy. However, if a family has one child with food allergy, their brothers and sisters are at a slightly higher risk of having food allergy themselves, although that risk is still relatively low.

Some parents want to have their other children screened for food allergy. If the test is negative, that may be reassuring, but does not mean that the other child will never develop an allergy in the future. If their screening test is positive, it is not always clear whether it definitely represents allergy. In this situation, a food challenge (under medical supervision) may be required to confirm the allergy.

A positive allergy test is not the same as being food allergic
It is important to know that a positive skin prick allergy test or allergy blood test means that the body’s immune system has produced a response to a food, but sometimes these are false positives. In other words, the test may be positive yet the person can actually eat the food without any symptoms. For this reason, it is important to confirm the significance of a positive allergy test (in some circumstances) with a supervised food challenge. In a child with a positive test of uncertain meaning, this is often done around school entry age under medical supervision. Interpretation of test results (and whether challenge should be undertaken) should be discussed with your doctor.

Unorthodox so called allergy tests are unproven
There are several methods of unorthodox so called tests for food allergy. Examples include cytotoxic food testing, Vega testing, kinesiology, allergy elimination techniques, iridology, pulse testing, Alcat testing, Rinkel’s intradermal skin testing, reflexology, hair analysis and IgG food antibody testing. These have no scientific basis, are unreliable and have no useful role in the assessment of allergy. These techniques have not been shown to be reliable or reproducible when subjected to formal study. ASCIA advises against the use of these tests for diagnosis or to guide medical treatment. No Medicare rebate is available in Australia for these tests, and their use is also not supported in New Zealand.

Adverse consequences may also arise from unorthodox testing and treatments. Treatment based on inaccurate, false positive or clinically irrelevant results is not only misleading, but can lead to ineffective and at times expensive treatments, and delay more effective therapy. Sometimes harmful therapy may result, such as unnecessary dietary avoidance and risk of malnutrition, particularly in children. Information on these methods is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-testing/unorthodox-testing-and-treatment

Most children grow out of their food allergy
Most children allergic to cow’s milk, soy, wheat or egg will ‘outgrow’ their food allergy. By contrast, allergic reactions to peanut, tree nuts, sesame and seafood persist in the majority (~ 75%) of children affected. When food allergy develops for the first time in adults, it usually persists.

Allergic reactions may be mild, moderate or severe, and can be influenced by a number of factors
These factors include:

the severity of the allergy
the amount eaten
the form of the food (liquid may sometimes be absorbed faster)
whether it is eaten on its own or mixed in with other foods
exercise around the same time as the meal, as this may worsen severity
whether the food is cooked, as cooked food is sometimes better tolerated
the presence or absence of asthma
menstrual cycle in females
intake of alcohol
Can food allergies be prevented?
Information about allergy prevention is available on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention

Research into food allergy is ongoing
The increased frequency of food allergy is driving research into areas such as prevention, treatment and why it has become more common. Current areas of research include allergen immunotherapy (also referred to as desensitisation) to switch off the allergy once it has developed. Initial results are encouraging but it is not yet ready for routine clinical use. Research continues to explore new ways of more effectively treating this condition.

ASCIA Action Plans are essential
Many people with food allergies will have an accidental exposure every few years, even when they are very careful to avoid the foods they are allergic to. The difficulties of avoiding some foods completely make it essential to have an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis if an adrenaline autoinjector has been prescribed.

For those who are not thought to be at high risk of anaphylaxis and therefore have not been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector, an ASCIA Action Plan for Allergic Reactions should be completed and provided by your medical doctor. ASCIA Action Plans must be completed by a doctor and are available from the ASCIA website: www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources/ascia-action-plan-for-anaphylaxis

Living with your food allergy
As there is currently no cure for food allergy, strict avoidance is essential in the management of food allergy. It is important for individuals with food allergy to:

Carry their adrenaline (epinephrine) autoinjector (if prescribed) and ASCIA Action Plan with them at all times;
Know the signs and symptoms of mild to moderate and severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) and what to do when a reaction occurs;
Read and understand food labels for food allergy;
Tell wait staff that they have a food allergy when eating out;
Be aware of cross contamination of food allergens when preparing food.
Food allergy can be effectively managed
The good news is that people with food allergy can learn to live with their condition with the guidance of their clinical immunology/allergy specialist and a network of supportive contacts. Having an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis and adrenaline autoinjector offers reassurance, but this is not a substitute for strategies to minimise the risk of exposure.

Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (www.allergyfacts.org.au/) and Allergy New Zealand (www.allergy.org.nz) are community support organisations that offer valuable updates and tips for living with food allergies.

Further information on food allergy and anaphylaxis is provided on the ASCIA website:
www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy
www.allergy.org.au/hp/anaphylaxis-resources

First Aid Techniques – HLTAID003 Provide First Aid

August 26th, 2018

Learning basic first aid techniques can help you cope with an emergency. You may be able to keep a person breathing, reduce their pain or minimise the consequences of injury or sudden illness until an ambulance arrives. This could mean the difference between life and death for them.

It is a good idea to take a first aid course so that you can recognise an emergency and give basic first aid until professional help arrives.
Learn the first aid method of DRSABCD
First aid is as easy as ABC – airway, breathing and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In any situation, apply the DRSABCD Action Plan.

DRSABCD stands for:
Danger – always check the danger to you, any bystanders and then the injured or ill person. Make sure you do not put yourself in danger when going to the assistance of another person.
Response – is the person conscious? Do they respond when you talk to them, touch their hands or squeeze their shoulder?
Send for help – call triple zero (000). Don’t forget to answer the questions asked by the operator.
Airway – Is the person’s airway clear? Is the person breathing?
If the person is responding, they are conscious and their airway is clear, assess how you can help them with any injury.
If the person is not responding and they are unconscious, you need to check their airway by opening their mouth and having a look inside. If their mouth is clear, tilt their head gently back (by lifting their chin) and check for breathing. If the mouth is not clear, place the person on their side, open their mouth and clear the contents, then tilt the head back and check for breathing.
Breathing – check for breathing by looking for chest movements (up and down). Listen by putting your ear near to their mouth and nose. Feel for breathing by putting your hand on the lower part of their chest. If the person is unconscious but breathing, turn them onto their side, carefully ensuring that you keep their head, neck and spine in alignment. Monitor their breathing until you hand over to the ambulance officers.
CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) – if an adult is unconscious and not breathing, make sure they are flat on their back and then place the heel of one hand in the centre of their chest and your other hand on top. Press down firmly and smoothly (compressing to one third of their chest depth) 30 times. Give two breaths. To get the breath in, tilt their head back gently by lifting their chin. Pinch their nostrils closed, place your open mouth firmly over their open mouth and blow firmly into their mouth. Keep going with the 30 compressions and two breaths at the speed of approximately five repeats in two minutes until you hand over to the ambulance officers or another trained person, or until the person you are resuscitating responds. The method for CPR for children under eight and babies is very similar and you can learn these skills in a CPR course.
Defibrillator – for unconscious adults who are not breathing, apply an automated external defibrillator (AED) if one is available. They are available in many public places, clubs and organisations. An AED is a machine that delivers an electrical shock to cancel any irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), in an effort get the normal heart beating to re-establish itself. The devices are very simple to operate. Just follow the instructions and pictures on the machine, and on the package of the pads, as well as the voice prompts. If the person responds to defibrillation, turn them onto their side and tilt their head to maintain their airway. Some AEDs may not be suitable for children.

Book a first aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on the Northern Beaches with courses conducted at the Dee Why RSL. HLTAID003 Provide first aid is our most popular first aid course and the HLTAID004 Child Care first aid course for anyone in the child care industry under ACECQA. The HLTAID001 Provide CPR is a great refresher training course for those looking top update their skills.All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909 and the accredited and preferred supplier on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. All training course participants will receive a free manual, free chart and free CPR face shield.

Cheaper than St John’s, online course work, free manual, free CPR mask, free CPR chart

July 16th, 2018

Simple Instruction is based in Sydney’s Northern region (North Shore and Northern Beaches) but is willing to travel all over Sydney to complete nationally accredited training courses. We provide public training courses at The Dee Why RSL and are more than happy to come to your workplace, home, child care facility etc.

Provide First Aid HLTAID003 is a comprehensive course that will give you the knowledge, skills and confidence to help an ill or injured person until emergency help arrives. You will learn the DRSABCD action plan as well as Provide Cardiopulmonary resuscitation HLTAID001 (Including defibrillation), asthma, anaphylaxis and the management of various injuries and illnesses. Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 is required by ACECQA for anyone working with children including those completing their certificate 3 at TAFE in child services.

The First Aid training course has essential free online pre-work to be completed before you attend the course. Payment is easy and cheap. All course bookings receive a free manual, free CPR face shield, free CPR chart and a Dee Why RSL pen.

All courses are conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training Pty Ltd RTO 90909 and are Nationally recognised and accredited.

CPR Performed on Collaroy Beach, Northern Beaches, Sydney.

March 14th, 2018

A sad incident on the Northern Beaches where members of the public have performed CPR on a man who unfortunately has passed away. CPR is crucial life skill to learn and a massive congratulations should go to the people who got involved to help this man. Please remember that doing something is better than nothing when faced with a first aid situation. Follow the DRSABCD guidelines and you might be able to help a family member, friend or another member of the public.

Please get trained in CPR and first aid to help keep the Northern Beaches a safe place – it is a life saving skill that you may need one day.

Manly Daily, Manly Daily
February 20, 2018 6:07pm

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/manly-daily/man-dies-on-sydneys-northern-beaches/news-story/8d92e3880ab6e6b1d41b5dd61192b13e

A man has died at Collaroy Beach, on Sydney’s northern beaches, this afternoon.

Police said emergency services were called to Collaroy, just before 4.30pm, after a man was found unconscious in the water.

Members of the public commenced CPR on the man, aged in his 70s, before surf lifesavers arrived.

NSW Ambulance Paramedics and police attended, but he died at the scene.

Officers from Northern Beaches Police Area Command have commenced investigations into the incident.

Initial inquires suggest there are no suspicious circumstances.

All accredted training courses are held at the Dee Why RSL conducted under the auspices of Allen’s Training RTO 90909.

HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

December 30th, 2014

If you are completing the TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care then this is the ideal course for you. This is conducted locally on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, however, we do come to your Child Care Centre for private courses.

The HLTAID004  unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to provide a first aid response to infants, children and adults.

The HLTAID004 unit applies to educators and support staff working within an education and care setting who are required to respond to a first aid emergency, including asthmatic and anaphylactic emergencies. This unit of competency will contribute towards approved first aid, asthma and anaphylaxis training under the Education and Care Services National Law, and the Education and Care Services National Regulation (2011).

This HLTAID004 unit of competency has been approved by ACECQA and meets the requirements of “First Aid, Asthma & Anaphylaxis”.

http://www.acecqa.gov.au/

You will learn about:

  • Legal Issues and Infection control
  • DRSABCD action plan
  • The principles of first aid and its applications
  • Recognition and management of emergency situations
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Defibrillation
  • Treatment of shock, infection, fractures, bleeding and burns
  • Emergencies due to lack of oxygen, excess heat or cold
  • Recognition and management of medical conditions that may need emergency care, including heart attack, stroke, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy
  • Management of common medical emergencies
  • Treatment of poisoning including venomous bites and stings
  • Anaphylaxis and Asthma

Belrose, Narraweena, Frenchs Forest, Narrabeen, Manly, CBD, Brookvale, Cromer, Dee Why, Avalon, Pittwater, Mona Vale, Warringah, Curl Curl, Allambie, Balgowlah,  Long Reef, QueensCliff.

Complete your white card online TODAY – www.onlinewhitecardaustralia.com.au

Asthma Council Australia – Blue Butterfly Program

July 10th, 2012

At the National Asthma Council Australia, we know that if you are one of the 7 million Australians with allergy or the 2 million with asthma, you want to know how you could improve the health and wellbeing of you and your family. That’s why we developed the Sensitive Choice® program.

Our Sensitive Choice® blue butterfly symbol is a way of recognising products and services from companies that support asthma and allergy care. Products that carry the blue butterfly may be better choices for people with asthma and allergies.

The Sensitive Choice® program has over 200 products and services carrying the blue butterfly. Through a partnership between the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation of New Zealand and the National Asthma Council Australia, New Zealanders are also able to benefit from this program.

The program is a type of sponsorship program, although approved products and services must satisfy our independent Product Advisory Panel they do no harm and may offer relative benefits to people with asthma or allergies.

If you see the blue butterfly when shopping, stop for a moment and think about your family’s asthma and allergy care.

  • Do you know your triggers?
  • Are you taking steps to reduce your exposure to your triggers?
  • Have you had an asthma and allergy review with your doctor recently?
  • Do you follow your asthma or allergy action plan?

To learn more about the National Asthma Council Australia, please visit our website: www.nationalasthma.org.au

To learn more about the program and to discuss whether your product may be suitable, please contact:

Adam Trumble Email: [email protected]

Narrabeen Sports High School – Apply First Aid

March 15th, 2012

Apply First Aid Certification


On Friday March 2, 15 of our students and 14 students from Pittwater High School participated in a Apply First Aid Assessment day run by Mr Wood (PE). Prior to their practical and theoretical assessments on the day, all students hadto complete a rigorous online workbook detailing many of the issues that may be faced by a qualified first aider.
These 29 students undertook the certification to contribute towards the community service component of their Bronze Award. I would like to extend a huge thank you to Mr Wood for coordinating the day and enabling these students to achieve this three-year qualification.

 

CPR and First Aid in Schools

January 30th, 2012

Brittney Kleyn

THE shores of Summer Bay are never far from a little beachside drama – but when
it comes to water safety, the stars of Home and Away aren’t taking any chances.

The cast of the popular Australian show have thrown their support behind The
Daily Telegraph’s campaign to bring compulsory certified CPR training into high
schools.

Sign
our petition for certified CPR training in NSW
schools

When Axle Whitehead, who plays Liam Murphy on the show, found himself having
to rescue a tourist at Bondi
Beach
, he was thankful for the basic training he had received as a kid.

“I’ve witnessed it first hand and learning the old CPR, I think it’s
absolutely imperative for that one time when you need it,” he said.

Recommended Coverage

 

CERTIFIED CPR training could be provided to school
students for less than $40m a year – and lifesaving groups said there were
options to cut the cost.
THE face of road trauma prevention – now Associate
Professor Brian Owler backs The Daily Telegraph’s push for CPR in the national
school curriculum.
FOOTY players put their bodies on the line week in,
week out, but their injuries on the paddock can rarely be described as
life-threatening.
NO one knows how important CPR is more than doctors
– even the juniors, and a new batch of them are learning it this week at St
George Hospital.
LIFESAVING CPR must be taught in the nation’s
schools. Join our campaign backed by Royal Life Saving Australia and St John
Ambulance.
THE Parents and Citizens Association has supported
The Daily Telegraph’s popular campaign for certified CPR training for all
students.
NATIONAL curriculum writers will consider including
mandatory CPR lessons in all schools in the wake of a campaign by The Daily
Telegraph.

 

 

 

 

 

“It’s like learning how to draw or spell and as Australians we spend so much
time in the water. It is so important.”

His on-screen girlfriend Bianca Scott, played by Lisa Gormley, emphasised the
necessity of knowing the basics before heading out into the water.

“I just think it’s vital. It’s a good confidence thing for yourself as well –
knowing if something happens you have some knowledge of how to deal with it,”
she said.

Home and Away’s Samara Weaving said it was important for CPR training to
start young.

“Even if kids are just aware and learning the basics, things happen and they
need to know these vital skills.” she said.

With lifeguards always on the set, Weaving said it put the cast at ease
knowing someone experienced had their back.

“CPR skills aren’t too hard to teach. Not when you compare it to how useful
they are should that situation ever come up,” she said.

Now in its 24th season, the stars of the Channel 7 series said there was lots
of drama in store for the residents of Summer Bay.

“We’ve pulled the trigger. It’s a really exciting first half of the year for
all our characters. A lot of juicy stuff to come,” Whitehead said.

“Our characters are in a good place, for now that is. I guess it’s a case of
stayed tuned.”

Gormley said it was a privilege to be part of such a successful, long-running
program.

“It’s absolutely amazing. They are such a well-oiled machine and they’ve been
going so well for so long,” she said.

Simple Instruction is supporting this iniative to get CPR and First Aid into schools. Simple Instruction has been conducting courses for schools on the Northern Beaches and around Sydney for the past 2 years. Schools such as Narrabeen Sports High School, Barrenjoey High School, Ryde Secondary College, Hunters Hill High School, Balgowlah Boys High School and Mascot High School have taken this opportunity to increase the safety in the school with training to over 300 students and teachers in First Aid and CPR.

Simple instruction also has public Apply First Aid and Perform CPR courses most Saturdays at The Brookvale Hotel for anyone who would like to come along in 2012.

First Aid and CPR Saves Lives

November 17th, 2011

Bystanders often feel helpless when they see somebody collapse or get injured, but knowing just a little about the basics could transform the chances of survival, writes Lissa Christopher

The young marathon runner was still lying face down and showed no signs of life when Penelope Little arrived.

“As soon as I rolled him over it was very obvious … he wasn’t breathing and … I could tell pretty quickly he needed CPR [cardio pulmonary resuscitation],” the NSW Ambulance spokeswoman said. There were lots of people around but no one had tried to turn him over, let alone start CPR. They’d called for help and left it at that.

“At a bare minimum they should have rolled him onto his side, into the recovery position,” she says. “You should never leave someone lying face down. But this man required CPR and the fact that nobody gave it to him – it was alarming. It was like, ‘come on, people!’ This man is obviously unwell.”

It’s common for bystanders to do nothing when someone has collapsed and wait for “someone in a uniform” to turn up. Studies from the US have shown that the primary reason bystanders don’t attempt CPR is fear of not doing it correctly but, as Harvard Medical School states in its public health guides, “Poor CPR is better than no CPR” (see box).

”People don’t realise that the role of a bystander is actually very important,” Little says. “Particularly in case of CPR. It needs to be done very soon after the person has gone into cardiac arrest. It you have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, your chance of survival is about 3 per cent and the only way you are going to survive is if somebody quickly recognises that you are in cardiac arrest, quickly does CPR and quickly calls an ambulance.”

Presuming CPR requires an expert is probably the most serious first-aid misconception, but as NSW Ambulance and St John Ambulance will attest, there are plenty of others.

Take fainting, for example. It’s common for well-meaning people to try to get someone who has fainted to sit up. In fact, they should be left lying down.

St John Ambulance deals with a lot of fainting during the Royal Easter Show, Little says, particularly among elderly visitors. It happens everywhere from the showbag pavilion to the scones ”and it’s amazing how many times you get there and someone is trying to prop this woman up on a chair when all she wants to do is faint and lie back on the ground”.

“I often say to people, if a person wants to faint, let them do it. In essence, it’s the body trying to fix itself, usually because there’s a problem with their blood pressure.”

Other scenarios where paramedics and St John Ambulance volunteers commonly encounter misapprehensions include bleeding noses, burns, poisoning, penetrating injuries, choking, diabetic coma and seizures.

People often don’t realise that diabetics can lapse into a coma due to high blood sugar as well as low blood sugar, Caroline Woods, an intensive care paramedic with the Ambulance Service of NSW, says. Feeding sugar to someone who is having a high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) attack is only going to make things worse.

“We often find someone lying on the floor with all these lollies hanging out of their mouth,” she says. “Someone has tried their best to help but they’ve got it wrong.”

Little recalls attending to a seven-year-old girl having a seizure and her father had his hand in her mouth, holding onto her tongue in the mistaken belief he was stopping her from swallowing it. “I said to him, ‘take your hand out of her mouth and let her have her seizure’,” she says.

“Never try to hold down someone who is having a seizure,” Woods says. Clear them a space and put something soft under their head if possible. Don’t put anything in their mouth.

It’s not actually possible for someone to swallow their own tongue. People often bite their tongue during a seizure, but they’re highly unlikely to bite through it so don’t panic, she says.

Despite the poor odds, the marathon runner Little found lying face down did survive. Little got to him quite quickly and performed CPR for several minutes, another St John person arrived in minutes with a defibrillator and an ambulance arrived shortly after that. “He was 29 and he made a full recovery,” Little says. “He was a very lucky guy.”

“In my job, you often wish that a bystander had been more helpful. We are so lucky with NSW Ambulance that when you dial 000 they will give you advice over the phone but often people are hysterical or they don’t listen to that advice or they hang up.

“So many times I have thought, ‘please, God, I hope somebody is already doing CPR … because we are not going to be able to save this person unless somebody has started’.”

St John Ambulance runs regular first-aid courses and recommends a CPR refresher every 12 months.

Your closest Apply First Aid and Perform CPR course on The Northern Beaches is at The Brookvale Hotel. Come along and get trained by Simple Instruction and enjoy a fun day out.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/first-aid-and-the-myths-that-cost-lives-20110831-1jlty.html#ixzz1dvo8I1D2

First Aid in the Fitness Industry

August 24th, 2011

Gyms under spotlight after man’s death

Updated August 18, 2011 12:56:00

 Video: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-17/melbourne-gym-death-findings-released/2844062
Coroner calls for first aid training in gyms (7pm TV News VIC)
The coroner has recommended mandatory first-aid training for gym staff.

A Victorian coroner is calling for greater regulation of the
fitness industry after the death of a 29-year-old man at a Melbourne gym.

David Thomas went without CPR immediately after suffering a heart attack in
2007 because there was only one worker on duty and her first-aid training was
out of date.

The coroner found his death was not preventable, but on Wednesday recommended
the State Government introduce regulations for mandatory first-aid training for
gym staff.

Mr Thomas’s sister Jenny Cursio says her family has been fighting for four
years to improve industry regulations.

“We never wanted it to become anything more than a vehicle where we could
make a change,” she said.

The Thomas family’s lawyer, John Cain, says the Government must act
swiftly.

“The clear message from the coroner is that the industry regulation that has
existed to date has failed, it’s inadequate,” he said.

“What the coroner is saying is the Government needs to step in, fill that
void, and introduce some regulations.”

The gym’s owner, Fitness First, supports the move.

Topics: accidents—other, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, courts-and-trials, law-crime-and-justice, melbourne-3000, vic

First posted August 17, 2011 19:33:23

 

Comments (14)

Comments for this story are closed, but you can
still have your say.


  • ABC (Moderator):

    17 Aug 2011 8:29:45pm

    Do you think gyms need tougher regulations?

    Alert moderator


    • hairy nosed wombat:

      17 Aug 2011 9:02:49pm

      All gyms and public swimming pools should have Automated External
      Defibrillators (AEDs). There is very good evidence for this – they would save a
      few lives a year across Australia, and are only a couple of thousand
      dollars.

      Alert moderator


    • TigerLee:

      17 Aug 2011 11:54:59pm

      I’m a regular weight trainer and frequent the gym and believe that everyone
      does need to be sensible and be responsible for themselves. If you know yourself
      and your body well enough and you are honest with yourself then you should know
      your limits, etc. Having said that, there needs to be more guidance in the gym
      and DEFINITELY people with First Aid training on the gym floor – not just one
      person. Not sure that this environment should be too heavily regulated – don’t
      we have enough of that but something needs to happen. Gyms need to be more
      responsible and sensible when it comes to its patrons and their health &
      safety.

      Alert moderator


  • Lindsay Cooper:

    17 Aug 2011 8:39:48pm

    No! We have more than enough regulations now and many of them don’t work
    as intended. Regulations concerning drugs just keep the price up.

    Alert moderator


  • peter of mitcham:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:25pm

    Yes I do! Personally I wouldn’t go anywhere near them but my wife attended
    one of those “women only” gyms. How does that work? Isn’t it against the law to
    discriminate against someone in providing a service on the basis of their
    gender? Anyway this mob was downright dangerous in the pressure they put on
    people. Them and their stupid little school games trying to shame people into
    exercising harder. I think they should be tightly regulated. Take down the “No
    Pain No Gain” signs and put up one that says “A Fitter Person Is Not Necessarily
    A Better Person”

    Alert moderator


  • Founder:

    17 Aug 2011 8:59:52pm

    Most of the time I go to the Gym there is no one on duty.
    Will they ban
    the 24 hour gyms?

    People do need to take some responsibility for their
    own lives.

    Alert moderator


    • Michael:

      17 Aug 2011 11:01:16pm

      I completely agree. Let people be responsible for their own decisions. I know
      that I want to be.

      Alert moderator


    • Foundette:

      17 Aug 2011 11:47:19pm

      “People do need to take some responsibility for their own lives.”

      How
      would they do that? By administering first aid to themselves after they’ve
      collapsed?

      Alert moderator


  • Lawrie:

    17 Aug 2011 9:09:56pm

    No! While I don’t use a gym, I run and work out with weights in my own home.
    What ever happened to personal responsibility? Take control of your life. If you
    slip over in a supermarket, you should have taken more care, instead of
    expecting to sue the supermarket for ‘their negligence’. If you have a fatal
    heart attack walking up steps, sad, but that is life.

    Alert moderator


  • Jeppa:

    17 Aug 2011 9:17:12pm

    Gyms do need to take occupational health and safety more seriously than they
    do. They are high risk areas, but there seldom seems to be anyone qualified to
    deal with injuries or illnesses available. At any other high risk workplace, not
    having a staff member with a current first aid certificate would be completely
    unacceptable.

    Whether the government is able to – or even should – change
    the way gym managers choose to run their facilities is another question. A
    better approach would be for consumers to ask serious questions about safety and
    the qualifications of *all* staff before signing up. There are plenty of gyms
    out there to choose from.

    Alert moderator


  • CVL:

    17 Aug 2011 9:28:34pm

    Absolutely – I’ve seen some appalling behaviour from on-duty gym
    “instructors”, from running away to laughing when people have seriously injured
    themselves on the equipment. And then there are those 2-3 hour windows that
    every gym I’ve been a member of has where there are no staff on
    duty.

    Clearly the only way forward is through the threat of government
    sanctions on an organisation and/or an individual.

    Alert moderator


  • rod:

    17 Aug 2011 9:29:30pm

    No

    I suppose first aid training is desirable for anyone, but there is
    no extra risk in a Gym over anything else you do.

    I just think we need
    less rules and more common sense.

    Alert moderator


  • FitnessEmployee:

    17 Aug 2011 9:52:19pm

    In SA, it is an industry standard that gym instructors, personal trainers and
    fitness instructors have up to date CPR and First Aid along with relevant
    qualifications. It is also common sense as fitness facilities have a duty of
    care over all people in their centre, so why wouldn’t a facility ensure staff
    know what they’re doing? Good centres hound their employees when certificates
    fall out of date; even better ones provide training regularly to ensure no one
    has an excuse. I have never worked in a centre that will employ someone without
    first aid and CPR training (and I’ve worked in LOTS of SA fitness facilities).

    I have worked at a centre where a client has died from a heart attack
    and staff were quick to respond and keep the client alive until paremedics
    arrived. Often, despite all the best cues and care and precautions from fitness
    centre staff, people just have heart attacks or other health issues. In the case
    I was exposed to, it was caused by something unpreventable, whether the client
    was at the gym, at home, or at a hospital.

    People do need to accept
    personal responsibility and recognise their boundaries when exercising AND staff
    have a responsibility to provide safe and effective information regarding a
    person’s exercise regieme and known health issues. This is why many choose to
    exercise under supervision of fitness facilities rather than on their
    own.

    If you feel you are not getting this from your fitness centre, ask
    them why, as its a legal requirement (and common sense). It might also be time
    to shop around for another gym!

    Regarding “shaming” participants into
    exercise: every instructor is different, same as doctors, nurses, physios,
    lawyers, etc. and if you don’t like their personality, try another instructor.
    Some do use pushier techniques (like what you imagine or see on TV), but more
    use motivational psychology and encouragement as these are proven to get better
    long-term results which ultimately serves the industry better and provides job
    security!

    Alert moderator


  • Teubes:

    17 Aug 2011 10:31:21pm

    The gym supports it ? if I owned the gym I would of already trained all staff
    in 1st aid and installed AEDs. A big gym like fitness first should already have
    this in place. You would think, wouldn’t you ?

    Alert moderator

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