Archive for the ‘Choking’ category

First Aid and CPR Training available on the Northern Beaches

April 3rd, 2018

First aid: Australia has lowest rate of training, says Australian Red Cross
ABC Radio Sydney By Amanda Hoh
Posted 13 Sep 2017, 7:00am

Girls arms doing CPR on man lying on his back
PHOTO: Performing CPR involves repeating 30 chest compressions followed by two breaths. (ABC RN/Cathy Johnson)
RELATED STORY: Firefighters armed with new CPR skills to help save each other’s livesRELATED STORY: Snakes out in Sydney due to warm weather and urban sprawl
Do you know what to do if someone burns themselves with hot water at home?

What about if your child drinks something poisonous or stops breathing?

Australia has the lowest rates of first-aid training in the world, according to the Australian Red Cross, with less than 5 per cent of people trained in how to handle an emergency situation.

Almost 500,000 Australians are admitted to hospitals every year as a result of injury, with around 12,000 dying from their injuries, primarily from falls.

Most injuries occur in the home, followed by the workplace.

“Workplaces offering first aid is low,” Red Cross spokeswoman Amanda Lindsay said.

“They might encourage their staff to do first-aid training, but paying for first-aid training, only 50 per cent of Australian workplaces [do so].

“Giving someone the confidence to perform first-aid duties in the workplace is important.”

Know how to perform CPR
Learning how to tend to someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest is one of the key skills in an emergency situation.

More than 33,000 Australians suffer cardiac arrest each year, and only 5 to 7 per cent survive.

First aid sign
PHOTO: Keep a first-aid kit at home and in the your vehicle and replace expired items. (ABC News: Freya Michie)
The longer you delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the less chance of survival.

After 10 minutes, the survival rate drops substantially.

“Keeping the blood flow to the vital organs and the brain is so important,” Ms Lindsay said.

“You’re there as a first responder, you’re not a paramedic, you’re not a doctor, but you’re there to respond to the incident straight away to give them the best chance of survival.”

Not just about treating a person
For ABC Radio Sydney caller Stephen, knowing first aid was a big help when he witnessed a car accident in the 1970s and the skills have stuck with him since.

First-aid training was offered as part of his job.

“There was a pregnant lady sitting on the side of the road. I thought, ‘be calm, assure everyone’. I called the ambulance and got the medics. Calmness was one of the aspects [of first aid].”

For Phil, receiving infant first-aid training when he had his children was invaluable.

“Something that stuck with me was that you may not be able to resuscitate a child or an adult, but it’s about keeping it going until emergency services get there, because you can keep blood flowing to their brain by keeping the oxygen going. You might not see the results but there’s still something going on in there that is saving their life.”

Ms Lindsay encouraged all parents and carers to undertake a first-aid course.

The Red Cross also recommends keeping your first-aid training certificate up to date and to keep a well-stocked first-aid kit at home and in your vehicle and regularly replace expired items.

How do you treat:
Cardiac arrest
If possible use a defibrillator, which many workplaces make available. Otherwise start CPR, which involves 30 chest compressions followed by two rescue breaths. Repeat at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute.

Burns
The Red Cross recommends putting the burn area under cool running water for 20 minutes. If there is an open wound, apply a non-adhesive dressing; if it’s larger than the palm of the person’s hand, get them to hospital straight away.

Choking
The Heimlich manoeuvre which thrusts the person from around the abdomen is no longer recommended. Perform five back thrusts in between the shoulder blades. If the item hasn’t been dislodged, five chest thrusts. Encourage the person to cough if they can still breathe.

Poisons
Don’t encourage the person to vomit. Call the poison hotline straight away on 13 11 26. Each poison will have a standard way of proceeding.

Snake bites
Apply the pressure immobilisation technique by bandaging below the snake bite to the top of the snake bite as tight as you can. Keep the affected body part still.

Book a course on the Northern Beaches of Sydney. We can increase the rate of training and keep our Northern Beaches a safe place. Simple Instruction first aid and CPR training is offering Nationally Recognised Training at the Dee Why RSL 10 to 15 times per month at a time that suits you.

Book a First Aid or CPR course on the Northern Beaches to get the accredited training course that suits your needs. HLTAID003 Provide First Aid – for all industries, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR HLTAID001 in high risk industries and Provide an emergency response in an education and care setting HLTAID004 for Child care workers or those studying a Certificate 3 at TAFE.

www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Recognised by Allen’s Training PTY LTD RTO 90909

First Aid for Children HLTAID004

August 10th, 2017

Manly Daily First Aid Tips – Book a public or private first aid or CPR training course. For parents with young children or child care workers please read the below and have the training for the unexpected.

Simple Instruction offers First Aid and CPR training at the Dee Why RSL on a regular basis.

NORTHERN BEACHES

How to deal with common accidents

Tips for parents when littlies are in the wars

WITH discovery and exploration in babies and children come falls and bumps.

Here’s what to do if one of these common accidents happens to your child.

BURNS AND SCALDS

PUT the burnt area under running water from the cold tap as soon and leave it there for at least 20 minutes.

Never place anything else on the burn – ice, creams and butter do not help. Get medical help if the burn is bigger than a 20 cent piece, looks raw or blistered or is on the face, neck or genitalia.

CHOKING

CHECK first if your child can breathe, cough or cry and, if so, see if they can dislodge the item by coughing, clearing the mouth or lying them forward.

For small children, tip them upside down. If this does not work, call 000.

POISONING

SIGNS of poisoning can include stomach pains and vomiting, drowsiness, trouble breathing, change of skin colour, blurred vision or even collapse.

Don’t give your child anything to eat or try to make them vomit. Pick up the poisons container, if you have it, and call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 1126.

TOOTH KNOCKED OUT

IF A baby tooth gets knocked out, there’s little chance of saving it, but you should always go straight to the dentist regardless.

In most cases, baby teeth come out because they are loose. See your dentist to ensure there are no cracked pieces of tooth left that can potentially cause infection and damage to the tooth that will come through.

If an adult tooth is knocked out it may reattach to the bone, but this is less likely with very young children. However, still retrieve the fallen tooth and either put it in milk or get your child to hold it in their mouth inside their cheek until you get to the dentist.

NEAR DROWNING

IF YOUR child is unconscious, unresponsive and not breathing, start resuscitation if you know how.

Any first aid you know is better than nothing. Call 000 and the operators can give you advice on how to administer first aid while you wait for the paramedics to arrive.

OBJECTS IN EAR, NOSE

DON’T try to remove a small object stuck in your child’s ear or nose as you may make the situation worse.

Go straight to your doctor to have it removed safely.

POKE IN THE EYE

A FINGER, a fork or a tree branch can cause damage if poked into a child’s eye.

Keep the child calm and check if they can open their eye. If the eye is red, sore or irritated, go to a doctor.

BUMPS AND FALLS

APPLY ice or a cold pack immediately to any bruise, bump or swelling.

If your child is in extreme pain, can’t move a limb or is unable to put pressure on an area, they may have fractured a bone. See a doctor.

JAMMED FINGERS

IF THERE’S bleeding, apply pressure and if there’s bruising, apply ice. If they are in extreme pain and can’t move the joint, you will need to get medical help.

Dr Ken Peacock, head of general medicine, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

Every Parent should know CPR and First Aid

August 4th, 2017

A mother has revealed how the first aid classes she took helped to save her son’s life when he stopped breathing.
Rachel Taylor had just called an ambulance when 10-month-old Finnley turned blue after going into septic shock.

Fortunately the 30-year-old was able to keep a calm head and performed the life-saving procedure until paramedics arrived.
Her action saved her son’s life and Rachael and Tom Batham are now urging others to learn CPR in case they ever find themselves in a similar situation.
‘It was petrifying but I just took my mind back to that day we did first aid training and just focused on what I needed to do,’ said Rachael, who is from Heaton, Newcastle.
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR

‘I didn’t start crying because there was no time to do that.’
Finnley first fell ill a month ago with a cold, cough and temperature and doctors prescribed him antibiotics for a possible infection.

Helicopter police officer spied on people sunbathing naked and having sex
On Monday I switched on the baby monitor and left him sleeping. Half an hour later, I heard a small noise,
so went up.
‘Finn was sat but as I went over to pick him up, his face just changed, it kind of contorted. Then he keeled over and started convulsing.
‘He’d had a febrile convulsion when he was a few months old so although I was shaking with fear, I thought I knew what I was dealing with.’
Mother reveals why every parent should know CPR
Finnley will make a full recovery (Picture: NCJ Media)
Rachael called 999 and was told an ambulance was on its way to her home.
But just as she was about to hang up Finnley stopped fitting, stiffened, turned blue and stopped breathing.

‘Panther-like creature’ stalks group for more than a mile through woodland
Rachael added: ‘That’s when the panic started to set in. I told the operator he’d stopped breathing and asked if I should do CPR.’
An ambulance crew arrived minutes later after FInnley was taken to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary where he spent a week in intensive care.
Fortunately, he will make a full recovery but Rachael is now urging all parents to take paediatric first aid.
MORE: UK

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She said: ‘I don’t want to scare people but I want to raise awareness of how important it is. Without it, we could have lost him.
‘It was reading a story similar to ours on Facebook, that prompted me to book our course. I hope this might do the same for someone else.’

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2017/08/02/mother-reveals-why-every-parent-should-know-cpr-6823531/#ixzz4oklsMOjt

Fidget Spinner Accident – First Aid required

May 28th, 2017

First aid course on the Northern Beaches with Simple Instruction will teach you how to help when a child is choking. Our first aid course is the best present you can give for Christmas or even a birthday. Give the gift of saving a life with a first aid course voucher.

A 10-YEAR-OLD girl is lucky to be alive after a piece of her fidget spinner — the latest must-have toy for kids — got lodged in her throat.

Kelly Rose Joniec, from Texas, has described the terrifying moment her daughter Britton swallowed a piece of one of the wildly popular playthings and was rushed to hospital for surgery, reports The Sun.

She wrote on Facebook: “On the way home from a fun swim meet, I heard Britton make an odd retching noise in the back seat as I was driving.

“Looking back in the mirror, I saw her face turning red and drool pouring from her mouth.”

The mum pulled over and her daughter motioned to her throat. Britton had put part of the fidget spinner in her mouth to clean it and accidentally swallowed it.

The pair rushed to hospital, but doctors couldn’t tell whether the piece was in her airway or oesophagus so an ambulance rushed them to Texas Children’s Hospital near Houston.

An x-ray showed the piece of metal was in her oesophagus and it was removed through surgery.

Kelly Rose added: “Fortunately, we had a positive outcome, but it was pretty scary there for a while.”

Now she is warning other parents about the peril the toys can represent.

She said: “Not all spinners come with age-appropriate warnings. The bushings pop out easily, so …. keep in mind that these present a potential choking hazard.”

Fidget spinners were designed as stress-relieving tools to help kids deal with ADHD and anxiety.

The propeller-shaped gadgets, which come in a variety of colours, have ball bearings which allow them to spin.

You simply hold it in between your fingers, flick it and watch it spin. Some versions even light up, and they are completely silent.

Kids can compete against each other to come up with the best tricks, or to keep their gadget spinning the longest.

They are designed for those who “can’t quite keep still and need a fidget phenomenon to stop the strains and stresses whilst working”.

Promoted to beat boredom and increase concentration, some Amazon reviewers even claim the toys have helped them stop biting their nails.

But some parents claim they turn their kids into ‘morons’.

The gadgets are small enough to fit in a pocket.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission

Provide First Aid – Top Ten Tips

March 19th, 2017

First aid is the life saving, critical help given to an injured or a sick person before medical aid arrives. This timely assistance, comprising of simple medical techniques, is most critical to the victims and is, often, life saving. Any layperson can be trained to administer first aid, which can be carried out using minimal equipments.

Bleeding nose
A nosebleed occurs when blood vessels inside the nose break. Because they’re delicate, this can happen easily. When this happens, lean slightly forward and pinch your nose just below the bridge, where the cartilage and the bone come together. Maintain the pressure for 5 to 15 minutes. Pressing an ice pack against the bridge can also help. Do not tilt your head back if your nose bleeds as you may swallow blood which can potentially go in your lungs. If the bleeding doesn’t stop after 20 minutes or if it accompanies a headache, dizziness, ringing in the ears, or vision problems, please consult a health expert.

A Sprain
Sprains occur when the ligaments surrounding a joint are pulled beyond their normal range. Sprains are often accompanied by bruising and swelling. Alternately apply and remove ice every 20 minutes throughout the first day. Wrapping the joint with an elastic compression bandage and elevating the limb may also help. Stay off the injury for at least 24 hours. After that, apply heat to promote blood flow to the area. If the injury doesn’t improve in a few days, you may have a fracture or a muscle or ligament tear so call a doctor.

A Burn
If there’s a burn place it under cool (not cold) running water, submerge it in a bath and loosely bandage a first- or second-degree burn for protection. Do not put an ice pack on major burns. Ice can damage the skin and worsen the injury. Don’t pop blisters. Don’t apply an antibiotic or butter to burns as this can breed infection. First-degree burns produce redness while second-degree burns cause blisters and third-degree burns result in broken or blackened skin. Rush to doctor if the victim is
coughing, has watery eyes, or is having trouble breathing.

Choking
True choking is rare but when a person is really choking, he can’t cough strongly, speak, or breathe, and his face may turn red or blue. For a victim of age one or older have the person lean forward and, using the palm of your hand, strike his back between the shoulder blades five times. If that doesn’t work, stand behind the victim, place one fist above the belly button, cup the fist with your other hand, and push in and up toward the ribs five times. If you’re alone, press your abdomen against something firm or use your hands. Do not give water or anything else to someone who is coughing.

Poisoning
Potential household hazards include cleaning supplies, carbon monoxide and pesticides. Bites and stings can also be poisonous to some people. If a person is unconscious or having trouble breathing, call the doctor. Do not wait until symptoms appear to call for help. And don’t try to induce vomiting. The poison could cause additional damage when it comes back up. The victim shouldn’t eat or drink anything in case of suspected poisoning.

Animal Bites
In case of an animal bite, stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure until it stops. Gently clean with soap and warm water. Rinse for several minutes after cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream to reduce risk of infection, and cover with a sterile bandage. Get medical help if the animal bite is more than a superficial scratch or if the animal was a wild or stray one, regardless of the severity of the injury.

Bruises
Ice the area on and off for the first 24-48 hours. Apply ice for about 15 minutes at a time, and always put something like a towel or wash cloth between the ice and your skin. Take a painkiller if there is pain. Visit your doctor if the bruise is accompanied with extreme pain, swelling or redness; if the person is taking a blood-thinning medication or if he /she cannot move a joint or may have a broken bone.

Diarrhea
During diarrhea its essential to treat dehydration. Give an adult plenty of clear fluid, like fruit juices, soda, sports drinks and clear broth. Avoid milk or milk-based products and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3 to 5 days after you get better. Milk can make diarrhea worse. Give a child or infant frequent sips of a rehydration solution. Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school and give banana, rice, apple and toast. For an adult, add semisolid and low-fiber foods gradually as diarrhea stops. Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.

Eye Injury
If there is chemical exposure, don’t rub your eyes. Immediately wash out the eye with lots of water and get medical help while you are doing this. Do not bandage the eye. If there has been a blow to the eye apply a cold compress, but don’t put pressure on the eye. If there is any bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or if it hurts when the eye moves, see a doctor right away. For a foreign particle in the eye – don’t rub the eye, pull the upper lid down and blink repeatedly. If particle is still there, rinse with eyewash. If this too doesn’t help, see your doctor.

HLTAID004 – Childcare First Aid Course – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

October 25th, 2016

Do you think its time to complete the HLTAID004 Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting?

Learn all the important skills to save your child.

Topics include:

CPR
Asthma Awareness
Fracture management and skin injuries
Anaphylaxis
Control of external bleeding
Medical Conditions

A local mum has stressed the benefit of learning first aid after ‘one of the scariest moments of her life’ occurred when her little girl began choking. A child choking is among every parent’s greatest fears and one which was shockingly real for Martina Cullen, the Donegal mum behind this weekend’s Bump and Baby Expo in Letterkenny. The traumatic incident involving her first child, at the age of just 10 months, left Martina regretting that she’d never learned how to respond to such a life-threatening situation. When she set about organising a two-day baby show featuring the latest products, service and expert advice for parents, top of her list was the provision of expert advice on child choking and first aid.“There were so many things I hadn’t a clue about as a first time parent but in hindsight child first aid is vitally important. “To see your baby choking is a horrific experience. Our little girl was playing on a mat when all of a sudden she went quiet. My husband lifted her up and saw she was in distress – unable to breath, gasping to get air. “In that moment we both realised that we didn’t know what to do. We tried slapping her gently on the back but didn’t want to hurt her, we tried looking in her mouth but nothing was visible. We had no idea what she had swallowed. “She was turning blue. Within 30 seconds we were in the car and on the way to the hospital which was only a few minutes from the house. My husband kept tapping her on the back the whole way. It wasn’t until we were pulling into the hospital grounds that she finally vomited and started to breathe once again. Words can’t describe the relief as we pulled into A&E and she was smiling as though completely unaware of the danger. “We were lucky, sadly it can be a different story for other families. That’s why two of our key talks during the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny in the Radisson Blu Hotel on Saturday and Sunday will be delivered by First Aid Aware on ‘What to do when a child is choking’ and ‘Choking hazards and what to look out for’.” First Aid Aware Paediatric Instructor Niall Clancy said families should be aware of the dangers to infants and young children to be best placed to deal with situations. “Choking is one of the main causes of cardiac arrest in children so it’s very important for parents and anyone responsible for children to know how to react. We’re delighted to be taking part in the Bump and Baby Expo Letterkenny where we’ll be giving people a chance to learn about what to do when a child is choking and allowing them to practice the techniques on mannequins. We’ll also be advising people on what dangers to look out for and explaining that if an item can fit through the inside of a toilet toll then it may represent a choking hazard,” he said. In establishing Bump and Baby Expo, Martina aimed to give parents “information that really matters” all under one roof. The career mum – who co-founded human resources and employment law consultancy, HR Team while pregnant with her second child and following a successful career as operations manager for a multinational retailer – said the event will be highly informative in everything needed from pregnancy to pre-school. “I have two bouncing baby girls aged one and three and – as anyone with young children will tell you – it can be hard to keep up with the latest information on products, child safety and health matters for mums and babies. “The whole idea behind the Bump and Baby Expo is to provide expert advice, the best products and most beneficial services needed by families with babies and young children.

Read more at: http://www.derryjournal.com/news/mum-urges-awareness-of-choking-hazards-and-first-aid-1-7528612

Book in to a Provide first aid or Provide CPR course on the Northern Beaches by checking our website at www.simpleinstruction.com.au

Warning for parents: Do you know what to do if your child starts choking?

November 15th, 2015

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/warning-for-parents-do-you-know-what-to-do-if-your-child-starts-choking/story-fni0cx12-1227607619027
November 15, 2015 12:00am
Jane HansenThe Sunday Telegraph

Book a First Aid or CPR course with Simple Instruction on Sydney’s beautiful Northern Beaches. We have courses conducted at the DY RSL at Dee Why which is a central location for the Northern Beaches. Make a payment online today.

WATCHING a few first aid videos on YouTube was all that stood between Claudine Thomas and her daughter Luciana choking to death.
“Mums around me had been telling me to do a first aid course and I hadn’t got around to it but I had watched YouTube videos to get the basics,” Ms Thomas said.

“I put her over my knee, supported her head and hit her back three times and out came this 5cm piece of grout. I was shocked and I still called an ambulance.”

Choking killed three NSW children last year and, with the peak season for choking coming up, doctors are warning that parents must be prepared, not wait until they are in the middle of a life or death situation.

“It’s a frightening event and you can’t check the internet then on what to do, you need to know beforehand what to do,” Dr John Curotta, from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, said.

The approaching festive season is a peak time for choking incidents, he said.

“A few years ago we had 10 cases coming up to Christmas. There’s Christmas parties, party food like nuts and stuff left behind like Lego and kids will swallow anything because they like to test taste things and test things with their mouths,” Dr Curotta said.

In Luciana’s case, it was a piece of loose tile grout.

Luciana, 13 months, almost choked on a piece of tile grout but her mother Claudine saved her. Picture: Justin Lloyd
The pair had been in the bathroom of their Parramatta home, brushing their teeth. Ms Thomas was distracted for only a moment. The next thing she knew, her child was choking.

“I heard this choking sound and I grabbed her and she was red and blue,” Ms Thomas, 31, said.

Luciana is now fine but Dr Curotta said parents cannot be complacent.

Thanks to Hollywood, he said most people mistakenly think the Heimlich manoeuvre, where you squeeze a child from behind and push their stomachs, is the correct technique.

“Heimlich is in everyone’s mind but it’s not the technique recommended and there’s remarkably little evidence that it works,” he said.“If the child is coughing but still breathing, the best thing to do is quiet them down and call the ambulance with no sudden moves, you don’t want to dislodge the object to a more dangerous position.

“If the child is blue and not breathing, the best thing to do is put the child across you knee with their head down lower than their chest and deliver four sharp blows between the shoulder blades.

“You have gravity helping and the chest on your knees so you are getting good pressure to get air to blast things out.

“If that doesn’t work, put your fingers down the child’s throat and by then you or someone else should call Triple-0.”

Choking is mainly caused by the inhalation of food, followed by inhalation of other foreign bodies. Small airways can easily become blocked or compressed.

CHOKING: WHAT TO DO

■ If child is choking, check first if the child is still able to breathe, cough or cry. Child may be able to dislodge the foreign object by coughing

■ If the child IS breathing, do not try to dislodge the foreign object by hitting the child on the back because this may move the food into a more dangerous position and make the child stop breathing. Phone Triple-0 for an ambulance

■ If the child is NOT breathing try to dislodge the foreign object by placing the child face down over your lap so that their head is lower than their chest and give the child four sharp blows on the back just between the shoulder blades. This should provide enough force to dislodge the foreign object

■ Check again for breathing. If the child is still not breathing, urgently call Triple-0 and ask for an ambulance. The ambulance service will tell you what to do next

HLTAID004 Northern Beaches

June 29th, 2015

(HLTAID004) What skills and knowledge will I get from this course?

Performance Evidence

The candidate must show evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the job role.

There must be demonstrated evidence that the candidate has completed the following tasks at least once in line with state/territory regulations, first aid codes of practice, ARC guidelines and workplace procedures:

  • located and interpreted workplace policies and procedures
  • conducted a hazard assessment and identified strategies to minimise risk
  • demonstrated safe manual handling techniques
  • assessed airway, breathing and responsiveness of casualty

Performed at least two minutes of uninterrupted CPR on an infant, a child and an adult resuscitation manikin placed on the floor, demonstrating the following techniques on each:

  • checking for response and normal breathing
  • recognising abnormal breathing
  • opening and clearing the airway
  • using correct hand location, compression depth rate in line with the ARC recommended ratio of compressions and ventilations
  • acting in the event of regurgitation or vomiting
  • following single rescuer procedure, including the demonstration of a rotation of operators with minimal interruptions to compressions
  • followed prompts of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)

Conducted a verbal secondary survey

Applied first aid procedures for the following:

  • allergic reactions
  • anaphylaxis
  • asthma
  • basic wound care
  • severe bleeding
  • burns
  • cardiac arrest
  • choking and airway obstruction
  • convulsions, including febrile convulsions
  • envenomation (using pressure immobilisation)
  • epilepsy and seizures
  • fractures, sprains and strains (using arm slings, roller bandages or other appropriate immobilisation techniques)
  • head injuries
  • poisoning
  • respiratory distress
  • shock

Followed workplace procedures for reporting details of the incident, including:

  • providing an accurate verbal report of the incident
  • completing an incident, injury, trauma and illness record
  • responded to at least three simulated first aid scenarios contextualised to the candidate’s workplace/community setting, and involving infants and children of varying ages.

Knowledge Evidence

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

  • state/territory regulations, first aid codes of practice and workplace procedures including:
  • ARC Guidelines for provision of CPR and first aid to infants, children and adults
  • guidelines from Australian national peak clinical bodies
  • safe work practices to minimise risks and potential hazards
  • first aid requirements for services under the Education and Care Services National Law

Infection control principles and procedures

Requirements for currency of skill and knowledge

Legal, workplace and community considerations, including:

  • need for stress-management techniques and available support following an emergency situation, including the psychological impact on children
  • duty of care requirements
  • respectful behaviour towards a casualty
  • own skills and limitations
  • consent, including situations in which parental/caregiver consent is required
  • privacy and confidentiality requirements
  • importance of debriefing

Considerations when providing first aid including:

  • airway obstruction due to body position
  • appropriate duration and cessation of CPR
  • appropriate use of an AED, including placement of pads for adults and children aged older than 8 years
  • specific considerations when using an AED on children aged between 1 and 8 years, including identification of AED with paediatric capability, paediatric voltage and use of paediatric pads
  • chain of survival
  • standard precautions and infection control

Principles and procedures for application of first aid in the following scenarios:

  • abdominal injuries
  • allergic reactions, including severe reactions
  • anaphylaxis
  • bleeding control
  • burns
  • cardiac conditions
  • choking and airway obstruction
  • cold and crush injuries
  • diabetes
  • dislocations
  • drowning
  • envenomation
  • environmental impact (including hypothermia, hyperthermia, dehydration and heat stroke)
  • epilepsy
  • eye and ear injuries
  • fractures
  • head, neck and spinal injuries
  • minor skin injuries
  • needle stick injuries
  • poisoning and toxic substances
  • respiratory distress, including asthma and other respiratory conditions
  • seizures
  • shock
  • soft tissue injuries
  • unconsciousness, abnormal breathing or not breathing

Basic anatomy and physiology relating to:

  • absence of normal breathing
  • anatomy of the external chest
  • specific anatomy of infant respiratory systems, including trachea, and implications for provision of CPR
  • basic anatomical differences between adults and children, and the implications for provision of first aid
  • normal clinical values for children
  • physiology relating to response/consciousness
  • symptoms and triggers of anaphylaxis
  • symptoms and triggers of asthma
  • upper airway anatomy and effect of positional change.

HLTAID004 – Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

December 30th, 2014

If you are completing the TAFE Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care then this is the ideal course for you. This is conducted locally on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, however, we do come to your Child Care Centre for private courses.

The HLTAID004  unit of competency describes the skills and knowledge required to provide a first aid response to infants, children and adults.

The HLTAID004 unit applies to educators and support staff working within an education and care setting who are required to respond to a first aid emergency, including asthmatic and anaphylactic emergencies. This unit of competency will contribute towards approved first aid, asthma and anaphylaxis training under the Education and Care Services National Law, and the Education and Care Services National Regulation (2011).

This HLTAID004 unit of competency has been approved by ACECQA and meets the requirements of “First Aid, Asthma & Anaphylaxis”.

http://www.acecqa.gov.au/

You will learn about:

  • Legal Issues and Infection control
  • DRSABCD action plan
  • The principles of first aid and its applications
  • Recognition and management of emergency situations
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Defibrillation
  • Treatment of shock, infection, fractures, bleeding and burns
  • Emergencies due to lack of oxygen, excess heat or cold
  • Recognition and management of medical conditions that may need emergency care, including heart attack, stroke, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy
  • Management of common medical emergencies
  • Treatment of poisoning including venomous bites and stings
  • Anaphylaxis and Asthma

Belrose, Narraweena, Frenchs Forest, Narrabeen, Manly, CBD, Brookvale, Cromer, Dee Why, Avalon, Pittwater, Mona Vale, Warringah, Curl Curl, Allambie, Balgowlah,  Long Reef, QueensCliff.

Manly Daily – 09/08/11

August 10th, 2011

Why our children have ADHD, allergies and anxiety

8 Aug 11 @  06:00pm by Carleen Frost

PARENTS are being urged to get back to basics and lead a more “primitive” lifestyle to boost their child’s health and happiness.

Narrabeen Dr Robyn Cosford said returning to “real” food, avoiding artificial light and switching off wireless internet were the first steps she recommended to her patients, particularly those with behavioural problems.

Dr Cosford believes wireless internet and other household appliances could be changing the function of the brain.

“The first thing that we try to get our parents to do is getting their kids to eat all real foods – no more processed or packaged foods,” she said.

“We have this very strong tendency for the diet to be predominantly wheat and sugar-based, so it’s not uncommon that the children have an adverse reaction to those foods.

“A true food allergy is not that common. Food intolerance or food insensitivity is very common.”

Dr Cosford, the founder of the Northern Beaches Care Centre, will address the Mindd Foundation’s International Forum on Children in Randwick this weekend.

The forum will focus on the links between nutrition and lifestyle and conditions such as ADHD, allergies, anxiety and digestive problems.

She said her message would be about “restoring” lifestyles.

“The environment is increasingly toxic and more and more people are having a problem,” she said.

“We have to get back to going outside and connecting with the Earth and cutting out all this artificial light.

“If people could do these basics, straight away they will find a significant change in their child’s behaviours.”

DOCTOR’S TIPS FOR HEALTHY EATING
 Primitive: Eat “real’’ foods and avoid processed foods where possible.
 Preservatives: Always check the ingredients on the packet.
 Packaged: Even if it’s packaged, choose a healthy option.
 Pre-prepared: Always ask what’s in takeaway food.

Fresh is best for our kids

EATING fresh food and keeping active were among the main reasons Michael Harvey wanted to raise his daughter Chloe on the northern beaches.

The father-of-one said spending time outdoors, with plenty of exercise, was a way of life on the peninsula.

“We both lead pretty active lifestyles, her mum and myself,” he said.

“We try to eat reasonably well and play as much sport as we can.

“We have lived in a few places and we have relatives around Sydney and they talk about childhood obesity and we don’t really see that on the northern beaches because the lifestyle is so active.’’

Mr Harvey said he and his partner tried to avoid giving Chloe processed and prepackaged foods and encouraged her to play outside as often as possible.

The one-year-old has even been practising her surfing moves for when she’s old enough to paddle out.

“We don’t really give her too much of that sort of stuff,” he said of sugary, processed foods.

“If she has chocolate we notice the sugar rush pretty quickly. And she’s pretty active – we try to get her outside a couple of times a day because she sleeps better and she’s happier.”

To learn what to do if your child has an allergy come to Simple Instruction’s Apply First Aid or Perform CPR course on the 27th of August 2011 at the Brookvale Hotel.

Full article: http://manly-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/why-our-children-have-adhd-allergies-and-anxiety/

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